Debates of 18 Dec 2014

MR SPEAKER
PRAYERS 11:15 a.m.

VOTES AND PROCEEDINGS AND THE OFFICIAL REPORT 11:15 a.m.

Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Members , Correction of the Votes and Proceedings of Wednesday, 17th December, 2014.
rose
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
Mr KyeiMensahBonsu 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am sorry to take us back to page 7.
Yesterday, the Hon Irene Naa Torshie Addo (Mrs), came to the Chamber. She was a bit late in coming. She came to the Chamber.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well.
Page 15…27
rose
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Yes, Hon Member?
Mr O. B. Amoah 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, I am sorry, but I would have to take you back to page 8.
Indeed, yesterday, I was present in the House and I chaired the Subsidiary Legislation Committee till about 7. 00 p.m.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Hon Member, were you
Mr O. B. Amoah 11:15 a.m.
I was here before I went there.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well.
Mr O. B. Amoah 11:15 a.m.
Mr Speaker, it is on page 8, number 12. I was marked absent, but I was here.
Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
Very well.
Hon Members , the Votes and Proceedings of Wednesday, 17th December, 2014, as corrected, are hereby adopted as the true record of proceedings.
We have the Official Report of Wednesday, 10th December, 2014, for correction.
  • [No Correction was made to the Official Report of Wednesday, 10th December, 2014.]
  • Mr Alban S. K. Bagbin 11:15 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want first, to seek your leave for us to vary the order of Business, as set out in the Order Paper, so that we move to Public Business, as you just stated.
    Once your leave has been granted -
    Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
    Yes.
    Mr Bagbin 11:15 a.m.
    Then we can take item 4. Once again, with your kind permission and with the indulgence of my Hon Colleagues, the Deputy Minister for Finance is available to first withdraw the Instrument titled “Internal Revenue (Amendment) Regulations, 2014, which was laid, but not gazetted, according to
    the Constitutional provision.
    This is because the attention of the Attorney-General's Department was not drawn, that it was laid on that day. That is the information I got. So, it was not gazetted in accordance with the law. We are withdrawing that, so that you permit him to lay it today. The Attorney-General and Minister for Justice is available. There are other Instruments that would follow the same order when we get to that time, and the Minister would be doing that.
    So, that is the information I have, and I believe that is in accordance with article 11 (7) (b).
    Mr Speaker, with your permission, I beg to read 11:15 a.m.
    “Any Order, Rule or Regulation made by a person or authority under a power conferred by this Constitution or any other law shall -
    (b) be published in the Gazette
    on the day it is laid before Parliament;”
    Mr Speaker, as I stated earlier, the attention of the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice , who is to cause this to be done, was not drawn to the fact that we laid those Instruments. That is why they are being withdrawn to be re-laid, so that they can be gazetted today.
    Mr Speaker, I am done.
    Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
    Hon Minority Leader?
    The Hon Majority Leader is asking for the Hon Deputy Minister for Finance to withdraw the Instrument on behalf of the substantive Minister.
    Mr KyeiMensahBonsu 11:15 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I noticed that my Hon Colleague is up, so, if we can listen to him -
    Mr Speaker 11:15 a.m.
    Hon Member, I will listen to him, but now I am asking you that an application has been made by the Hon Majority Leader, and I want to get your response to that. I will call him later. I want your response, so that we can have this thing withdrawn and re-laid, and then I will hear what he wants to say.
    Mr KyeiMensahBonsu 11:15 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we had some discussions on this yesterday, so there should not be any resistance.
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Very well.
    Hon Deputy Minister for Finance, on behalf of the Finance Minister?

    Deputy Minister for Finance (Mr Cassiel Ato B. Forson) (on behalf of the
    Minister for Finance) 11:25 a.m.
    I rise to ask the leave of the House to accordingly withdraw the Internal Revenue (Amendment) Regulations, 2014 which was laid in this House on the 8th of December, 2014.
    Mr Speaker, this is due to a technical defect that has been detected by the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice.
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Hon Members, this is a very straightforward issue. It has been laid and not gazetted. There is a problem in terms of the Constitution. So, they want to withdraw it, so that they can lay it and gazette it today.
    Hon Member for Sekondi?
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:25 a.m.
    Mr Speaker,
    thank you very much.
    I agree with you that it is a straight- forward matter; it has not matured.

    But Mr Speaker, of course, from the way article 11(7) is framed, it is presumed that the laying takes place before the gazetting.
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Absolutely.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:25 a.m.
    But I am wondering, whose responsibility is it to ensure that it is gazetted? This is because immediately after the Instrument is laid, it is in the possession of Parliament. So, I would think that the Table Office ought to liaise with the Attorney-General. It could be that there are so many Instruments that have been laid and matured that may not have been gazetted on the day they were laid because we have no way of checking.
    This is the issue I would want to raise, that the Table Office also ought to ensure that the Attorney-General gazettes it.
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Hon Member for Sekondi
    - 11:25 a.m.

    Mr Bagbin 11:25 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, clearly, we have a way of checking. That is why we know that this has not been gazetted. The issue has to do with communication. Before it got to the notice of the Attorney- General's Department, the day was over - [Interruption]. Mr Speaker, as the Leader of Government Business -
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Hon Member for Sekondi, in your own submission, you made reference to the Table Office. Now, why are you pushing the burden on the Leader of Government Business? [Laughter.]
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:25 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, he is the Leader of Government Business and he sees to Government Business in this House. So, even if the Table Office does not liaise with the Attorney-General, by virtue of the nature of Government Business, it is his responsibility.
    He says he has a way of checking. Well, I would not debate that one.
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    No! You are absolutely right. There should be some effective co- ordination. Indeed, the Assembly Press was for matters of this nature. So, this is an area that we need to work on to make sure that there is effective co-ordination to make sure that the time a document is laid, the Assembly Press and the Attorney- General's Office -
    So, the Instrument is accordingly withdrawn, referral to the Subsidiary Legislation Committee also withdrawn.
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Now, will the Hon Deputy Minister lay it?
    rose
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Yes, Hon Member for Manhyia South, are you on a point of order?
    Dr Matthew Opoku Prempeh 11:25 a.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Against whom?
    Dr Prempeh 11:25 a.m.
    Not against you, Mr Speaker. It is against the process.
    The Hon Member for Sekondi just talked about other documents that have not been probably gazetted --
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Please, we are talking about a particular document.
    Dr Prempeh 11:25 a.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker. One is maturing on Monday, 22nd December, 2014 from the Electoral Commission and sufficient copies have not been given - by our Standing Orders.
    Mr Speaker, it is serious.
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Hon Member for Manhyia South, you are out of order.

    Hon Member, I learnt that they have not distributed enough copies. You are right. I have directed that enough copies be made available to Hon Members by the close of the day. My attention has not been drawn to this matter.

    Yes, Hon Minority Leader, and then Hon Member for Wenchi.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:25 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is good the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice is here. Whereas the Instrument has not matured, the Electoral Commission has already started implementing the contents of the Instrument. It is most irregular, and this kind of “patapaa” thing the EC is doing, it must be called to order.
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Hon Minority Leader, you raised that issue yesterday, and I told you that we had a way of dealing with the Electoral Commission. So, let us find a way of resolving this matter with the EC. But we are not on that Instrument.
    Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 11:25 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I can concede
    that we sometimes relax the rules. But the Instrument that we are talking about is not what we are considering now.
    Again, Mr Speaker, we have been told that they do not have copies of the Instrument, yet they are aware that the provisions are being implemented - [Interruption] - How did they know?
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Hon Members, please, let us make progress.
    Hon Minority Leader, you raised this matter yesterday -
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:25 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, with respect, this is a very serious matter. I am not too sure that the Hon Majority Leader is the only stranger in Jerusalem. The EC has caused announcements to be made, and they are implementing aspects of it-- The Electoral Areas have not been defined. It has asked potential aspirants to pick up forms.
    An Hon Member 11:25 a.m.
    They are submitting them tomorrow.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:25 a.m.
    He has asked them to submit them by the close of tomorrow.
    Mr Speaker 11:25 a.m.
    Hon Minority Leader?
    Hon Deputy Minister for Finance, have you laid the new Instrument? Please, lay it now.
    PAPERS 11:25 a.m.

    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Yes, the Hon Member for Wenchi?
    Prof. George Y. Gyan-Baffour 11:35 a.m.
    Mr
    Speaker, I do not know whether it was a ruling or maybe, what transpired here. Does it mean that the onus of getting it gazetted is now removed from the Executive to the Legislature? Is that what

    we are saying here?
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    No, Hon Member for
    Wenchi. It is an issue with - I will refer to Leadership, because now, the Assembly Press is no longer under our control as it used to be. So, we do not have that control over it now as it used to be in the First and Second Republics.
    So, if I sit here and I make a certain order, which cannot be implemented, the order would be an order in futility.
    That is why I will like Leadership to take up this matter and see how we can synchronise this issue.
    Hon Majority Leader, which item are we taking? Are we taking (a) (ii)?
    Mr Bagbin 11:35 a.m.
    Yes, that is so. We will take 4 (a) (ii).
    Dr Anthony A.Osei 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, given what has happened about the
    Electoral Commission's Legislative Instrument, may I know if sufficient copies are available, so that the proper distribution is made? Can we be assured?
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Very well.

    Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your kind permission, we can now take item number number 4 (b).
    The Attorney-General and Minister for Justice, for the same reason that I gave in respect of item 4 (a) (i), is withdrawing these Instruments that were laid. They were laid and the same information because they were done the same day and since the information did not get to them, all those Instruments were affected. That is why she is here to withdraw them and re-lay them.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Hon Attorney-General and Minister for Justice?
    Mrs Mariet ta Brew Appiah- Opong 11:35 a.m.
    Respectfully, Mr Speaker, I seek permission of the House to withdraw the
    -- 11:35 a.m.

    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Hon Members, this is consequential. The arguments are the same. So, the documents are accordingly
    withdrawn, for the same reasons articulated by the Majority Leader.
    The consequential referral to the Subsidiary Legislation Committee is also withdrawn.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Now, we will move on to have it laid properly and make sure that they are gazetted today, so that we do not come back for the same reason to have them withdrawn.
    PAPERS 11:35 a.m.

    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 11:35 a.m.
    Mr Speaker. with your kind permission, we would now take the items on the Addendum, so that the Deputy Minister could leave to do some urgent matters and return to the House.
    It is just laying of Papers. We would just continue with the laying of Papers, item number 1 (a) on the Addendum.
    Mr Speaker 11:35 a.m.
    Very well.
    By the Deputy Minister for Finance (Mr C. A. B. Forson) (on behalf of the Minister) --
    (a) (i) Request for waiver of taxes on the onshore component involving Value Added Tax (VAT) , National Health Insurance Levy (NHIL) and withholding taxes amounting to four million, nine hundred and one thousand, three hundred and eighty-six United States dollars and nine cents (US$4,901,386.09) on direct project expenditure in respect of the implementation of Ghana Dedicated Security Information System Project Phase II.
    (ii) Request for waiver of customs duty, Value Added Tax (VAT), ECOWAS Levy, EDAIF Levy, destination inspection fees, withholding taxes and other imports amounting to sixteen million, nine hundred and twelve thousand, six hundred and eighty-four United States dollars (US$16,912,684.00) on plants, materials and equipment to be procured in respect of the design, construction and equipping of the University Hospital in Legon and additional works on the Ho Regional and Hohoe District Hospitals.
    Referred to the Finance Committee
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Yes, Hon Member?
    Dr A. A. Osei 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, yesterday, we pointed out something to the Hon Deputy Minister, and I thought that it would be reflected.
    We get a request to waive taxes in dollar amounts. That is incorrect -- but it does not say that here. So, the Committee
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Hon Members, the Paper has been referred to the Finance Committee. So any issues, you can bring them to the floor.
    Mr Bagbin 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, we could now take Item number 1 (b) on the Addendum.
    By the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice -
    (b) High Court (Civil Procedure) (Amendment) Rules, 2014.
    Referred to the Subsidiary Legislation Committee
    Mr Bagbin 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your kind permission, we may take item number 2 on the Order Paper Addendum. It is at page 2 of the Addendum -- the Motion on the Fourteenth Report of the Appointments Committee on the President's nominee for the position of Minister for Power.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Chairman of the Committee, item number 2 on the Order Paper Addendum.
    MOTIONS 11:45 a.m.

    Chairman of the Appointments Committee (Mr Ebo Barton-Odro) 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwith- standing the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1), which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Fourteenth Report of the Appointments Committee on H.E. the President's nomination for ministerial appointment may be moved today.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I have always thought that this was not
    the correct procedure but maybe, because it has been moved by the Hon Deputy Speaker, grudgingly, I would second the Motion.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Have you seconded it?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, grudgingly.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    We move straight to item number 3 on the Order Paper Addendum.
    Chairman of the Committee?
    Fourteenth Report of the Appointments Committee
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Ebo Barton-Odro) 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Fourteenth Report of the Appointments Committee on H.E. the President's nomination for ministerial appointment.
    Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present your Committee's Report.
    Introduction
    His Excellency President John Dramani Mahama, in furtherance of article 78 of the 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana, on Friday, 21st November, 2014, communicated to Parliament for prior approval, the nomination of Hon. Kwabena Donkor (Dr) as Minister- designate for the Ministry of Power.
    In pursuance of Order 172 of the Standing Orders of the House, the nomination was subsequently referred by the Rt. Hon Speaker to the Appointments Committee for consideration and report.
    Reference documents
    The Committee referred to the following documents during its public hearing and subsequent deliberations:
    i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana
    ii. The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
    iii. The Curriculum Vitae of the nominee.
    Procedure for Committee's deliberations
    As part of its procedures and in line with the provisions of the Standing Orders of the House, the Committee caused to be published the name of the nominee in the national dailies for three consecutive times to request memoranda from the general public. The publication also carried the programme of the public hearing for the attention of the general public.
    Additionally, the Committee obtained confidential reports with respect to the nominee from relevant State institutions to ascertain the background of the nominee and his tax compliance status to guide its deliberations. The Committee requested for and received communica-tion from the Bureau of National Investigations (BNI), the Ghana Police Service and the Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA).
    The public hearing
    In fulfilment of Order 172 (3) of the Standing Orders of the House, the Committee held a public hearing on Monday, 15th December, 2014 to consider the qualification, eligibility and capability of the nominee for the position to which he has been nominated.
    At the commencement of proceedings,
    the nominee subscribed to the Oath of a Witness and thereafter proceeded to respond to questions relating to his citizenship, records of his previous office (s) and issues connected with the position to which he had been nominated.
    The nominee's background information
    Hon Kwabena Donkor (Dr.) was born on 5th February, 1958 in Lonto via Yeji in the BrongAhafo Region. He had his elementary education at the defunct Yeji L/A No. 2 School. He attended Navrongo Secondary School for the GCE Ordinary Level Certificate from 1972 to 1977 and thereafter proceeded to the Labone Secondary School to obtain the GCE Advanced Level Certificate between 1977 and 1979.
    The nominee pursued further studies at the University of Bristol in the UK between 1991 and 1992 and was awarded a Master of Science Degree in Development, Administration and Planning. The nominee continued his postgraduate education at the same University and was awarded a Doctor of Philosophy in 1995. He further attended the Lancaster University, United Kingdom, where he graduated with a Master of Business Administration in
    1996.
    Dr Kwabena Donkor belongs to a number of professional associations. He is a member of the Chartered Institute of Energy, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Commerce and Industry and a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute.
    The nominee worked at the Office of the Provisional National Defence Council (PNDC) from 1982 to 1989. He later worked as a Research Assistant with the Africa Research and Information Bureau, London between 1990 and 1991. Between 1994 and 1995, the
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Ebo Barton-Odro) 11:45 a.m.
    nominee taught at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom. He was appointed the Consultant for the Divestiture Implementation Committee and later as the Director of the Graduate School of the Central University College.
    Dr Kwabena Donkor has worked in several capacities in the public service of Ghana. He was the first Chief Executive of the Bulk Oil Storage and Transportation Company (BOST) from 1998 to 2000. He also served as the Chief Executive Officer of the Petroleum Commission between 2011 and 2013. The nominee was appointed Deputy Minister for the Ministry of Energy and served in this capacity from 2009 to 2010.
    Dr Kwabena Donkor is currently the Member of Parliament for Pru East Constituency in the Brong Ahafo Region and the Chairman of the Committee on Mines and Energy.
    Nominee's responses to Questions
    The nominee provided the following responses to questions posed to him by Hon Members of the Committee at the public hearing: Position on the call to separate politics from energy issues
    When asked about his position on the call by a section of the public to divulge politics from issues concerning the country's energy matters, the nominee stated that politics is an act of governance and saw nothing wrong with it in relation to energy.
    He insisted however, that he will rather call for the separation of partisanship from energy issues since energy affects our very being as a nation. He stressed that when it comes to power concerns, there is no discrimination about one's political
    persuasion.
    He indicated that since the country requires speedy development, he would bring together energy experts from either side of the political divide in the country to build consensus on all matters concerning energy.
    Strategy to maximise power generation from the Akosombo Dam
    Responding to a question on his strategies to maximise the full potential of the Akosombo Dam, the nominee stated that the water level of the dam is climate -dependent. According to him, that explains why the country has been witnessing cyclical modes once almost every seven years.
    He added that having ascertained the set pattern of the dam, he was of the opinion that there was the need to plan how to complement generation from the dam with other sources of energy and emphasised that the country cannot continue to rely solely on energy from hydro sources.
    Regarding power generation from the Bui Dam, the nominee stated that the dam is a peaking plant and hence, meant to augment power supply during peak hours. He insisted that the contribution of the Bui Dam to the country's power pool should be recognised as such. He also stated that the country has exhausted all its hydro potentials and for that matter we should critically consider other sources of energy to increase the country's generation capacity.
    Causes of power challenges
    When asked about the causes of power challenges facing the country, the nominee stated that historically, the Akosombo Dam has been the bulwark of the country's energy generation and recalled that the dam initially generated sufficient energy to meet the country's energy demands and even left reserves for export. He however,
    stated that with the increase in population and economic activities in the country, demand for energy outstripped energy generation, thereby resulting in the current challenges.
    He was of the view that the inability of the country to keep pace with the increasing demand has resulted in the power challenges. He added that the country failed to invest early enough since energy development is long- term in nature. He insisted that we have failed as a nation to adequately invest in the power sector by constructing reservoirs, equipment and developing human resources.
    To address this, the nominee suggested that we should put in place the appropriate policy to attract Independent Power Producers (IPPs) into the power sector since the State alone cannot bear the colossal cost involved in power generation. He further stated that when given the nod, he will focus attention on renewables and to explore the possibility of using coal as a source of fuel to generate power. He suggested that ideally, every new house, especially real estate buildings should incorporate solar systems in their construction and also called for adopting appropriate measures to make power sector agencies, particularly the Electricity Company of Ghana more efficient.
    Strategies to achieve 5,000MW by 2016
    Regarding the strategies that he
    intends to adopt towards achieving the Government's target of 5,000MW of power by 2016, the nominee stated that he was aware that he would continue with ongoing projects and programmes currently being undertaken by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum. He cited for example, the ongoing project to turn all single cycle generation plants into dual
    cycle plants. He explained that by turning single cycle generation plant with the capacity plant of 110MW into a dual cycle generation plant, the amount of power to be produced would lead to an increase in power generation to 220MW.
    This, according to him, meant that we would be using the same amount of fuel to generate more energy and hence lower the cost of power generation. He further stated that he will also focus on other ongoing projects including areas under which feasibility and re-feasibility studies are being undertaken.
    Necessity for creating a new Ministry of Power
    In response to a question soliciting his view on the need for creating a new Ministry of Power from the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum, the nominee stated that authorities higher than him have considered it necessary after duly assessing relevant information on the ground and therefore, he has no cause to question the propriety of their decision to create the new Ministry. He also indicated that every nation at every point in time assesses its circumstances and takes appropriate actions to address them, one of which may be the creation of a new Ministry to specifically deal with the challenge.
    Ensuring just and reasonable access to electricity
    On measures to ensure just and reasonable access to electricity across the country as required by article 35(3) of the 1992 Constitution, the nominee stated that if found worthy by the House, he would address the imbalance in access to electricity. He was of the opinion that electricity is no longer meant for domestic comfort but rather used as a critical tool for production and hence must be seen as such. To this end, he assured the

    Committee that he would intensify efforts to expand electricity to the northern part of the country and at the same time, work to address the increasing need for electricity at the southern part of the country.

    Regarding how he would extend electricity to satellite communities such as those in the Yagaba/Kubori District in the Northern Region, the nominee stated that in such areas, it would be prudent to consider using stand-alone generation systems as a means of providing electricity since the provision of electricity through the grid is more expensive.

    Determinants of electricity tariffs

    In answering a question relating to factors that influence the fixing of electricity tariffs, the nominee elected to speak generally on the issue since there is an independent body established with the mandate of fixing electricity tariffs.

    He stated that issues such as return on investment, fuel sources and efficiency of generating assets generally affect tariffs. He also stated that exchange rate is a critical factor which influences electricity tariffs since most inputs used in energy generation are imported and therefore, dollar-denominated.

    Addressing the power challenges

    The nominee accepted the view that the energy challenges had become endemic and believed that the fundamental issue has to do with under-investment. He explained that the country has failed to invest adequately in equipment, human resources, ICT and systems and hence the challenge that we find ourselves faced with.

    He assured the Committee that if he is given the nod, he would bring together energy experts and persons with sufficient experience in the power industry to help

    find a sustainable solution to the petroleum sector as short- term solutions tend to be unsuccessful.

    Impact of the current tariff structure on industry

    The nominee accepted the fact that the implementation of the current tariff structure has an adverse impact on industry. This is because industrial users pay more for electricity than their domestic counterparts under the current tariff structure and that has contributed partly to the unprofitability and collapse of some companies in the country. He informed the Committee that since he became aware of the situation, he has become an ardent advocate for the change in accordance with the international norm which makes industrial users pay lower tariffs than domestic users.

    As part of his campaign in this regard, the nominee also disclosed that the Committee on Mines and Energy had engaged the PURC on the issue during his chairmanship of the Committee and the Commission has accepted to gradually phase out the current tariff structure. Addressing challenges associated with the use of pre-paid metres

    In his answer to a question relating to the issue that the introduction of pre- paid metres has led to an increase in the cost of electricity, the nominee stated that the perception of the increased cost of electricity may be due to the fact that the post-paid metering system has been implemented for over 20 years and such metres have never been recalibrated, leading to under-billing for electricity consumed. By this, bills became artificially low, such that with the adoption of the pre- paid metres, it appeared they were being charged more than previously.

    The nominee, however, assured the Committee that he will task the Energy Commission to conduct a study to unravel

    any difficulty that the introduction of the pre-paid metering system has caused, for his attention and possible policy direction.

    Ensuring effective power rationing programmes

    Responding to a question on how to effectively plan power rationing to avoid causing damage to industrial machines and raw materials, the nominee stated that the challenge militating against the effective rationing of power could be blamed partly on the siting of industries within residential neighbourhoods. He explained that under such situations, it becomes very difficult to plan in such a way to isolate industries and prioritise them during power rationing programmes.

    He cited an example of an industrial enclave in Tema visited by the Select Committee on Mines and Energy where for over three months industries in the enclave experienced only six hours of power outage during a power rationing period. As a way of addressing this challenge, he suggested that the country's spatial planners must plan for industrial parks to assist in addressing challenges with future power rationing programmes.

    Measures to address challenges associated with the performance of thermal plants

    In his response to how he would address challenges associated with performance of thermal plants to maximise the country's energy generation capacity, the nominee noted that there is the need to ensure fuel and plant availability to enhance their performance. He informed the Committee that as at the day of the public hearing, the Gas Processing Plant at Atuabo had the capacity to deliver 52mmscf of gas but could not do so due to plant unavailability in the Aboadze corridor. He further

    explained that even though some of the thermal plants were designed to run on both gas and light crude oil, the high frequency of switching fuels has led to frequent maintenance schedules which has also reduced the availability of the plants.

    He assured the Committee that he will work with the power generation companies such as VRA and the independent power producers to co-ordinate their plant maintenance activities with emphasis on where priorities ought to be in order to improve upon plant availability.

    Again, he said we would hold discussion with the officials of VRA to run the thermal plants at Aboadze corridor on Atuabo gas, which will give some fiscal space to VRA to be able to buy light crude oil to fuel the plants at the Tema corridor.

    Revamping T3 Thermal Plant

    It was observed that the T3 thermal plant with a capacity of 120MW has never worked to its inauguration of the plant by His Excellency the President. On how the nominee would revamp the plant in order to reap the benefits in addressing the current generation challenge, the nominee indicated that he was aware of an investigation commissioned by the Hon Minister for Energy and Petroleum to unravel the deficiencies with the plant. And if given the nod by this august House, he will study the report of the investigation team and accordingly implement its recommendations to ensure not only that the T3 Thermal Plant is put in operation but that other generating assets of the State are dealt with in similar vein.

    Collection of bills from newly connected communities

    The nominee indicated that the challenge of collecting bills by the ECG in newly connected communities is as a result of inadequate co-ordination between the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum and ECG during the execution of the Self
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg second the Motion.
    Question proposed.
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Hon Member for Manhyia South?
    Dr Matthew Opoku Prempeh (NPP
    - Manhyia South): Mr Speaker, I find that Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor who has been nominated by His Excellency the President for the Ministry of Power to be probably one of the Ministers we have considered who has such in-depth knowledge into the position in which he is going to serve this country.
    Mr Speaker, that Ministry he is going to superintend has a lot of challenges in this country. Ghanaians sleep and wake up and talk about issues relating to this Ministry and I hope that knowledge would translate into action for the betterment of Ghana.
    Mr Speaker, it is interesting that even while deliberating in this House, we could experience that phenomenon an Hon Colleague described as “adundum adundum”. If we do not solve our power situation in this country, no matter the International Monetary Fund (IMF) bailouts, no matter national fiscal stabilisation levies, no matter the 17.5 per cent you put on fuel, no matter what we do as a country, we cannot make headway.
    I hope and pray that Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor, who says politics is out of
    governance, would not go and play politics to develop and better the power situation, would not introduce unnecessary partisanship into the power situation in this country; would be very realistic in giving dates in which this “adundum adundum” would stop.
    rose
    Mr Speaker 11:45 a.m.
    Hon Member for Ningo- Prampram, are you on a point of order?
    Mr E. T. Mensah 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want the Hon Member to explain “adundum adundum”. And what language it is?
    Thank you.
    Dr Prempeh 11:45 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, “adundum adundum” is a phenomenon recorded by the Hon Member for Tamale, Haruna Iddrisu in describing the power situation in a certain year.
    Some Hon Members 11:45 a.m.
    In which year?
    Dr Prempeh 11:45 a.m.
    In describing the power situation in 2007, promising the people of Ghana that in the advent of an NDC Government, which he was sure, and true to his words, the NDC Government came to power, there would be no excuse for “adundum adundum”.
    Mr Speaker, my point is that, Hon Haruna Iddrisu, in promising that the next NDC Government had no excuse - We never expected that the “dumsor dumsor” would become “adundum adundum”.
    Mr Speaker, now the “adundum adundum” is so pervasive that in the middle of surgeries, the “adundum adundum” is even preventing hospitals from conducting surgeries. This “adundum adundum” that is preventing the President from staying here--
    Mr Speaker, the Hon nominee should
    rose rose
    Dr Prempeh 11:55 a.m.
    He has travelled to Qatar, he has travelled to the United Arab Emirates (UAE), he has travelled far and wide, learning from the experience of developing and developed countries - how they solve their power crisis. You do not solve power crisis by commitments that cannot be sustained. We solve power crisis in countries by establishing plans that can prevent “adundum adundum”.
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 11:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, yesterday, I noticed that on many
    occasions, the Hon Hajia Alijata got up to make interventions. On many occasions, she could not register on the radar of the presiding persons. May I plead - because she has already got up on two occasions that you notice her and allow her to make her intervention.
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    Hon Minority Leader, you are completely out of order.
    Dr Prempeh 11:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon nominee, as the Hon Chairman of the Committee on Mines and Energy of this House, has had the occasion of examining to depth the power situation in this country. He should give this House a commitment; he should let this House believe that this is a nominee that is going to deliver something for this country.
    The expectations on his shoulders, the expectations in Ghanaians, in Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor, cannot falter. If he does falter, then it is the President and his Hon nominee who would go down as people who talk and do not work.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah (NPP - Sekondi) 11:55 a.m.
    Thank you very much, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to contribute to the debate that this House approves the Fourteenth Report of the Appointments Committee on His Excellency the President's nomination of Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor as Hon Minister designate for the Ministry of Power.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Colleague has an extremely pleasant personality, I must say and is one Hon Member whom, during this relatively short time, established the rapport with Hon Colleagues opposite. It is a good thing and I hope that the confidence which the President has reposed in him by this appointment, would not be misplaced. And I say this advisedly because if there is one appointment, which the President has not explained but any ordinary person observing the political scene, will say that ‘well, probably, the President wants Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor
    to deliver us from darkness.”
    Having said that, Mr Speaker, as I stand here, I am not aware that there is a Ministry of Power; it is the power of the President to establish Ministries. In this Report, I thought that the Committee would make a finding - because it is by Executive Instrument and normally, Executive Instruments are Executive actions not in the nature of -
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    Hon Member, for the records, I have seen a copy of the Executive Instrument.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, of course, you are Mr Speaker. But we, as Hon Members of Parliament, are supposed to approve this nomination -
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    Yes, I agree entirely with you.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:55 a.m.
    And appropriate funds -
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    It has been gazetted and once it is gazetted, my understanding is that, it is notice to the whole world. The Executive Instrument has been gazetted, just for the records.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:55 a.m.
    But Mr Speaker, you see, we never receive gazette notifications. You were an Hon Member of this House before assuming this august Chair. I am hoping that henceforth, if the President designates and re-designates Ministries, his Leader, the Hon Leader of his business in this House, would bring it to the attention of Hon Members.
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    I agree entirely with you but that is a different issue. I am only informing you that it is there. The other point you are making, that the House should be informed, I agree with you on that score. I am only informing the House - [Interruption.]
    Indeed, I requested for the Executive Instrument before I did the Communica- tion to the House of his nomination.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 11:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, well, I do not know whether this was part of your job. But it is because of your experience as an Hon Member of Parliament, that is why you requested for that information and I am grateful.
    Mr Speaker 11:55 a.m.
    Hon Member for Sekondi, for the same reason that you are raising, how do I communicate to the House about a Ministry that does not exist in law?
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 12:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, ordinarily, the President, under the Constitution, is a Minister of State, but once he has decided to designate it to a Ministry, that raises that issue. But I am grateful for the information from the Chair.
    But I was thinking that in this case, as part of its findings, the Committee would state that indeed, the President has created a Ministry of Power; and that is why he is designating a Minister of State to be a Minister at the Ministry of Power.
    I do not want Mr Speaker to be drawn into this debate because Mr Speaker knows that we cannot draw him into a debate. We can never debate Mr Speaker; when he speaks, it is final. If we want to challenge him, we would have to come by way of Motion and we never want to do that.
    Mr Speaker, my Hon Leader has commented on something but I am not going to put it on record; it is between the two of you. I am not drawing him into your debate but I know that you and the Hon Leader go very far back. But now that
    Mr Speaker 12:05 p.m.
    Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Alfred K. Agbesi (NDC - Ashaiman) 12:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I also beg to contribute to the Motion to approve the nominee as the Minister for Manpower. [Uproar.]
    rose
    Mr Speaker 12:05 p.m.
    Hon Minister for Youth and Sports?
    Mr Ayariga 12:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do not understand why the noise. This is because the nominee is a man, and the Ministry he is going to is for power. So, it becomes “manpower.” [Laughter]
    Mr Speaker 12:05 p.m.
    Hon Minister, you are completely out of order. [Laughter.]
    Mr Agbesi 12:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I thank you for the correction.
    I beg to contribute to the Motion and urge my Hon Colleagues to approve the nominee as Minister for the Ministry of Power, without “ man”.
    Mr Speaker, we know the nominee in this House; we know what he is capable of doing, particularly when he was the Chairman of the Committee on Mines and Energy. We hope that having caught the eyes of the President as regards his nomination, he would contribute more to
    the several efforts and numerous plans that the President has to make this Ministry effective and give Ghanaians enough energy and power.
    Mr Speaker, the nominee, a doctor, of course, has performed creditably in this House, and there is no doubt in my mind that when we approve him, all that is happening in the country that everybody everywhere is asking for supply of energy and supply of power, would be a thing that during his term as Minister, these problems and challenges are reduced to the barest minimum.
    Mr Speaker, I would urge that -- as he said in his vetting, the issue of energy or power has been a thing that has been happening in the country for many years. In 2007, we were in this House, when the current Minister for Employment and Labour Relations brought a half-hour Motion on the issue of energy crisis in the country. Our Brothers on the other side assured us that we should only exercise patience, and that within a short time, the energy crisis would be over.
    Mr Speaker, in 2007, after the debate, we went and 2008 came, and that was why the nominee said the issue of challenges and problems of supply is not a two- day matter. It has been happening in the country over the years. All that is necessary is that, all of us should support the President in finding solutions to the power problem in the country, and we should leave criticism -- for the sake of criticism and give chance to the Minister- designate and to the President to do all that is necessary for the matter on power to be a thing of the past.
    Mr Speaker, I would urge all of us that the nominee is someone that when we give him the chance, he would go and do what is necessary, and more power would flow
    and flow and flow.
    Mr Speaker, I thank you for the opportunity.
    Mr Speaker 12:05 p.m.
    Hon Members, I have taken note of the sense of the House from the comments so far, so I would call the Hon Member for Sunyani West and Deputy Minority Chief Whip.
    Mr Ignatius B. Awuah (NPP - Sunyani West) 12:05 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for giving me the opportunity to contribute to the debate on the floor.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon nominee is somebody that I personally know. He happens to be from my region, and I have known him for quite a number of years. He is somebody who is capable of handling the work being assigned him by His Excellency the President.
    Mr Speaker, I have no doubt in my mind that he would be able to deliver. But in doing so, I would want to bring his attention to the fact that, unlike many of our Colleagues who were born and bred in cities, in his case, he was brought up in a typical rural area like myself. So, the issue of rural electrification is something that we would want him to take serious. As he goes to the Ministry, yes, the pressures from the cities are high, but even in an attempt to settle that, he should not forget the millions of Ghanaians who are also living in the rural areas.
    We need to boost up rural industries; we need to get more people to stay in the rural areas as against drifting to the urban centres, and perhaps, one way of achieving that is to make sure that, we extend power to most of these communities. I would want to urge him to let that be his focus and make sure that within the term that he stays in that particular Ministry, if

    there is anything at all that Ghanaians are going to remember him for, it would be his dedication to extend electricity to the rural areas.

    I wish him well and I would want to say that people like his friends from the region, and of course, people who also believe that he is capable of handling that particular Ministry, are people he can fall on for advice any time he wants.

    Mr Speaker, I am done.
    Mr Speaker 12:15 p.m.
    Hon Yieleh Chireh, Hon Member for Nhyiaeso and then Hon Member for Tema East, please, be very brief because we want to move to the estimates.
    Mr Joseph Y. Chireh (NDC - Wa West) 12:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am a member of the Committee, so, I will be very brief.
    The statement I would want to make has to do with the earlier issue which was raised by the Hon Member for Sekondi. One of the things that happen is that, we are given copies of almost all the legislations that are passed, as Members of Parliament. Unfortunately, we do not get Executive Instruments and Executive Instruments are powers that we, as a House, have conferred on, particularly Ministers to issue.
    What I would urge is that, the Clerk, together with the Attorney-General's Department should make sure that any Executive Instrument that is issued, is also given to Members of Parliament, to be fully aware of what is going on in terms of that.
    The nominee has vast experience and all I would call for, is teamwork when he gets to the Ministry. This is because no matter how much one knows, one cannot
    do everything alone. He assured us that, he was going to even get people from across the political divide to help him to resolve some of the teething problems in the proposed Ministry.
    The most important thing for all of us, is to be realistic about demands. But one of the things that he said, which was very significant, is about the support for industry, and the need for households to depend more on solar energy, more than the powered one from either hydro or thermal production. If he pursues that line, we would have a better arrangement, so that we can assure the industries that use a lot of energy that they will continue to function and people would be employed.
    Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
    Dr Richard W. Anane (NPP - Nhyiaeso) 12:15 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for giving me the opportunity to associate with the comments with respect to the nomination of our Colleague, the Hon Member of Parliament.
    I join my Hon Colleagues to congratulate him for attracting the attention of the Presidency to be nominated in the first place. I also wish to draw his attention to the fact that, the position that he is going to occupy is onerous; he will have a lot of problems and he must be prepared to meet them. I am sure even from what Hon Members are saying here and from what he was confronted with during his interview with the Appointments Committee, he would have realised that he is going to get a lot of requests from Hon Members of Parliament.
    But the problem per se as he himself accepts, is a problem that must be resolved across the political divide. I would wish to draw his attention and wish that he gets emboldened to take these measures. The problem of inadequacy of power supply,
    the problem of recurrent interruptions in power supply, maybe, from two angles, one from supply, and the other one from transmission, where the transmission also has its problem. But the major problem as we are facing right now, is the problem of supply. Because of that, I would want to draw his attention to - and I do believe government is also taking it up - the need for this country and for his leadership to be bold enough to go forward to ensure that we implement our attention and our move towards getting a nuclear energy plant. Not just one or two but to position this country to be able to supply the entire sub-region with energy.
    Mr Speaker, you do hear from certain quarters, based on maybe, misconceptions and others, about the fear for nuclear energy. But Ghana can position herself like France and Korea to be able to supply this energy. It is not for nothing that way back in 2006 and 2007, the College for Nuclear Energy was established so that we can start putting across or at least, training our manpower. Mr Speaker, I do know that from the year 2001, the President Kufuor‘s Administration was grappling with the question of nuclear energy.
    I am told in 2005, President Kufuor appointed a committee, which came up with a report and this report was advising Government to focus, so that at the end of the day, by 2018, we could have reached the point of producing nuclear energy. It does not matter -- new governments must have to look at them. But I do believe that, the Hon Minister must be given the support and the assurance that nuclear energy, just like any other, even hydro, kills. Even the cars that we ride in daily kill but we keep on riding in them.
    The problem is not the killing but that if we are able to prepare ourselves appropriately, we would be able to supply this country with uninterrupted power. This is because as a middle income country, we are looking towards improving our transportation system, extending the railway lines to the North, ensuring that our airlines and airports function 24 hours a day, that industries can produce and work 24 hours a day.
    Mr Speaker, all these things can be assured if we have constant supply of energy. And one of the major assurances of getting constant supply of energy is through that.
    That is why I would want to associate with this and then urge our Colleague to be emboldened to go forward and do that.
    Mr Mutawakilu Adam (NDC - Damongo) 12:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to contribute to the Motion moved by the Hon Chairman of the Appointments Committee on the approval of the President's nominee.
    I have worked with the President's nominee when he was the Chairman of the Committee on Mines and Energy for the past two years. And it was very clear that he is a man who has the technical knowhow; he has the experience, the knowledge and the commitment to ensure that the energy and petroleum sector in Ghana works.
    It is also good to know that this is the third time he is heading, as a pioneer, a Ministry, departments or agencies (MDA), as the first was the first Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Bulk Oil Storage and Transportation (BOST). And in the course of my work as a member of the Committee on Mines and Energy, it became clear that the foundation that he laid during his term as the CEO of BOST, is still what is keeping BOST going and it has been
    Mr Mutawakilu Adam (NDC - Damongo) 12:25 p.m.


    admitted by most of the staff at BOST.

    The second was the Petroleum Commission that was established in 2011, of which he became the first Chief Executive Officer (CEO). As we speak, it is normally very uncommon to see within a matter of two to three years, a Commission like the Petroleum Commission having a mighty building as we see over there. There are several Commissions and Corporations that have existed for more than 10 years without a proper office accommodation. Through his efforts, today, within three years, the edifice that we see is something that every leader should emulate.

    The third one is his nomination to head the Power Ministry; this is the first Ministry. And with the knowledge he has in the power sector, I have no doubt tht with teamwork and cooperation, the 5,000 megawatts that has been promised by the Government by 2016 is something that is very achievable.

    Secondly, while achieving access to electricity, I would like to urge, if the House approves him, to also look at the Solar Lantern Programme that the Government is launchinhg, to ensure that those communities which may not be able to get electricity within the next five to 10 years, are provided with the solar lanterns, so that at least, dependence on kerosene will be less, and therefore, Government will be able to scrap full subsidies on kerosene.

    On this note, Mr Speaker, I thank you very muchy for giving me this opportunity.

    Daniel Nii Kwartei Titus-Glover

    (NPP -- Tema East): Mr Speaker, I equally beg to support the President's nominee to the Ministry of Power, in the person of Dr Kwabena Donkor. His relationship, M Speaker, during my short stay in this House, is commendable. In going to the new Ministry, I believe that with this relationship that he has built with House, he would definitely work with the very people he is going to meet in that new Ministry.

    Mr Speaker, the energy crisis has become an albatross round the neck of this Government and as I walk through Tema- Manhea, through Community One and Industrial Area, the cost to domestic lives and industrial purposes is so phenomenal and people are asking themselves questions on how soon this problem can go. I believe that, for him to catch the eye of the President, speaks volumes. Ghanaians are not going to take any excuses anymore; all we want is to have our lights on; the industries are turning their machines to produce, to make sure we can contribute to our Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth.

    Mr Speaker, during the vetting, the attention of the nominee was drawn to article 35(3) of the Constitution, that talks about how the state can promote a just and reasonable access to State facilities and services. In his response, he did say that, he was coming to look at some of these imbalances in the provision of power throughout the country.

    The issue about faulty machines and these credit cards to our electricity -- talking about calibrations -- his attention was also drawn to that and he did assure the Committee that it was something he would look at to make sure that the services that the Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG) renders to our people are of perfect admiration.

    Mr Speaker, and the fact that he

    also talked about the use of the human resources from both sides of the political divide, that is also very good and we need to watch him very carefully. This is because if he wants to de-link politics from these energy crises and the understanding of his assurance that he is going to fall on past hands that have worked in this Ministry, I think that the experiences that they have would be brought on board to enable him do this job.

    In answering some of these -
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    Hon Member, please, wind up. Please, conclude.
    Nii Kwartei Titus-Glover: Mr Speaker, as part of the causes of the energy crises, I would urge my Colleague and nominee, that the Volta River Authority (VRA) is owing so much on the crude supplies and so, he should make sure that they pay and give us the light.
    Finally, as we discuss the Budget Statement, unfortunately, Mr Speaker, there is no provision for him in the new Ministry that he is going. But he has my support and please, he should not forget this House and I believe that God willing, he would be able to deliver.
    Thank you very much, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity.
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    Hon Members, I did indicate that, after the Hon Member for Tema, I would want to put the Question. We have to make progress. I know a number of people would want to speak.
    rose
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    Hon Asiamah, I know you are a member of the Appointments Committee and your Chairman has presented your Report.
    Hon Members, we must be prepared to leave here at 12.00 midnight. Yes, I told the Leaders in my Lobby that if you are interested in the debate on the floor, you must be prepared to leave here at 12.00 midnight because we must be able to clear a lot of things. We all know that tomorrow, we cannot do a lot of work here in the House -- 12.00 midnight. Are you ready?

    Very well. Then let me take Hon Asiamah; he has made an earlier indication. Then I will take you.

    Brief comments, Hon Asiamah.
    Mr Isaac K. Asiamah (NPP - Atwima- Mponua) 12:25 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Our Colleague, the nominee obviously has a lot of experience --
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    Hon Asiamah, you have two minutes. [Laughter.]
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 12:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to refer to page 8 of the Report, under the sub-headline “Measures to address challenges associated with the performance of thermal plants”.
    But Mr Speaker, here, there is the talk about the need to fuel and the plants availability to enhance their performance.
    Mr Speaker, I believe the challenge is enormous and we need to take actions that are far reaching. But Mr Speaker, I think for some of us on the Committee of Mines and Energy, we are aware that we have thermal plants. The challenge is about fuel availability.
    Mr Speaker, as we enter this yuletide, the prayer of Ghanaians is that Government should commit, at least, more resources to get us enough fuel to power the plants, so that at least, Ghanaians would have
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    Thank you very much, for being brief.
    Mr Samuel Atta Akyea (NPP-- Abuakwa South) 12:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would also be very brief with respect to that --
    Mr Speaker 12:25 p.m.
    Hon Member, after that I will allow you.
    Mr Akyea 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am grateful.

    It is surprising, in my view, that when the National Democratic Congress (NDC)

    had the opportunity during the time of ex- President John Evans Atta Mills of blessed memory, he had faith in the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum to function. What became of him? And why is it that he has just been found to come and sort of do this fire fighting? I do not think we should treat the energy situation of this country in this ambulance way.

    I humbly hold the view that, if we believe that power is critical for the economy, this on-the-spot adjustment mentality of this Government is not going to help us. So, I do not know what my Brother is going to do in this emergency crisis when he has not got a budget; and we are only praying that he would be able to put out the fires.

    But the significance, in my opinion, also, is what he said when he was being vetted, that if we pay lip service to power generation, this emergency situation would come again. Mr Speaker, this is very important. If we are not a country where our priority is power, and monies are blown in other areas of no significance, when serious monies of this nation are spirited away in misadventures - the Savannah Accelerated Development Authority (SADA), the Ghana Youth Employment and Entrepreneurial Development Agency (GYEEDA) and the rest of them - we would not invest money where it matters, I am afraid, if you brought Albert Einstein on the scene, we would have the same problem.

    So, my Hon Colleague was stressing that, if this Government believes in where it matters in the economy, then investment should go there; monies should be channelled. All the kinds of infrastructure we need to ensure-- that we are always coming back -- the power generation is subject to the vagaries of the weather as if we have become like the typical bird, that since we started making a particular mode of nest, we would not change. So, where is our innovative skills

    in trying to resolve this matter?

    I am afraid, it is not the man who is going to bring the magic wand in solving this problem. It is our sense of priority and our sense of investment which are going to help him. He could have all the competence relating to where he is going but if he has not got the wherewithal, I am afraid, Mr Speaker, it will be another appointment whose results will be almost negligible.

    I also recommend that this House should approve his nomination. He has the competence but he has challenges.

    Alhaji Ibrahim Dey Abubakar - rose
    - 12:35 p.m.

    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Be brief.
    Alhaji Ibrahim D. Abubakar 12:35 p.m.
    Very brief -
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Two minutes -
    Alhaji Ibrahim D. Abubakar (NDC--Salaga South) 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker; just two minutes?
    Actually, I was - In fact, I was just going to add my voice to the last speaker, that his capabilities alone are not enough to salvage whatever is going on. But the Government cannot have that if we are really not investing enough money and resources into that particular Ministry. Then we might as well not create it as a Ministry.
    He is capable alright but with the needed resources and priorities that power
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader? Minority Leader (Mr Osei Kyei-
    Mensah-Bonsu): Mr Speaker, thank you for the opportunity to also lend my voice to supporting the Report from the Appointments Committee in respect of the approval of the nominee, the Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor.
    But Mr Speaker, before I proceed, I believe, going forward as a House, we need to consider whether it is appropriate when an Hon Member is nominated for a position and we come to discuss the suitability, the appropriateness or otherwise of the Hon Member to occupy a particular position, that Hon Member should sit in.
    Mr Speaker, I believe that pursuant to best practices -
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    I know you are a very courageous man. So, whether the Hon Member is sitting there or not, I know that you have the capability of saying whatever you would want to say.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:35 p.m.
    Absolutely. But Mr Speaker, in formulating laws, we are always minded to say that, at meetings where matters of interest relate to particular persons serving on, say, any boards, they must necessarily recuse themselves. So, I am saying that, it perhaps, may be important for us going forward as a Parliament to consider that. Be that as it may, by convention, we have allowed them to sit in. So, I do not mind if the Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor sits in. After all, other Hon Members have already contributed.
    437914th Report of the 18 December, 2014 Appointments C'ttee 43804377 14th Report of the 18 December, 2014 Appointments C'ttee
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Clerk, those doors are actually special ones--emergency doors. I agree with you. So, the Clerk should take note and direct the Marshall to do what is right. I entirely agree with the Hon Minority Leader on this matter.
    rose
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Why? [Interruption.] He has not finished contributing.
    Is it on the door?
    Mr Ayariga 12:35 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker. About the doors - The reason they are almost always open is that the seats - when you enter through that door and you have to manoeuvre-- to get to your seat, it inconveniences a lot of Hon Members, and so, it is easier -
    Mr Speaker 12:35 p.m.
    Yes, but that is a different matter. Should it be that anybody at all can enter at any time? That is the security concern that we are raising. You are raising the inconvenience aspect; I am addressing the security aspect. So, we should find a way of addressing both the inconvenience and the security aspects.
    Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, thank you.
    The Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor is the latest or is going to be the latest addition, if approved by this House, to the present list of Ministers and Deputy Ministers. I do not know what is going to be his number. Is it number 85 or 86 to the list of Ministers of State and Deputy Ministers?

    Mr Speaker, in 2011, when we started pumping petroleum, I indicated that it would be important going forward, if we achieved some level of production of petroleum products to perhaps, create a Ministry to be solely responsible for petroleum and divest it from the other concerns of the Ministry of Energy. So, today, if we have a Ministry responsible solely for Power, I would go for that, except that I am not too sure that when a country is able to produce just around hundred thousand barrels of petroleum - at that level - we may need two different Ministries.

    If we are at the level of maybe 250,000 to 300,000, I would think that we would need a completely new Ministry to cater for petroleum affairs. I am not too sure at the level where we are operating now that we need another Ministry altogether.

    Be that as it may, Mr Speaker, the Executive Instrument - and I notice that the nominee was nominated before the Instrument, which created that Ministry came into existence - but Mr Speaker, the Executive Instrument itself

    is problematic. The wording is that, in item 4, we substituted the Ministry for the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum for Ministry of Energy. So, now, the new name of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum is Ministry of Energy.

    The new Ministry then is the Ministry of Power. So, we have Ministry of Energy and Ministry of Power. Is power energy or it is not?

    Mr Speaker, if you are not careful, going forth -
    Mr Speaker 12:45 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader, yes, it is a very important point that you are raising. I saw that but later on, I tried to get clarification on the matter. The Hon Attorney-General and Minister for Justice is here; I do not know whether she would want to provide explanation on this matter. It is a very important point that the Hon Minority Leader has raised.
    Mrs Marietta Brew Appiah-Opong 12:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Executive Instrument signed by His Excellency the President stated Ministry of Energy and Petroleum or Ministry of Petroleum and by the addition to the list of Ministries of the Civil Service of the following, Ministry of Power.
    So, it should be Ministry of Power and Ministry of Petroleum but from the publication in the Gazette, they made an error which we drew their attention to and it was corrected. But what was actually signed by His Excellency the President, the Executive Instrument, is Ministry of Petroleum and Ministry of Power. So, that has been corrected.
    Mr Speaker 12:45 p.m.
    Yes, I saw it and I drew
    their attention and said that when they realised the Government printer made a mistake - they quickly corrected that. In fact, I have in my hand-- [Interruption] - Yes, I have seen that one. I have in my hand the one that says the Civil Service Ministries Instrument 2013, E.I. is amended as follows:
    a) In item 4 by the substitution for Ministry of Energy and Petroleum of Ministry of Petroleum and by the addition to the list of Ministries of the Civil Service of the Ministry of Power.
    But what they have there is Ministry of Energy - [Interruption] - So, you are absolutely right.
    So, when I pointed it, out, the Attorney- General and Minister for Justice explained that it was the Government printer which could have made a mistake but what the President actually signed was Ministry of Petroleum and Ministry of Power.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we go back to the basics -
    Mr Speaker 12:45 p.m.
    We all make mistakes.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:45 p.m.
    If maybe, they had been channelled through Leader of Government Business, these things would not perhaps, have arisen.
    Mr Speaker, if I may, the Executive Instrument that I hold in my hand is E.I. 134; Mr Speaker, what is the number of the E.I. that you are holding?
    Mr Speaker 12:45 p.m.
    It is E.I. 134 because that one really is a substitution.
    Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 12:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to clarify one issue with regard to
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 12:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Majority Leader has referred to me but I would want to say that I was Majority Leader and Minister for Parliamentary Affairs from October, 2001 to mid-April, 2003 --2001, October to mid-April, 2003, when I assumed the Office of Attorney-General and Minister for Justice. [Hear! Hear!]
    Mr Bagbin 12:45 p.m.
    Thank you very much. Because I was then the Minority Leader and I worked with you. I cannot recall anytime you brought an Executive Instrument to this House as Majority Leader and Minister for Parliamentary Affairs. Now, he insists that it is my duty to bring the Executive Instruments to - [Interruption.]
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 12:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I said -
    Mr Speaker 12:45 p.m.
    Have you caught my eye? [Interruption]
    Anyway, let me hear you.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 12:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, all that I said was that, as Leader of Government Business, he should ensure that Members of Parliament get copies of Executive Instruments just as we get Legislative Instruments (L.I.s) and

    Oh, I see.

    The Hon Member says he does not have that designation in addition to his position as Hon Majority Leader. I wonder who leads Government Business in this House. The Speaker always asks him.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, these are interesting times.
    The Hon Majority Leader seems to be divesting himself of some other responsibilities but we will go on.
    Mr Speaker, the issue that has even arisen out of this is much more serious than maybe - What it means is that, we have two Executive Instruments bearing the same number but with different contents. And it gets dangerous for the health of this Government. Happily, the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice is here. Mr Speaker -
    Mr Speaker 12:45 p.m.
    If you make a mistake and you correct it -- by what you are saying now, we know which is the genuine one. That is why you are raising it. But I think you are making a very interesting legal argument.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is not that simplistic; remember in 2012, we had a similar occurrence with respect to the Electoral Commission. And it came with a different numbering. Today, it is the Attorney-General's Department and Ministry of Justice; do you think this is right?
    Mr Speaker, what is the date of notification on the one that -
    Mr Speaker 12:45 p.m.
    You cannot ask questions -- [Laughter] - So, I will not respond to any question from you. [Laughter.] But I think that, as I said earlier, I have observed
    it and I tried to find out myself. We have got the details. So, whatever remedial measures that we need to take to address the concern you raised have to be taken as early as possible.
    So, I have taken your point on board; it is a very legitimate point and I have taken it on board. So, we move to the next point.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, not only should the House take it on board, we should ferry it to the headquarters of -
    Mr Speaker 12:45 p.m.
    Yes, move to the next point. [Laughter.]
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker,
    the other issues relate to the Government's own declared intent of making the economy an export-led one.
    Mr Speaker, making it an export-led economy, certainly, would so much depend on our energy supplies and availability at any given time. The emphasis on medium- term and long-term solutions that far, good as they are, in the midst of the power outages, we need to resort to emergency solutions. That is the supply of emergency power and that is what will save us and give us some reprieve in this period of shortages.

    Mr Speaker, that is not it.

    The Hon Majority Leader said that the dam had become so shallow that they needed to spill off. That was not

    the reason. We were talking about the expectation of greater rainfalls and they spilled away - Mr Speaker, I needed to respond to what the Hon Majority Leader said. But Mr Speaker, I think that the Hon Minister should cause a study -
    Mr Speaker 12:55 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 12:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am being misquoted and I need to-- to quote my good Friend, Hon Papa Owusu-Ankomah “set the record straight” [Laughter]
    I did not say that the dam was or is shallow and because of that they had to spill the water away. No! I said because the dams are shallow, they are not able to contain the water and they rise up to dangerous levels and they have to have this spillage. I said we needed to dredge the dams, but not that
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 12:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do not see what is different from what I said and attributed to the Hon Majority Leader and his own response. But I think the burden should be on the new Hon Minister to cause a study to be done in this, because it was about the integrity of the dam last year; the fear that if we had further accumulation of waters in the impoundment, they may affect the integrity of the dam and so, they did the spillage.
    And I am saying, when they did that, the rain ceased. That is affecting us and I believe it is one of the reasons we have such low water levels in the dam today.
    Mr Speaker, the cost of power generation in some of these generation plants by the Independent Power Producers (IPPs) is something that should have been investigated. I am aware that the one which came to the House two weeks back in respect of the latest one, that is also located at Aboadze, the calculations that came to the House, makes it very reasonable.
    438714th Report of the 18 December, 2014 Appointments C'ttee 4385 14th Report of the 18 December, 2014 Appointments C'ttee
    When we talk about base level generation of about 12 cents, it is most reasonable. If others are doing the business around 17, 18 and 19 cents, then we should be careful about that. We should be careful about resorting to such generation units when the cost of production is going to be so high for us. It should not be power at all cost, even though we need power; because there are better and more efficient ways of generating power at a lower cost, and that should be our priority. This is because our people are not sufficiently resourced to be able to pay and if the cost of generation is so high, chances are that there would be a lot of defaults in the system when we produce them.
    Mr Speaker, people have spoken about the competence of Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor and that may not be in doubt. What may be in doubt is the appropriate prioritisation from Government, which is not being done now. We believe that, perhaps, with his inclusion in the team, he may be able to refocus Government's attention on the priority areas rather than leading ourselves astray and then coming back to complain that we are not able to generate enough power or energy to propel agriculture and industry. It is because we are not able to do these things, that is why employment lags behind and food security is even threatened. Some people may not admit it but that is the reality of the times.
    Mr Speaker, on that note, I would want to support the Report from the Committee and to urge all of us to approve the nomination of the Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor.
    Mr Speaker 12:55 p.m.
    Thank you very much, Hon Minority Leader.
    Hon First Deputy Speaker and Chairman of the Appointments Committee, do you want to wind up? Otherwise, I will put the Question.
    Mr Barton-Oduro 12:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, just to thank Hon Members for the contributions they have made to the Report and also
    to mention that we made copies of the Instrument available to Hon Members of the Committee before proceedings started.
    Mr Speaker 12:55 p.m.
    Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    On my own behalf and on behalf of this august House, I send congratulations to the Hon Member and we wish him well in his new endeavour.
    But while seated here, you heard the comments on the floor of the House. So much is expected of you and that is all I can say for myself.
    Hon Majority Leader, is there any other Paper to be laid Committee on Education. Are they ready?
    You are ready?
    Very well.
    Mr Bagbin 12:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, so, we would take item number 4 (c).
    PAPERS 12:55 p.m.

    Mr Speaker 12:55 p.m.
    Hon Members, Paper duly laid: it is for distribution.
    Mr Bagbin 12:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your permission, we could take item number 4 (e) (ii).
    Mr Speaker 12:55 p.m.
    Hon Members, on the
    original Order Paper, item 4 (e) (ii) at page 2.
    By the Chairman of the Committee
    Report of the Special Budget Committee on the Annual Budget Estimates of the Commission on
    Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ) for the year ending, 31st December, 2015.
    Mr Speaker 12:55 p.m.
    Hon Members, Paper duly laid; it is for distribution.
    Mr Bagbin 12:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we can now move to Motions.
    Mr Bagbin 12:55 p.m.
    If we may take Motion numbered 7, that is on page 4 of the Order Paper. It is the Judicial Service.
    Mr Speaker 12:55 p.m.
    Hon Members, item number 7 on the original Order Paper at page 4.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 1:05 a.m.

    Majority Leader (Mr Alban S. K. Bagbin) 1:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢199,576,867 for the services of the Judicial Service for the year ending 31st December, 2015.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to reserve
    my right under Standing Order 86 (4) (c), in case there is the need for me to reply. I would want to exercise that right. Apart from that, I beg to move and the Chairman of the Judiciary Committee would present the Report, in seconding the Motion.
    Mr Speaker 1:05 a.m.
    Very well.
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Charles Obeng- Inkoom) 1:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion moved by the Hon Majority Leader, that this Honourable House approves the sum of
    GH¢199,576,867 for the services of the Judicial Service for the year ending, 31st December, 2015.
    Mr Speaker, in so doing, I present your Committee's Report.
    Introduction
    The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the 2015 Financial Year was presented to Parliament by the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth E. Terkper on Wednesday, 19th November, 2014 in accordance with article 179 (1) and (2) of the 1992 Constitution.
    Pursuant to article 179(2) and (4) of the Constitution, the 2015 Budget Estimates of the Judicial Service was laid in Parliament and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary for consideration and report in accordance with the Standing Orders of the House.
    Deliberations
    The Committee during the consideration of the Budget Estimates was assisted by the Judicial Secretary, Justice A. B. Poku- Acheampong and other officials from the Judicial Service. Also in attendance was the schedule officer from the Ministry of Finance.
    Reference documents
    The Committee referred to the following documents during its discussions:
    i. The 1992 Constitution
    ii. T h e S t a n d i n g O r d e r s o f Parliament
    iii. The Annual Budget Estimates of the Judicial Service for the 2014 financial year
    iv. The Budget Statement and E c o n o m i c P o l i c y o f t h e Government for the 2014 financial year
    Mission through the following objectives 1:05 a.m.
    i. Promoting the rule of law, transparency, efficiency and speedy administration of justice.
    ii. Promoting and upholding the fundamental Human rights and freedoms of all persons in the country.
    iii. Improving access to justice especially to the vulnerable and the excluded.
    iv. Improving human and institu- t ional capacity especial ly towards the protection of the vulnerable and the excluded.
    v. Ensuring efficient and speedy delivery of justice.
    vi. Improving the public image and confidence in the Service.
    vii. R e m o v i n g t h e
    perception of corruption in the Service.
    Analyses of the approved budget of the Judicial Service for 2014
    A total amount of one hundred and ninety-two million, one hundred and ninety-seven thousand, nine hundred and eighty-three Ghana cedis, sixty-six pesewas (GH¢192,197,983.66) was approved for the Judicial Service for the 2014 fiscal year. The breakdown is indicated in Table 1:
    SPACE FOR TABLE 1:05 a.m.

    Mr Frank B. Agyen (NPP - Effiduase/Asokore) 1:05 a.m.
    Thank you very much, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to contribute to this Motion.
    I rise therefore, to urge the august House to approve the figure mentioned-- GH¢199,576,867 to the Judicial Service.
    However, the Judiciary, being a very important organ of Government, is in such a position that investors and people who want to do business with Ghana to assist in promoting the growth of democracy and whatnot; look at the effectiveness of the Judiciary, the power it exhibits in order to be sure that in case of dispute, they can rely on the Judiciary for judicious delivery of justice.
    Article 127 of the Constitution makes it mandatory without option and without discretion for the Ministry of Finance to quarterly release moneys allocated to the Judiciary.
    Mr Speaker, as of now, per the 2014 Budget Statement, only 55.12 per cent of the amount given to Judiciary was released. In fact, Mr Speaker, they were released in such a manner that it became too difficult for the Judiciary to function. The quarterly release, which is the mandate given the Ministry to do, was never adhered to. The Ministry of Finance flouted the Constitution with careless abandon.
    Mr Speaker, page 2 of the Report
    indicates the mission of the Judiciary. The mission, among other things, is for promoting of rule of law, transparency, efficiency and speedy administration of justice, ensuring efficient and speedy delivery of justice, improving the public image and confidence in the service and removing the perception of corruption in the service.
    For these ideals to be adhered to, and for the Judiciary to be able to stand firm on its mission and deliver justice, money is of essence. Therefore, any allocation of money given to the Judiciary must not be toyed with.
    Mr Speaker, this year, an amount of GH¢253,000,000 plus was estimated for the Judiciary and before this comes into
    the books of the Judiciary, the Judiciary involved the Ministry of Finance through the backdoor to deliberate, sort out, disagree and agree before the figure comes out. When the figure comes out, it is only for the President to look at it and give it to Parliament to approve without recommending any reduction.
    Why do I say so? The Minister for Finance or the Ministry of Finance does the fiscal work for the presidency. If the Ministry takes part in any action that has to do with monetary allocation to the Judiciary and sends it to the presidency and the President comes back to reduce it or to recommend a reduction, what does it mean? It means giving with the right hand and taking it back with the left hand. And who is to blame? I think the Ministry of Finance is not able or has not been able to give of its best during deliberations with the Judicial Service to end at an amount that would not compel the presidency to recommend a reduction.
    The Ministry of Finance must sit up and stop toying or dealing as it likes with the Judiciary.
    Mr Speaker, several times, there have been requests to increase the internally generated funds (IGFs) allocation to the Judiciary, which has been pegged at 15 per cent since time immemorial and this Committee has advised several times for its upgrading to at least; 30 per cent, if not 50 per cent. We always come and it is at the same pole, with the excuse that the Hon Minister says he is rationalising together with other departments before it can improve upon the allocation of IGFs to the Judicial Service. If the IGFs is increased, a lot of money would go into the coffers of the Judicial Service and the budget discrepancies and problems facing the Judiciary would be reduced to a minimum.
    Mr Speaker, if you visit the Chambers
    of Appeal or Supreme Court Judges, you would be shocked to see that water does not run in the washrooms and this is so serious. If you go down to talk to the junior staff, medical bills have not been paid for over a year, which is so serious. If this is done to members of the Judiciary, why would people not have the perception of corruption?
    This is because they see them moving about comfortably, and so, people perceive that for all these difficulties to persist and for the people to walk chest out and perform their duties without let or hindrance, there is apparent corruption. Who caused this? The cause is that the Minister for Finance has neglected and refused to live up to expectation to help the Judiciary to function very well. The Judicial Service has a council composed of about 14 people. By implication, the presidency has -
    Mr Speaker 1:15 a.m.
    Hon Member, kindly wind up.
    Mr Agyen 1:15 a.m.
    By implication, it appears the presidency has about nine members out of the fourteen, a good majority. Now, when promotions or appointments are to be made for the superior courts, when the Council decides, the presidency has to decide who should be appointed. This cuts across all Governments that have come under this Constitution; it is wrong. I urge the Constitution Review Commission to have a critical look at that, so that the presidency would have no hand in deciding who sits as a Superior Court Judge.
    Therein lies the ability of the State to maintain a unique, independent judicial system whereby investors and others would sit up and say, “Go to Ghana, you will have justice without let or hindrance, go to Ghana and you would have Justices sitting without looking over their shoulders to see whether Big Brother is watching, go to Ghana and you would have Justices who would sit up and deliver
    Mr Speaker 1:15 a.m.
    Hon Minority Leader, please, reply and let me put the Question I want you to address this issue that has been raised. The process of the approval of the Audit Service Budget Estimates for Parliament and the Judiciary is different. They sent it to the presidency; the President writes to me, I refer it, and it is laid here with recommendation as required by the law. Why should the Ministry of Finance put whatever figure they have in the budget? In fact, when he laid his documents that day, it was a different document and so, why should the Ministry of Finance -- because of that recom-mendation, unless it is accepted by the House, remains a recommendation.
    Why should the Ministry of Finance put the figure in the budget? That is one of the points that have been raised on the floor and I think that is wrong. They should leave it blank, let them and keep their figure to themselves until the House decides on whether to accept the recommendation of His Excellency the President.
    Hon Minority Leader, are you ready to reply or should I take one or two? I have seen two people on their feet.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 1:15 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe you are addressing the person who for the time being is the Hon Majority Leader.
    Mr Speaker 1:15 a.m.
    Yes. [Pause.] I said Hon Majority Leader.
    When he moved the Motion, he referred to Standing Order 86 (4) with the right of reply. Or did I say “Hon Minority Leader”? It was a slip of tongue. [Laughter.] We all make mistakes.
    Mr Bagbin 1:15 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I totally agree that the position articulated by you is in accord with the law. The Ministry of Finance has no hand in determining the final estimates or provisions for the Judiciary. The recommendation from His Excellency the President is for us to decide and we can decide by accepting the recommendation or by rejecting it.
    The recommendation of the Committee is for us to accept that from His Excellency the President and I think that is what we do.
    The Budget Statement, which is what the Minister for Finance presented, gave an indication of the position of the Ministry of Finance but that has no influence on our deliberations here. It is that of the President which was considered and that is what the Committee has recommended for us to accept and I think we should do exactly that.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Deputy Ranking Member of the Committee talked about behind the scenes discussions that the Judiciary had been undertaking with the Ministry of Finance. That is definitely not known by our law. So, it may be hard to produce evidence in that direction. What is known is that they should submit their estimates to His Excellency the President two months to the end of the financial year and His Excellency the President would make a recommendation and submit it to the House, where we would look at their
    provisions and the recommendation of His Excellency the President and decide which one to take.
    So, the decision is for this House and not for any person. I think the right thing has been done and we have definitely noted the concerns of the Committee. At the right time, we would get them addressed because the Judiciary needs to be resourced and strengthened for us to have what we call democracy. Democracy is the rule of the law and so, if the organ to interpret and assist in the enforcement of the law is weak, we would definitely be having the rule of man. You would recall that I stated on the floor here that there are so many people in Ghana who are above the law, which is not good. So, we keep on saying nobody is above the law but in implementation, we see that there are so many people above the law. That is undemocratic and that is not what we opted for.
    Mr Speaker, I understand the situation and believe that with time, we would get over all these problems.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 1:15 a.m.
    Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved:
    That this Honourable approves the sum of GH¢199,576,867 for the services of the Judicial Service for the year ending 31st December,
    2015.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 1:15 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your permission, we may now move to item 10 on the Order Paper at page 5.
    Mr Speaker 1:25 p.m.
    Hon Member, item 10 Hon Minister for Youth and Sports?

    ANNUAL ESTIMATES, 2015

    Ministry of Youth and Sports
    Minister for Youth and Sports (Mr Mahama Ayariga ) (MP) 1:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢36,186,217 for the services of the Ministry of Youth and Sports for the year ending 31st December
    2015.
    Mr Speaker, the breakdown of the amount is as follows 1:25 p.m.
    (i) Government of Ghana -- GH¢35,906,401
    (ii)Internally Generated Funds -- GH˘279,816
    Total -- GH¢36,186,217
    Mr Speaker, there are three main agencies under the Ministry and this is to cover their expenses. They are the National Youth Authority, The National Sports Authority and The National Sports College and the Ministry itself.
    Mr Speaker, this year 2014, the Ministry was allocated a total amount of GH¢36,134,116.00 for its activities, programmes and projects.
    Mr Speaker, it worked on a number of projects; some of them were mainly legis la t ion for the Ghana Youth Employment and Entrepreneurial Development Agency (GYEEDA), which is currently before this House. And there has been some ongoing work on the new National Youth Bill and then the National Youth Policy and an Action Plan which has been approved by Cabinet and also a Bill for the National Sports College.
    Mr Speaker, the breakdown of the amount is as follows 1:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we also sponsored various national teams and associations to participate in tournaments. This year, we participated in the 2014 FIFA World Cup tournament in Brazil, the FIFA Under 17 Women's World Cup tournament in Costa Rica, the Under-20 World Cup tournament in Canada and 2014 CHAN tournament in South Africa early in January.
    Mr Speaker, we also took part in African Youth Olympics in Botswana, the World Youth Olympic in China and the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.
    There is ongoing work to develop infrastructure for the sporting sector. The construction of the Cape Coast Stadium is progressing steadily and all indications are that it would be completed in 2015.
    Mr Speaker, the National Youth Authority is also engaged in a number of programmes for the development of the youth as well as a number of activities including the Presidential Youth Dialogue that took place and the operations of the vocational and skills programmes of the National Youth Authority.
    Mr Speaker, also in the area of infrastructure development, the Ministry has signed a Memorandum of Under- standing with DDY Wing of Canada to rehabilitate and reposition the 11 Youth Leadership and Skill Training Institutes to make them more focused and efficient.
    Mr Speaker, in 2015, we propose to use the amount budgeted for us to continue with the work on the various legislations that we intend to bring before this House and also for the implementation of the Action Plan for the National Youth Policy. We would also continue to sponsor participation in various tournaments.
    Mr Speaker, early in January, 2015 we
    would be participating in the African Cup of Nations in Equatorial Guinea; the Black Satellites would also participate in Africa Under 20 Youth Championship in Senegal.
    We would also be participating in a number of qualifiers for tournaments in Africa and the World Cup qualifiers and participation in various competitions would be sponsored. The National Unity Games, the African Games in Congo Brazzaville, the Olympic and Para Olympic qualifiers, the ECOWAS Games in la Cote d' Ivoire and several other activities would be sponsored.
    The Ministry would also establish sports academies in the various regions and we aslo have plans to rehabilitate the existing stadia to bring them up to standard.
    Mr Speaker, we have put in a bid for the 2017 African Cup of Nations and so, we will continue to work on our bid.
    Mr Speaker, the National Youth Authority would also continue to implement the programmes that I have outlined above.
    Mr Speaker, even though the amount to the Ministry of Youth and Sports is not adequate to ensure the successful execution of all these projects and programmes, I move that this august House approves the sum of GH¢36,186,217.00 allocated to it by the Ministry of Finance for its activities for the 2015 financial year.
    Question proposed. Chairman of the Committee (Mr
    Kobena Mensah Woyome): Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion and in so doing, I present your Committee's Report.
    Introduction
    In accordance with article 179 of the

    Pursuant to Order 140 (4) and 187 of the Standing Orders of the House, the Hon Speaker referred the annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Youth and Sports to the Committee on Youth, Sports and Culture for consideration and report.

    Subsequently, the Committee met with the Hon Minister for Youth and Sports, Mr Mahama Ayariga, his deputy, Mr Vincent Opong-Asamoah and officials of the Ministry of Youth and Sports on the 8th and 9th of December, 2014 and considered the referral.

    The Committee is grateful to the Hon Minister and his team for their co- operation.

    Reference documents

    The Committee made reference to the underlisted documents during its deliberations:

    i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana

    ii. The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana

    iii. The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Govern- ment of Ghana for the 2015 financial year.

    iv. The 2014 Annual Budget Estimates of the Ministry of Youth and Sports.

    Mission Statement

    The Ministry of Youth and Sports is responsible for the formulation, implementation, co-ordination as well as monitoring and evaluation of youth and sports policies in the country.

    Implementing Agencies

    The underlisted agencies and Institution are responsible for the implementation of the policies and programmes of the Ministry.

    Policy Objectives

    The broad policy objectives of the Ministry are to:

    i. strengthen national capacity for sports management;

    ii. support the development of lesser known sports;

    iii. provide adequate and disability friendly infrastructure for sports in communities and schools;

    iv. ensure the provision of adequate training and skills development in line with global trends;

    v. ensure adequate capacity and skills development of the youth with disability; and

    vi. ensure integration of youth concerns into national develop- ment planning, processes and programmes.

    Performance for year 2014
    Mr Speaker, the breakdown of the amount is as follows 1:25 p.m.


    Space for Table 1 - PAGE

    7 - 1.25P.M.

    The Ministry Youth and Sports was allocated a total amount of thirty-six million, one hundred and thirty-four thousand, one hundred and sixteen Ghana cedis (GH¢36,134,116.00) comprising GH¢35,685,666.00 as GoG component and GH¢448,450.00 as IGFs for its programmes and activities for the 2014 financial year.

    However, as at October 2014, actual expenditure stood at GH¢44,149,794.78. While the Ministry was allocated an amount of GH¢19,879,851.00 for Goods and Services, it ended up with an expenditure of GH¢35,128,970.37. The Ministry attributed the over expenditure of GH¢15,249,119.37 to the following activities:

    i. Black Stars participation in the 2014 FIFA World Cup tourna- ment in Brazil.

    ii. Black Princesses participation in the FIFA Under-20 Women's World Cup in Canada.

    iii. Black Maidens participation in the FIFA Under-17 World Cup tournament in Costa Rica.

    iv. Ghana's participation in the Commonwealth Games in Glosgow.

    v. Ghana's participation in the World Youth Olympics in Botswana.

    vi. Ghana's participation in the World Youth Olympics in

    Nanjiing, China

    The Committee noted that out of an amount of GH¢6,366,328.00 provided for Asset, only GH¢616,857.28 representing 9.7 per cent was released. Generally, the non release of funds for Assets affected the execution of key projects of the Ministry.

    Activities undertaken in year 2014

    For yea r 2014 , t he Min i s t ry accomplished the following among others:

    i. Signed a Memorandum of Understanding with DDY Wing of Canada to provide technical and financial support for the rehabilitation of the 11 Youth Leadership and Skill Training Institutes under the National Youth Authority.

    ii. Facilitated the participation of various National Teams and Associations in both local and international competitions

    iii. Finalised and submitted for Cabinet's approved, the Action Plan for the National Youth policy.

    iv. Finalised and submitted for Cabinet's approved and onward submission to Parliament, the Youth Employment Agency Bill,

    2014.

    v. Completed and submitted to the Presidency, concept papers and drawings for the proposed District Youth and Sport Centres in selected districts.

    vi. Comple ted drawings and technical details for the proposed Sports Senior high Schools in the 10 regional capitals in the

    country.

    vii. Continued the construction of the super-structure of the Cape Coast Sport Stadium.

    viii. Collaborated with the private sector to convert the National Sport College into a Centre of Excellence in Sports in West Africa through a Public Private Partnership (PPP) arrangement.

    Budgetary allocation for year 2015
    Mr Speaker, the breakdown of the amount is as follows 1:25 p.m.
    ceilings for the Ministry, should take into account Ghana's participation in such important tournaments and make the appropriate budgetary provision.
    The Ministry has been allocated an amount of GH¢2,000,000.00 for Assets. The Committee observed that several construction and rehabilitation works will be undertaken by the Ministry in year 2015. The Ministry has put in a bid to host and organise the African Cup of Nations (AFCON) in 2017, and in anticipation of winning the bid, it will commence works on the rehabilitation of the Accra, Baba Yara, Essipong and Tamale sports stadia, which are expected to serve as match venues. Preparatory works on two new modern sports stadia will commence in Ho and Bolgatanga next year. Work on the Cape Coast Sports Stadium is also expected to be completed in October 2015 and could also serve as an alternative match venue for AFCON 2017.
    Considering the numerous projects to be undertaken in the year 2015, the Ministry indicated that the allocation for Assets is inadequate. Consequently, key
    projects such as the construction of the Cape Coast and Ho Sports Stadia, which require counterpart funding may face serious funding challenges.
    It came to the attention of the Committee that the Ministry is seriously constrained by office space. Currently, it is located within the premises of the Ministry of the Interior and the state of its building calls for urgent rehabilitation. The Ministry also lacks vehicles to carry out constant monitoring of the activities of its agencies, which are decentralised in nature.
    It is therefore imperative that the Ministry is adequately resourced to rehabilitate its office building and purchase vehicles to enable it play its oversight role effectively.
    National Sports College (NSC)
    For the effective implementation of its activities for the year 2015, the College budgeted for an amount of GH¢5,000,000.00 but was allocated GH¢2,141,346.00, representing 42.8 per cent of its budgetary requirement.
    The College will apply its resources to undertake programmes and activities including the following:
    i. Establish two academies in the Central and Northern Regions.
    ii. Collaborate with local and international experts to organise seminars, technical and administrative courses for prospective coaches, admini-strators, paramedics and journalists.
    iii. Participate in international training tournaments.
    Due to funding constraints, facilities at the College have deteriorated over the years, and have become unattractive to the various national teams and other private sports groups. This development has affected the College's ability to generate funds internally to support is programmes.
    The Committee was happy to note that in year 2015, the College, through a Public Private Partnership arrangement, will rehabilitate its existing infrastructure and upgrade the facilities at the College by constructing a multi-purpose sports complex and offices. The upgrade of the facilities will transform the National Sports College into a Centre of Excellence in Sports in the West African subregion.
    Given the above initiative, the Committee is optimistic that the College would be well positioned to attract private sports groups such as the Ghana Football Association (GFA) clubs and most importantly, make its facilities available to all national sports contingents. This will go a long way to reduce the huge expenditure on Government in accommodating the various national teams in hotels and also enable the College generate enough funds internally to maintain its facilities.
    The Committee observed that the College will establish two academies in the Central and Northern Regions to unearth new talents and offer them regular academic education and sports training.
    The College, however, expressed concern that the GFA in the selection of players into the junior national teams do not pay much attention to the Academy. The Committee is of the opinion that considering the balanced training offered by the College, its graduates are more likely to possess the requisite skills and discipline for the profession. The
    Committee therefore urges the GFA to pay more attention to players/products of the College in the selection of players.
    The issue of inadequate qualified staff continues to be of great concern to the College. The College indicated that on several occasions, it had to engage experts from the universities as facilitators/ instructors for some of its programmes. The Committee observed that by this arrangement, the College stands the risks of losing its customers to its competitors. It is therefore necessary that the College is adequately resourced to attract the needed qualified staff.
    National Youth Authority
    The National Youth Authority was allocated an amount of GH¢10,183,734.00 to implement its programmes in year 2014. Out of this amount, GH¢4,283,734, GH¢4,200,000.00 and GH˘1,700,000.00 were provided for compensation, Goods and Services and Assets respectively.
    The Committee was informed that as at October 2014, only GH¢690,000.00 had been released for Goods and Services while no release had been made for Assets. The Authority indicated that the irregular/ non-release of funds affected the smooth organisation of statutory programmes such as the International Youth Day and the African Youth Day as they were either held late or poorly organised, thus affecting their intended purpose.
    The Authority generally seeks to empower deprived and unskilled youth with leadership and vocational skills training in carpentry, masonry, dress- making, catering, plumbing, electrical and general agriculture at the 11 Youth, Leadership and Skills Training Institutes nationwide to make them employable.
    For year 2015, the Authority has been allocated GH¢10,053,734.00 to undertake a number of programmes including the following:

    i. Provide vocational/technical skills training for 1,430 deprived and out of school youth.

    ii. Sensitize 1,000,000 youth on the National Youth Policy.

    iii. Educate the youth on peer and reproduc t ive hea l th , the prevention of sexually t ransmi t t ed d i seases and infections including HIV/AIDs and other social issues.

    iv. Organise the International Youth Day and the African Youth Day.

    The Committee observed that the Authority plans to use its Asset allocation of GH¢1,300,000.00 to carry out the following:

    i. Complete and furnish the Nat ional Youth Resource Centre multipurpose building at the National Headquarters at Kaneshie.

    ii. Rehabilitate the Volta Regional Secretariat Office.

    iii. Refurbish and equip the Youth Response Centre at Sekondi.

    iv. Construct two workshops and two dormitories at the Nzema Manle and Ajumako Youth Leadership and Skills Training Institutes.

    Currently, the Authority faces some challenges in the area of office and residential accommodation for its staff in the regional and district secretariats. Its offices across the country also lack office equipment and furniture for effective youth service delivery.

    The Committee however noted that no release was made out of an allocation of GH¢1,700,000.00 for Assets for year 2014. In order not to compound the already difficult financial situation of the Authority, it is important that the Ministry of Finance ensures that releases for year 2015 are made fully and on time to the Authority.

    The Authority is also confronted with the challenge of inadequate infrastruc- tural facilities, as well as basic tools and equipment at the various Youth Leadership and Skills Training Institutes. This situation affects the Authority's ability to provide training for the increasing number of targeted benefi-ciaries of its programme.

    The Committee was happy to note that a Memorandum of Understanding has been signed with the DDY Wing of Canada to provide technical and financial support for the rehabilitation and upgrading of facilities at the 11 Youth Leadership and Skills Training Centres nationwide. The completion of this project will meet the short and long term needs of the youth in the country.

    National Sports Authority (NSA)

    The Committee was informed that the National Sports Authority in year 2015 will among others:

    i. Prepare and organise national unity games.

    ii. Prepare and participate in All African Games in Congo Brazzaville.

    iii. Prepare and participate in Olympic and Paralympic Games qualifiers.

    iv. Prepare and participate in

    ECOWAS games.

    v. Support various National Sports Associations to compete in international and continental events.

    For the execution of the above and other activities, the Authority has been provided a total sum of GH¢11,591,342.00 made up of GH˘11,311,526.00 GoG component and GH¢279,816.00 IGF.

    The Authority indicated that it presented a budget of GH˘26,140,150.00 for Goods and Services to the Ministry of Finance but was allocated GH¢5,316,818.00 representing only 20.3 per cent of the total requirement. To ensure the successful organisation of the programmes of the Authority, the Ministry of Finance is requested to provide the needed resources to the Authority.

    For Assets, the Authority presented a budget of GH¢25,000,000.00 but was allocated GH¢1,500,000.00 representing 6 per cent of its budget requirement. The Authority lacks state-of-art facilities, equipment and kits for training to enhance performance and achieve excellent results. To ensure the provision of such facilities, the Committee recommends that the Ministry of Finance should make additional resources available to the Authority.

    The issue of inadequate administrative and technical personnel especially coaches remains a challenge to the Authority. The Authority indicated that it has been unable to secure financial clearance from the Ministry of Finance to enable it engage more administrative and technical staff. The Committee urges the Ministry of Finance to give clearance to the Authority to engage the needed personnel

    to provide the relevant support for sports development.

    It came to the attention of the Committee that the Authority is saddled with several court cases arising from the non-payment of services rendered to it. The Committee was informed by the Ministry that it has brought to the attention of the Ministry of Finance all court cases for quick settlement. The Committee recommends that the Ministry of Finance should as a matter of urgency settle the debts of the Authority to avoid further embarrassment.

    Conclusion

    The Ministry of Youth and Sports plays a crucial role in fostering peace, national integration and promoting macro- economic stability, and good health.

    While the Youth sector empowers the youth through the delivery of leadership and skills training to make them responsive to the labour market, the Sports sector unearths talents to participate in local and international sports events to win laurels for the country as well as foster international co-operation, friendship and solidarity.

    To this end, it is important to continue to ensure the sustainable development of these two sub-sectors by resourcing them adequately.

    The Committee hereby recommends for the approval of the House, an amount of thirty-six million, one hundred and eighty- six thousand, two hundred and seventeen Ghana cedis (GH¢36,186,217.00) for the implementation of the programmes and activities of the Ministry of Youth and Sports for the fiscal year ending 2015.

    Respectfully submitted.
    Mr Isaac K. Asiamah (NPP -- Atwima-Mponua) 1:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to
    Mr Isaac K. Asiamah (NPP -- Atwima-Mponua) 1:25 p.m.


    contribute to the Motion numbered 10 on the Order Paper. In so doing, permit me to go through some aspects of the Report of the Committee.

    Mr Speaker, if you look at the Report on page 3, we have the budget approved for this year. Of course, we have the actuals, as GH¢44,149,794.78. Clearly, Mr Speaker, there is a budget overrun of

    GH¢8,000,000.

    Mr Speaker, this came about as a result of our participation in the 2014 World Cup. That is why before we went to the World Cup, this Committee insisted that the Ministry produced a World Cup budget, but they did not do so and that is why we have this overrun.

    Mr Speaker, we need to be serious with the way we programme and plan our things. This is a Ministry that has consistently been failing to produce budgets for our national teams.

    Mr Speaker, as we speak now, we will be going to Equatorial Guinea just next month. The Committee sat, met the Hon Minister but he could not give us any budget for our participation in Equatorial Guinea. These are matters that this House needs to take serious.
    Mr Speaker 1:25 p.m.
    Hon Minister, point of order?
    Mr Ayariga 1:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, on the
    issue of budget, as we speak, we are still working with GFA on their budget. So when we conclude, we will also let the Committee members know. It is not as if they have requested and we have
    refused to give them a budget. We have not concluded the budget yet.
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 1:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he has even worsened the case. We are going for a tournament next month. On 17th January, 2015, we are beginning the tournament and the Hon Minister does not have a budget for our participation. That is serious. Are we planning in the country at all, that we have less than one month to a tournament and the Hon Minister is telling us that he does not even have the budget for our participation? That is serious.
    Mr Speaker, that is the more reason sometimes we do things in a rush manner and we go and embarrass the whole country. We went to Brazil, look at what happened there? The mess - those ad hoc measures do not help Ghana at all.
    Mr Speaker, what happened in Brazil, we as a Committee foresaw it. We forewarned the Ministry. Around this time last year, we spoke about this issue, that we needed the budget for Brazil. We asked the Ministry several times but they could not provide the budget for Brazil. We went out there and look at what happened.
    Mr Speaker, whenever the Committee gets the opportunity, we are able to help scrutinise them well, so that Ghana will gain a lot. The situation whereby the Committee does not have access to the budget, Mr Speaker, is something that this House needs to take action on. It does not help anybody.
    Mr Speaker, as the Hon Minister said,
    there is an overrun there and this is even not the figure that should have come. Per my own calculations, more was spent in Brazil far more than the figure that has been provided here.
    Mr Speaker, Cape Coast Sports
    Stadium has been hanging. As we speak, the Committee has not been briefed on the progress of work. Mr Speaker, we are told that there is a grant amount that is being used to sponsor that project.
    As we speak, where that money is coming from, the Ministry has not briefed the Committee. So, it is something that we need answers from the Ministry.
    I hope that, when winding up, the Hon Minister will provide answers on the Cape Coast Sports Stadium, where it has reached and of course, where the grant component of the amount is coming from.
    Mr Speaker, when you go through the Report, at page 4, it says 1:35 p.m.
    “Finalised and submitted for Cabinet's approval and onward submission to Parliament, the Youth Employment Agency Bill, 2014”.
    We are told that it was prepared by the Ministry of Youth and Sports and as it has been indicated here, for onward transmission to Parliament, but the Youth Employment Agency Bill, 2014 before this Parliament was brought by the Ministry for Employment and Labour Relations.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to ask the Hon Minister which Ministry is going to handle this programme. The Hon Minister himself was a bit confused whether it is still before the Ministry of Youth and Sports or it has been shifted to another Ministry. We need clarity on that.
    The Hon Minister is here; he should speak to that. Which Ministry is going to handle the National Youth Employment Programme; he could not provide any answer. He is here; if he is bold enough, he should speak to it - [Interruption] I hope this one, he is going to get up and speak to it. Mr Speaker, there is confusion over which Ministry is going to handle - [Interruption] There is total confusion over which Ministry -
    Mr Speaker 1:35 p.m.
    Hon Ranking Member,
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 1:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I read from the Report here.
    Mr Speaker 1:35 p.m.
    Which page?
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 1:35 p.m.
    Page 4 of the Report. Mr Speaker, it is there.
    The issue is, there is a Ministry that is reporting on a programme and the Hon Minister said that they prepared and submitted it for Cabinet approval -- the Youth Employment Agency Bill, 2014.
    rose
    Mr Speaker 1:35 p.m.
    Hon Minister?
    Mr Ayariga 1:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we were given a budget to carry out a number of activities. One of them was to resolve the legal framework for the operation of GYEEDA. We did do the work of drafting a Bill, holding stakeholder consultations and so, we spent the money for that.
    Then we submitted a draft to Cabinet. At that point, there were other Executive decisions that resulted in another sector Minister bringing it to Cabinet. So, in accounting for last year's spending, we need to indicate how much work we did on the Bill to the fact that another Ministry is bringing the Bill to Parliament. That is a
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 1:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister was before the Committee; we asked a question and that is why I am reporting it here. We asked him and he could not provide any answer. So, for some of us, we believe that there is still confusion over which Ministry is going to handle the programme.
    Mr Speaker, we need to insist that the Ministry should have the budgets of all the sporting disciplines, so that they prepare and come to meet the Committee next time round.
    Mr Speaker, this ad hoc way of getting money from Government to sponsor national teams and national sporting disciplines does not help this country. Rather we need to prepare, so that whenever they meet us, we can speak to the figures.
    Mr Speaker, if you go through the national teams, we have about 36 sporting disciplines in this country, including football. But when you ask the Ministry of a line-up of their budgets, they will say they cannot provide.
    In my opinion, that is not good for
    planning. They are there, their programmes are there - And most of these bodies, as you know, are internationally affiliated. So, we need to have their budgets beforehand, so that Ghana can plan well. That is something that we have observed as a Committee. Over the years, we do not seem to be serious the way we plan with our national sporting disciplines.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 1:35 p.m.
    Hon Minister, kindly wind up. I want to put the Question.
    Mr Ayariga 1:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I do
    appreciate the concerns and issues raised. They will be taken on board as we
    implement next year's budget.
    On that note, I urge Hon Members -
    Mr Speaker 1:35 p.m.
    But try and meet the Committee on the issue of your preparation for Equatorial Guinea.
    Mr Ayariga 1:35 p.m.
    Very well. That will be discussed with the Committee members. In fact, it was promised.
    Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker 1:35 p.m.
    Very well.
    Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate.
    Question put and Motion agreed to. Resolved:
    That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢36,186,217 for the services of the Ministry of Youth and Sports for the year ending 31st December, 2015.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 1:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your
    kind permission, we would consider item number (9).
    Mr Speaker 1:35 p.m.
    Hon Members, item number (9) on the Order Paper, Motion - Hon Minister for Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts.
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 1:45 p.m.

    Minister for Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts (Mrs Elizabeth Ofosu- Agyare) 1:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the
    sum of GH¢33,296,543 for the services of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts for the year ending 31st December, 2015.
    Mr Speaker, the Ministry's mandate is to provide a firm, stable policy environment for effective mainstreaming of Ghanaian culture into all aspects of national life and to ensure the strong emergence of a vibrant creative economy to improve and advance the tourism industry.
    Mr Speaker, the Minis t ry, in collaboration with its 14 implementing agencies, carry out key programmes including management and administra- tion, tourism product development, tourism research and marketing, tourism quality assurance, culture, creative arts, heritage development and management.
    Mr Speaker, the sector's budget allocation for the 2015 fiscal year is thirty- three million, two hundred and ninety-six thousand, five hundred and forty-three Ghana cedis (GH¢33,296,543), out of which GH¢24,727,359 is GoG, GH¢8,569,184 is internally generated funds (IGFs). This represents an increase of GH¢463,543 over the revised budgetary allocation for 2014 (GH¢32,832,578.10).
    The outlook for 2015 is good. Mr Speaker, the sector's budget allocation in 2015 will be used to continue to pursue its goal of developing Ghana as the preferred tourist destination in Africa and for tourism, culture and creative arts sectors to be a good revenue generator and employment creator by showcasing Ghana's tourism to travel trade practitioners, the media and investors at international fairs and exhibitions.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to take this opportunity to wish you all a Merry
    Christmas and a happy New Year.
    Thank you.
    Question proposed.
    Chairman of the Committee (Alhaji Amadu B. Sorogho) 1:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion ably moved by the Hon Minister responsible for Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢33,296,543.00 for the services of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts for the year ending 31st December, 2015.
    Mr Speaker, I present the Committee's Report.
    Creative Arts
    Introduction
    The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2015 financial year was presented to the House on Wednesday, 19th November, 2014 by the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Emmanuel Terkper.
    Mr Speaker referred the 2015 Annual Estimates of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts (MTCCA) to the joint Committees on Trade, Industry and Tourism and Youth, Sports and Culture for consideration and report in accordance with article 179 of the Constitution of Ghana and pursuant to the Orders 140(4) and Orders 159 and 187 of the Standing Orders of the House.
    In considering the annual estimates, the Committee met with the Hon Minister for Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts, Mrs Elizabeth Ofosu-Agyare, her technical team, the departments and agencies under the Ministry.
    Reference documents
    Chairman of the Committee (Alhaji Amadu B. Sorogho) 1:45 p.m.


    Tourism research and marketing

    Participation in International Tourism Fairs.

    Ghana's Participation in 56th UNWTO Commission for Africa Meeting, and Regional Seminar on Tourism and Air Transport Connectivity in Africa, Luanda, Angola.

    Participation in the Inaugural INDABA Ministerial Session, Durban, South Africa.

    7th Ministerial Conference of CODEPA Member Countries.

    Ghana participated in the 20th Edition of the International Publishing and Book Fair in Casablanca, 13-25 February, 2014.

    Grand Launch of Domestic Tourism.

    Organisation of Emancipation Day.

    Okwahu Hang and Paragliding Festival at Atibie, Kwahu- Eastern Region.

    Tourism quality assurance programme

    Inspections of tourism establish- ments

    The Ghana Tourism Authority inspected and licensed 3,213 tourism enterprises as follows:

    Accommodation =2,414

    Catering = 437 (18 night clubs inclusive)

    Travel Trade = 362

    Culture, Creative Arts and Heritage Management

    Preparation of Legal and Regulatory Framework for Creative Arts.

    Workshop on inventory of cultural goods.

    National Festival of Arts and Culture

    (NAFAC).

    Stakeholder engagements on the Cinematography Bill.

    GhanaEurope roundtable discus- sion on strategies for the sustainable

    management of the Forts and Castles of Ghana which constitutes monuments of shared heritage

    Ghana Museums and Monuments Board also collaborated with the Manchester University to exchange exhibition of heritage materials.

    Outlook for the Ministry

    Financial

    2015 Budget for the Ministry

    In 2015, the Ministry was allocated a total amount of thirty-three million, two hundred and ninety-six thousand, five hundred and forty-three Ghana cedis (GH¢33,296,543) for its operations. Table 2 gives details of expenditure to the various programmes with culture, creative arts and heritage development taking about 69 per cent of the total allocation.

    SPACE FOR Table

    2 - PAGE 8 - 1.45 P.M.

    Table 3 provides the allocation by economic classification. Compensation constitutes about 67 per cent of the total budgetary allocation. Table 4 shows budget allocation by cost centres.

    SPACE FOR Tables

    3 &4 - PAGE 9 - 1.45P.M.

    Non-Financial Management and Administration

    Establish a Creative Arts Unit at the Ministry and at the NCC to handle issues on its growth.

    Organise quarterly Public Private Partnership Forum Arts sector.

    Organise quarterly Ministerial Advisory Board Meeting.

    Payment of subscriptions.

    Participate in budget workshops preparat ion (MTEF/GIFMIS programmes).

    Train staff in tourism, culture and creative arts related skills.

    Sensitise stakeholders on UNESCO conventions.

    Implement the first phase of the National Tourism Development Plan (2013-2017).

    U n d e r t a k e m o n i t o r i n g a n d evaluation of policies, plans and programmes.

    Enforce laws and regulations pertaining to intellectual property rights.

    Tourism product development
    Chairman of the Committee (Alhaji Amadu B. Sorogho) 1:55 a.m.
    Organise annual Kiddafest and provide support for performing artistes.
    Research into new dance forms to promote Ghanaian culture.
    Museums interaction programme.
    Payment of subscription to Interna- tional organisations.
    Organise seminar on the use of Ghanaian Language as a potent tool for nation building.
    Organise seminars and exhibitions on Kwame Nkrumah's legacy
    Observations
    2014 Budget implementation challenges and constraints
    The Committee observed that the allocation of GH¢33,296,543 for the whole Ministry and its fourteen (14) agencies and subvented organisations put a major limitation on the implementation of mandatory programmes and activities to be realised by the Ministry. In addition, the realignment of the Ministry to take on additional eleven (11) cultural agencies and the already two existing tourism agencies (GTA and HOTCATT) was without corresponding realignment budget allocation. Non-release of funds with respect to Goods and Services and Assets
    It is worthy to note that the non release of funds with respect to Goods and Services and Assets to the Ministry, has among others, resulted in the following;
    Inability to honour international obligation-- non-payment of UNWTO annual subscription (two
    years arrears 2013 and 2014).
    Non implementation of critically planned programmes such as Public Private Partnership Fora, Ministerial Advisory Board meetings, et cetera.
    Worsening of logistics situation of the Ministry resulting in poor/old vehicles for supervision, monitoring and evaluation of progammes and projects.
    Basic office supplies notably stationary, toners and other logistics consistently in short supply.
    The Ministry losing her credit worthiness to suppliers.
    Ghana's non-participation in the Africa Magic Viewers' Choice Awards in Lagos, Nigeria.
    Ghana's non-participation in the 9th Annual Africa Presidential Forum on Tourism.
    Stakeholders meeting on tourism statistics could not be held.
    Official launch of the National Planning Committee for UNWTO Conference on Tourism Branding and Africa's Image could not come on.
    Internally Generated Funds
    It came to light that in developing MOTCCA's 2015 Budget, the Ministry has taken into consideration the need to build institutional capacity in order to increase internally generated funds (IGFs).
    Ghana Tourism Authority
    It was revealed that the target set for the
    Authority's internally generated funds was unrealistic given that the Authority has no vehicles to perform its role.
    Sector's contribution to national development
    The Committee was happy that the tourism industry maintained its position as the 4th highest foreign exchange earner by generating US$1.9 billion in 2013 and contributing 4.7 per cent to GDP. The Committee further noted that survey conducted by the Ministry on 891 culture/creative arts industries from twenty (20) selected districts in Ghana revealed that direct jobs created for 2013 were 45,000 and income generated was GH¢42 million.
    Update on the Tourism Levy
    The Committee lauded the performance of the 1 per cent Tourism Levy which has generated about seven million, eight hundred and fifty-one thousand, one hundred and fifty-seven Ghana cedis, sixty-nine pesewas (GH¢7,851,157.69).
    Recommendations
    Based on the above observations, the Committee would wish to make the following recommendations:
    The Ministry of Finance should take cognisance of the fact that the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts has taken on additional agencies and therefore should realign the budgetary allocation to correspond to the additional roles and responsibilities.
    The Ministry of Finance should ensure the timely release of funds for both Goods and Services and Assets of the Ministry of Tourism,
    Culture and Creative Arts to enable it perform its functions effectively. The release should reflect in the Ministry's accounts and not just by warrants.
    The Committee recommends to the Board that manages the Ghana Tourism Levy to put into good use the proceeds realised so far.
    The Committee recommends the release of funds for the purchase of vehicles for the Ghana Tourism Authority to enable it achieve its set target with respect to the internally generated funds.
    Conclusion
    The joint Committee on Trade, Industry and Tourism and Youth, Sports and Culture, having cautiously examined the 2015 Budget Estimates of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts, recommends to the House to approve the sum of thirty-three million, two hundred and ninety-six thousand, five hundred and forty-three Ghana cedis (GH¢33,296,543) being budgetary allocation to the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts (MTCCAs) to enable it carry out its programmes and activities for the 2015 fiscal year.
    Respectfully submitted.

    Daniel Nii Kwartei Titus Glover (NPP - Tema West): Mr Speaker, I also rise to support the Motion, for an amount of GH¢33,296,543, for the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts.

    Mr Speaker, it is on record that tourism plays a very important contribution in terms of revenue generation to our Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Unfortunately, we are paying lip service to this industry. We have so many tourist sites in this
    Mr Speaker 1:55 a.m.
    Hon Member, please, take your seat.
    Hon Members, having regard to the state of Business of the House, I direct that Sittings be held outside the prescribed period.
    Nii Kwartei TitusGlover: Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
    In The Gambia, the only resource they have is groundnuts, but they have added on tourism to make sure they rake in a lot of revenue to support their economy.
    Mr Speaker, as I go through the Report, in 2014, Assets had GH¢ 3,363,673, and this was reduced downwards to GH¢ 2,354,571.10. Mr Speaker, this action of the Ministry of Finance reminds me of the relationship between the driver and the car owner.
    The car owner always want to tell the driver every day; “make sure you come home with more sales.” Meanwhile, the driver keeps telling the car owner; “I have a lot of problems to fix on the car to enable me come home with good sales.”
    This is a typical example of the Ministry of Finance, where you have slashed their Assets; their Goods and Services have equally been slashed. Paradoxically, you are expecting them to make more revenue, and Mr Speaker, it does not add up!
    You have reduced their assets, you have
    reduced their Goods and Services, yet, Mr Speaker, under interanlly generated funds (IGFs), in 2014, they budgeted GH¢ 5,873,760, and it was revised upwards to GH¢ 7,155,577.00 and that is my worry and my difficulty.
    Mr Speaker, in doing so, there is a need for us to make sure that the High Commissions and the Embassies of our country are given targets.
    The Ministry must compel them, because it is out of these visits - the marketing of our country with our tourist attractions, can rake in more money for the State, and for that matter, the Ministry's need to give them targets.
    Mr Speaker, there is also the need for us to look at the relationship between the North and the South, when it comes to the slave trade routes, because this has not been coming, and I think that it is a major concern to look at the slave trade routes.
    The nonpayment or releases to the tourism Ministry, Mr Speaker, if I turn to page 11 of the Report, it is so disgraceful that the Ministry, for two years, that is 2013/2014 has not been able to pay their subscriptions, to where they are, affiliated to international bodies.
    You would be surprised that one day, we would attend a conference, and be asked to walk out of the conference room because we have not paid our subscriptions. Mr Speaker, that would be very shameful, but I pray that it never happens.
    Mr Speaker, it is also worrying that logistics, such as vehicles, simple office supplies like stationeries and toners are short in the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts. Mr Speaker, they are even losing their credit worthiness as a Ministry.
    If we want tourism to grow - we have made a lot of noise that Ghana is a showpiece, and we have so many beautiful attractions, yet what they are due, to enable them perform as a Ministry, has not been forthcoming. Hence Mr Speaker, it is worrying.
    As I conclude on the estimates for the Ministry, let us not go that path, when we
    are approving the 2015 Budget this year -- I believe that if we give serious attention to this Ministry, it can even take up cocoa revenue for our country.
    I am so grateful for the opportunity to contribute on the estimates for the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts.
    Mr Speaker 1:55 a.m.
    Hon Members, that brings us to the end of the debate.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved:
    That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢33,296,543 for the services of the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Creative Arts for the year ending 31st December
    2015.
    Mr Speaker 1:55 a.m.
    Yes, Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
    Hon Members, First Deputy Speaker to take the Chair.
    Mr Agbesi 1:55 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your kind permission, if we can take item number 11, for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration, at page 5.
    Mr Speaker 1:55 a.m.
    Hon Members, item number 11. Is that right?
    Mr Agbesi 1:55 a.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker, that is right -- item number 11.
    Mr Speaker 1:55 a.m.
    Hon Members, item 11 on the Order Paper, Motion.
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 2:05 a.m.

    Minister for Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration (Ms Hannah Serwaa Tetteh) 2:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢ 271,324,509 for the services of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration for the year ending 31st December, 2015.
    Mr Speaker, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration has, as its mandate, to advise the Government on the formulation of the foreign policy of Ghana, and implements that policy in the most efficient and cost-effective manner.
    The budget of the Ministry will go to support its headquarters; 57 Ghana Diplomatic Missions and Consular Posts abroad, and 3 subvented organisations; mainly, the Legon Centre for International Affairs and Diplomacy, (LECIAD), The National African Peer Review Mechanism - Governing Council (NAPRIM-GC), and the All Africa Students' Union.
    Mr Speaker, the budget allocated this year, is a significant improvement on the budget that was allocated last year, GH¢153,953,029.00, but Mr Speaker, the increase essentially takes into considera- tion the depreciation of the cedi, and the fact that most salaries and wages for the Ministry are Forex- based, and as a result of which we needed to take cognisance of that, in respect of item number 1.
    Mr Speaker, but I must also indicate that we have also had an increase in our allocation for goods and services, and also for Capex, which has been significantly increased from last year.
    In the course of this year, Mr Speaker, we undertook a number of activities that meant to promote regional integration within our sub region, especially during the time when President Mahama had taken over the chairmanship of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Authority of Heads of State and Government. We organised

    a 45th Session of ECOWAS this year, we had an extraordinary Session on the security situation in the subregion on the 30th of May, 2014, and we also had an extraordinary summit on EBOLA.

    We have also created the Diaspora Affairs Bureau, which essentially is to implement our intention to reach out more strategically to Ghanaians and Africans in the diaspora, and help to address the concerns of Ghanaians living abroad, and effectively integrate them into the national development effort.

    Mr Speaker, we were not able to implement our intention of extending passport application centres to other parts of the country, and also to have biometric passports processed in our missions abroad because of our budgetary constraints. But we have provided for this in the budget for 2015.

    I am pleased to say, Mr Speaker, that Cabinet has approved that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration retains a 100 per cent of its IGFs in order to take care of item two expenditures in respect of goods and services. We hope that the fact that we are able retain the IGFs generated in-forex and use it to cater for our goods and services expenditures, will significantly reduce the stress experienced by our Missions abroad.

    We also, in the course of this year - because we anticipate that we will be able to have the finance to do it, in turn for our ten largest missions to begin to process biometric passports in those missions where we have the largest Ghanaian diasporas, in order that we are able to meet the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) deadline for changing of passports.

    Mr Speaker, we also hope that in the

    course of the year, we would be able to complete renovation and construction of on-going projects of the Ministry. It is our intention to finish what was started before we think about any new expenditures.

    Mr Speaker, on that note, I will very much appreciate if the House would approve the sum of GH¢271,324,509.00 for the services of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration for the year ending 31st December, 2015.

    Question proposed.
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Emmanuel K. Bandua) 2:05 a.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion, and in so doing, present the Committee's Report.
    Introduction
    The Minister for Finance, Hon Seth Emmanuel Terkper presented to Parliament the 2015 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana on Wednesday, 19th November 2014 in accordance with article 179 of the Constitution and Order 140 (1) of the Standing Orders of the House.
    Subsequent to the presentation and pursuant to Order 140(4) of the Standing Orders of the House, the estimates of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration were referred to the Committee for consideration and report.
    The Committee met on Friday, 12th December, 2014 to consider the estimates and hereby reports as follows:
    Reference documents
    The Committee made reference to the following documents:
    (i) The 2014 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Govern-
    ment of Ghana
    (ii) The 2014 estimates of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration
    (iii) The Constitution of the Republic of Ghana
    (iv) The Standing Orders of the House
    Mission of the Ministry
    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration exists to advise the government on the formulation of the Foreign Policy of Ghana and implements its objectives in the most efficient and cost-effective manner --
    MR FIRST DEPUTY SPEAKER
    Mr Bandua 2:07 p.m.
    In pursuance of this Mission, the Ministry has set for itself a vision to establish “a well-resourced foreign Ministry capable of establishing, developing and sustaining international goodwill, solidarity and support for national development”.
    Agencies under the Ministry
    The Ministry relies on the under-listed Agencies in the pursuit of its mission
    The headquarters
    Fifty-seven (57) Ghana Diplomatic Missions and Consular Posts abroad.
    Three subvented organisations, namely:
    Legon Centre for International A f f a i r s a n d D i p l o m a c y
    (LECIAD)
    National African Peer Review
    Mechanism-Governing Council
    (NAPRM-GC)
    All Africa Students' Union
    (AASU)
    Pursuant to the mandate of the Ministry, these agencies have the responsibility of handling specific operational functions including formulating and executing Ghana's foreign policy in order to achieve the objectives therein; organising intensive monitoring of activities; undertaking sensitisation and dissemination exercises on the African Peer Review Mechanism; training Foreign Service Officers and other public servants in international affairs and diplomacy; and fostering co-operation among African Students and educational institutions.
    Overview of the performance of the Ministry in 2014
    The Ministry was allocated a total sum of one hundred and forty-one million, two hundred and seventeen thousand and five hundred and forty-nine Ghana cedis (GH¢ 141,217,549.00) for the effective performance of its mandate for the 2014 financial year.
    With this allocation, the Ministry was able to achieve the following, not- withstanding the challenges that it faced.
    2014 Achievements
    Permanent Joint Commissions
    The Ministry successfully organised three Permanent Joint Commissions for Co-operation (PJCC) meetings within the year.
    Establishment of ICT Unit
    T h e M i n i s t r y c o m p l e t e d t h e establishment of its ICT Unit with the introduction of a Draft ICT Policy
    Mr Bandua 2:07 p.m.


    document, including a training manual, to govern its operations.

    Renovation

    The Ministry's third phase of renovation at the Chancery of the New York Mission was completed.

    Establishment of New Diplomatic Mission

    The Committee was informed that the Ministry finalised the establishment of a new Diplomatic Mission at the Vatican with a Resident Head of Mission and other personnel currently at post there.

    Good Neighbourliness

    Cognisant of the need for the concerted efforts of all countries in the West African sub-region to address common challenges to development in the sub- region, including the growing menace of terrorism, trafficking in small arms and weapons, drugs and children across national frontiers, the Ministry continued to make the pursuit of peace and security in West Africa a high priority in the conduct of Ghana's foreign policy.

    The Ministry's attachment of great importance to the policy of good neighbourliness was aimed at promoting mutual trust and confidence among West African States, to facilitate the search for solutions to the common challenges of the sub-region.

    Regional Integration

    In much the same vein, the Ministry facilitated the successful organisation of three major ECOWAS Summits and Council of Ministers Meetings.

    These are the:

    i. 45th Ordinary Session of the ECOWAS Authority of Heads of State and Governments held in July 2014.

    ii. Extraordinary Session on the security situation in the sub- region, Accra on 30th May 2014

    iii. Extraordinary Summit on EBOLA, and Burkina Faso in Accra on 6th November 2014

    Developing and Sustaining International Goodwill and Solidarity

    In keeping with its objective of developing and sustaining international goodwill, solidarity and support for national development, the Ministry maintained a reasonably high diplomatic presence which yielded significant gains for the country in respect of foreign direct investment, international solidarity and a sustained positive image.

    The high points of this initiative included the exchange of high profile visits which exchanges culminated in the conclusion of bilateral arrangements. Also, in line with this objective, the Ministry signed ten important Memoranda of Understanding (MoUs) that brought great gains to Ghana.

    Diasporian Affairs Bureau

    The Committee was informed that the Ministry was successful in creating the Diasporian Affairs Bureau (DAB) to help address concerns of Ghanaians residing abroad and to effectively integrate them in the National Development efforts.

    Economic Diplomacy

    The Ministry intensified its collabo- ration with the other MDAs to promote the realisation of the national objective of diversifying and expanding the export base of the country, by further seeking foreign markets for Ghanaian products and also working to ensure that Ghana

    benefitted from preferential access to markets and other arrangements which were the direct benefits of bilateral and multilateral trade agreements.

    The Ministry again supported the diversification and expansion of the tourism industry for job creation and revenue generation by marketing Ghana abroad as a competitive tourist destination. This was done to also attract foreign direct investment into the hospitality industry.

    Multilateral diplomacy

    In much the same way, the Ministry coordinated Ghana's participation in the deliberations of a number of international organisations including the United Nations, the Commonwealth, the Non- Aligned Movement, the ATLOS, La Francophonie and the CEN-SAD on which Ghana is represented and thus coordinated the country's contribution in the global quest for solutions to the challenges that confront international peace, stability and development at the sub-regional, continental and global levels.

    In this light, the Ministry coordinated the participation of H.E. the President in the 69th Session of the UN Conference in September 2014.

    Welfare of Ghanaian citizens abroad

    The Committee was informed that the Ministry endeavoured to intensify its efforts in providing consular assistance to Ghanaians abroad and ensured that they lived in safety, freedom and in dignity.

    This, the Ministry did in giving practical meaning to Government's recognition of the significant contribution which Ghanaians living abroad make to the development process of the country.

    Challenges

    The afore-mentioned successes though resounding, the Ministry had its fair share of challenges which prevented it from making greater impact. Some of these are discussed below.

    Foreign Exchange Depreciation

    One major difficulty that the Ministry encountered in the 2014 financial year had to do with the depreciation of the cedi, relative to the major international currencies such as the United States dollar and the British pounds sterling for a significant part of the year. This was particularly disturbing, given the peculiar situation of the Ministry which has a bigger segments of its agencies outside the country.

    The Committee was informed that payment of wages and salaries was a problem as the approved ceiling significantly fell short of the amount required due to foreign exchange problems which affected the prevailing rates in the respective foreign currencies.

    The most affected expenditure items were the capital expenditure and Goods and Services. While no release had been made for Capital Expenditure throughout the year which affected performance in that area, only five months of Goods and Services had been released with further arrangements to release the allocation for a few additional months within the remaining part of the year.

    Insufficient budgetary allocation

    The exchange rate problems effectively affected all the other expenditure items and worsened the already low level funding that had been allocated to the Ministry for the year under consideration.

    Delays in release of funds

    Again, with the exchange rate problems, the rate of release of funds far outpaced the programmed releases per tranche. The implication was that, what had been
    Mr Bandua 2:07 p.m.


    programmed to be spreaded over the year had to be obtained in a few months, since more cedis were then needed to exchange for the specific amounts in foreign currencies to meet programmed expenditures.

    The Committee noted that such delays in releases often affected the very image of the country negatively as such, delays invariably resulted in delayed settlement of rents and related charges to local property owners and utility charges to local councils. In some cases, such delays in releases had led to court cases, threats of non-renewal of lease agreements and the payment of fines by Missions of the Ministry in the past.

    Passport processing

    The Ministry was unable to undertake its scheduled expansion programme to implement the processing of Biometric Passports within the country due to the non-availability of funding. This, the Committee noted, would amount to significant pressure on the future activities and other programmes of the Ministry as more resources would be needed to complete the process, given that the 2015 deadline for the eventual switch off to the machine readable Biometric Passport regime was fast approaching.

    Outlook for 2015

    In 2015, cognisant of its mission to assist in the formulation and implemen- tation of Ghana's Foreign Policy in the most efficient and cost-effective way, the Ministry intends to continue to assist government to deepen relations with our immediate neighbours, expand the frontiers of existing markets for Ghana's exports, attract investments into the various sectors of the economy and enhance consular protection and assistance to Ghanaians who are domiciled abroad.

    Specifically, the Ministry intends to:

    (a) promote and sustain political and economic interests abroad while promoting favourable perceptions about Ghana among principal political and economic actors;

    (b) promote the diversification and increase in the volume of exports through the promotion of Ghanaian products on foreign markets;

    (c) assist in making ECOWAS more effective by coordinating participation in meetings of the sub-regional body and providing reports on those meetings while promoting the implementation of the ECOWAS Protocols;

    (d) ensuring the articulation of Ghana's position at all levels of international politico-socio- economic discourse for the promotion of international peace, security and sustainable development;

    (e) pursue the safety and welfare of all Ghanaian citizens abroad at all times while mobilising them to assist in national develop- ment.

    (f) set up biometric passport processing centres in selected Ghana Missions abroad and fu r the r e s tab l i sh on- l ine application systems for biometric passports and visas.

    (g) develop the Ministry's human resource capacity through recruitment and training for efficient delivery

    (h) prioritise and complete ongoing projects of refurbishing and equipping Ghana Missions abroad; and

    (i) implement Annual Audit and Procurement plans as well as reports of the Auditor-General.

    2015 Budgetary allocation to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration

    In the light of the foregoing, a total amount of two hundred and seventy-one million, three hundred and twenty-four thousand and five hundred and nine Ghana cedis (GH¢271,324,509.00) made up of two hundred and ten million, six hundred and ninety-six thousand and nine hundred and sixty-nine Ghana cedis (¢210,696,969.00) from GoG Sources and sixty million, six hundred and twenty- seven thousand five hundred and forty Ghana cedis (GH¢60,627,540.00) from IGF Sources have been allocated for the realisation of the set objectives of the Ministry.

    Below is the breakdown of the allocation.
    SPACE FOR TABLES 2:07 p.m.

    Mr Isaac Osei (NPP - Subin) 2:07 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion.
    Mr Speaker, in spite of the difficulties faced by the Ministry in 2014, it was
    able to make some achievements in a number of areas. But I would like to add that with respect to the good neighbourliness policy, I believe that we should use that policy as a way of promoting the use of best practices within our country where we find them within the sub-region.
    For example, the mistakes which were made by some West African countries in the initial management of the Ebola Virus Disease may be a case in point. If we juxtapose this against the Nigerian experience, which brought some success, it is worth noting these for ourselves.
    The Ministry also has had the objective of developing and sustaining international goodwill and solidarity. I believe that in sustaining Ghana's international goodwill and image, it is critical that we have at post foreign service officers and other appointees whose conducts will reflect honour on themselves and our country.
    The recent case involving the Head of the Tokyo Mission is a case in point, and his recall and replacement shows that Ghana cannot tolerate Diplomats who fall foul of the law in their countries of accreditation.
    Mr Speaker, it is good to note that the Diaspora Affairs Bureau has been set up. I know that it is trying to address the concerns of Ghanaian, residing abroad. But equally important, Mr Speaker, while I believe that the focus is good, it is important that they consider engaging returnees; many of whom have settlements adjustment and integration issues when they return to our country.
    Mr Speaker, in the area of economic diplomacy, the Ministry would have to work in tandem with the Ministry of Trade and Industry to ensure that the net benefit of our signing on to the Economic Partnership Agreement(EPA) with the European Union (EU) accrues, to our country.
    Mr Speaker, talking about the welfare of Ghanaian citizens abroad, I believe the Ministry has to work very closely with the Ministry of Finance and the Bank of Ghana, to track the trajectory of remittances from our citizens living
    abroad with the view to maximising this contribution from them.
    Mr Speaker, the cedi depreciation in 2014 adversely affected the amount of foreign currency Missions received, a situation which sometimes led to very embarrassing moments for some of our Missions. Hopefully, now that the Ministry is able to retain its IGFs, I believe that some of these problems would be minimised.
    So, clearly, the three key constraints that I see the Ministry faces apart from the
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:15 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 2:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your permission, could we go to item number 6 on page 4 -- the Motion for the approval of the estimates for the National Labour Commission?
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:15 p.m.
    Very well,
    Hon Members, item 6, by the Majority Leader.
    Mr Agbesi 2:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your permission again -- the Majority Leader is engaged in another programme outside the Chamber. I would like to move -
    Mr First Deputy Speaker 2:15 p.m.
    Yes, you
    have the permission to go ahead and move it.
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 2:15 p.m.

    MR SECOND DEPUTY SPEAKER
    Chairman of the Committtee (Mr Joseph Zaphenat Amenowode) 2:18 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to second the Motion, asking this Hon- ourable House to approve the sum of GH¢2,700,476 for the National Labour Commission.
    Mr Speaker, in so doing, I present the Committe's Report.
    Introduction
    The Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Emmanuel Terkper in accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution and Standing Order 138, on Wednesday, 19th November, 2014, presented the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2015 fiscal year to the House.
    Pursuant to Standing Orders 140 (4) and 184 of the House, Mr Speaker referred the draft Annual Budget Estimates of the National Labour Commission to the Committee on Employment, Social Welfare and State Enterprises for consideration and report to the House.
    Acknowledgement
    The Committee met with the Chairman of the Board of the National Labour Commission, Mr Edward Briku-Boadu, the Acting Executive Secretary, Mrs Bernice Welbeck and officials of the National Labour Commission and deliberated on the 2015 Programme Based Budget Estimates of the National Labour Commission.
    The Committee is grateful to them for the information and support they provided during deliberations on the estimates.
    Reference Documents
    In considering the draft annual estimates for the Commission, the under- listed documents were used as reference materials:
    1. The 1992 Constitution of Ghana.
    2. T h e S t a n d i n g O r d e r s o f Parliament of Ghana.
    3. The 2014 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana.
    4. The 2014 Programme Based Budget Estimates of the National Labour Commission.
    5. The 2015 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Govern- ment of Ghana.
    6. The 2015 Programme Based Budget Estimates of the National Labour Commission.
    Mission Statement of the National Labour Commission
    The Mission Statement of the National Labour Commission for the 2015 fiscal year is to develop and promote a peaceful and harmonious industrial relations environ-ment through the use of effective dispute resolution practices within the context of the law, promotion of co- operation among the labour market players and mutual respect for their rights and responsibilities.
    Vision Statement of the National Labour Commission
    The vision of the Commission is to promote a peaceful and harmonious industrial relations environment, borne out of the firm understanding of and committed compliance with the labour laws by all stakeholders, to make the Ghanaian economy competitive to attract investments.
    Development Goals
    The development goal of the Commission is to become an efficient
    Chairman of the Committtee (Mr Joseph Zaphenat Amenowode) 2:18 p.m.


    and effective industrial dispute settlement institution, to create a peaceful and attractive environment for investment leading to accelerated growth, poverty reduction and attainment of middle income status by Ghana.

    Strategic Policy Objectives

    The strategic objectives of the National Labour Commission are to:

    1. facilitate and settle industrial disputes in accordance with the Labour Act, 2003 (Act 651),

    2. strengthen the capacity of the National Labour Commission to ensure speedy resolution of disputes;

    3. enforce rules and regulations governing labour administra- tions, international labour standards and ILO Conventions;

    4. promote social dialogue among the Tripartite Partners;

    5. strengthen the capacity of the Tripartite Partners;

    6. build staff capacity through training and development;

    7. deepen on going institution and internalisation and policy f o r m u l a - t i o n , p l a n n i n g , monitoring and evaluation systems at all levels;

    8. promote and protect the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees;

    9. increase the capacity of the Judiciary on Act 651 and its Labour Regulations, L.I. 1822 and L.I. 1833;

    10. improve the capacity of labour mediators and arbitrators; and

    11. promote an enabling environment and e ff ec t ive r egu la to ry f ramework fo r corpora te management.

    Funds allocated for the 2014 fiscal year

    For the implementation of activities for 2014, an amount of GH¢2,378,174 was allocated.

    The breakdown of the allocation is as follows:

    2014 Performance

    Activities for the 2014 fiscal year

    In the 2014 fiscal year, the Commission received 428 complaints from individual workers, groups of workers, workers associations, trade unions and employers. This involved about 1,850 workers. Out of the complaints received, 216 were settled and compensations of GH¢416,125.25 were received and paid to beneficiaries. The amount excludes payments made directly to beneficiaries.

    One hundred and sixty complaints rolled over from the previous year were also handled.

    The members of the Commission held 54 sittings and heard on the average 6 cases in a week. There were also 10 compulsory arbitration meetings to deal with disputes involving essential services.

    The Commission, upon hearing complaints on infringements or violations of the law, issued 23 directives and 27 orders or rulings.

    Nine officers and staff were trained at the Management Development and Productivity Institute in Accra on management procedures for two weeks.

    Strikes and lockouts

    Ten strikes were recorded in the year 2014. Eight of the strikes were by public sector workers and two were by private sector workers. The strikes from the public sector were mainly by education and health sector workers and lasted between one week and two months.

    The man hours lost to the strikes range between 40 hours per week and 160 hours per month. The longest period of strike was recorded by the education sector.

    One lockout was recorded within the period and it was done to protect life and property.

    Outstanding programmes for 2014

    The following programmes have been earmarked for 2014 but would be executed subject to the release of funds:

    1. One day interaction with the media on the work of the Commission.

    2. A stakeholders workshop for the health and education sectors.

    3. Development of a documentary/ drama on the key provisions of Act 651.

    4. Two-day sensitisation workshop for social partners in Tema on dispute settlement procedures.

    5. Two-day workshop for identified social partners on freedom of association and collective bargaining.

    Challenges

    The following were noted as challenges faced by the Commission in the 2014 fiscal year:

    The Commission has the mandate to inform and educate its social

    partners and stakeholders in labour on the labour laws in order to minimise or prevent disputes. The Commission was however, not able to carry out any of its training programmes due to the non-release of funds.

    Frequent increases in the prices of fuel and other utilities negatively impacted on the budget allocations of the Commission.

    Inadequate office space.

    Old and aged vehicles with associated huge service costs.

    Lack of effective maintenance of office equipment due to the lack of funds.

    Low number of staff.

    Low appreciation of the provisions of the labour law and management of employment relations.

    Lack of internal systems for addressing grievances in most enterprises, resulting in disputes.

    Entrenched positions by some parties during negotiations.

    Poor communication between labour and management.

    Non recognition of the requirement of the labour law during industrial disagreements.

    Outlook for 2015

    Funds allocated for the 2015 fiscal year

    For the implementation of activities for 2015, an amount of GH¢2,700,476 has been allocated.

    The breakdown of the allocation is as follows:
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:15 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Yes, the Ranking Member for Employment and-- Nobody? All right.
    Hon Minister?
    Minister for Employment and Labour Relation (Mr Haruna Iddrisu) (MP) 2:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I thank you for the opportunity to associate myself with the Motion moved on behalf of the Hon Majority Leader for that said amount of money of GH¢ 2,700,476.00, to support the activities of the National Labour Commission.
    Mr Speaker, it is such an important institution, recognising that industrial
    disputes are inevitable. We must be engaged in an effort as Government and as major employers to continue to maintain industrial peace and harmony in the country.
    The National Labour Commission works through mediators and arbitrators, and it is an important vehicle for addressing the grievances of the country.
    Our inability to manage, sometimes the legitimate issues and concerns of labour, leads to these inevitable conflicts, which have to be managed, and I believe that as is observed by the Committee, in the coming years, we could do better to support the work of the National Labour Commission.
    Thank you.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved:
    That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢2,700,476.00 for the services of the National Labour Commission.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:15 p.m.
    Deputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 2:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the item number 15, at page 6, for the Ministry of Petroleum and Power.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:15 p.m.
    What is written there is Ministry of Petroleum. I thought in the morning, I heard this discussion when they were approving the Minister, that there is now a Ministry for Petroleum and a Ministry for Power? I was listening.
    Mr Agbesi 2:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is what the Order Paper has captured. After saying so,
    we then seek your permission to make the necessary amendment.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:15 p.m.
    Hon Deputy Majority Leader, there was an Executive Instrument (E.I) that was brought to this House, and the E.I. indicated that there is no Ministry for Petroleum and Power. So, if the Order Paper has carried that, can you not correct it?
    Mr Agbesi 2:15 p.m.
    That is why I am saying that, after we have announced it to you, we seek your permission to make an amendment.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:15 p.m.
    So, I
    grant it. Give us the correction.
    Mr Agbesi 2:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the item 15 is for the estimates for the Ministries of Petroleum and - [Pause.]
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:15 p.m.
    All right. Fine. “Ministries of;” two Ministries. It means that this amount is for two Ministries? It does not say “Ministry of”, it says “Ministries of Petroleum and” - So, it is for two Ministries.
    Mr Agbesi 2:15 p.m.
    It is for the two Ministries.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:15 p.m.
    All
    right. Ministry of Petroleum. . . ?
    Hon Majority Leader, where is the Minister?
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, for us to be able to contribute, we should have copies of the Report as Hon Members of the House. Why are we here? Unless we have copies, how are we going to contribute? They should not go to only Committee members; they should go to all Hon Members of this House.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:25 p.m.
    Where is the Ranking Member? I am going to take comments on the - [Interruption.]
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we must all have copies.
    Mr Isaac Kwame Asiamah 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am a member but -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:25 p.m.
    Hold your peace because the Chairman is not even here. Where is the Chairman of the Committee?
    Hon Deputy Majority Leader, could we take another item?
    Mr Agbesi 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, while we are sorting it out, we could go to item number 4(d), laying of Papers.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:25 p.m.
    Hon Asiamah, is there - [Interruption]
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, my issue is that we are speaking to the 2015 Budget Statement. All these estimates are coming from this budget. When you go to page 89, for example, it talks about Ministry of Energy and Petroleum. There is nothing like Ministries of Power and those things.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:25 p.m.
    Do not worry, we will come there.
    Item number 4(d), Chairman of Committee.
    PAPERS 2:25 p.m.

    Mr Agbesi 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, item number 4 (f) (i) on page 3
    By the Chairman of the Committee --
    i) Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Annual Budget Estimates of the Ministries of Petroleum and Power for the year ending 31st December, 2015
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:25 p.m.
    Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, at this stage, we would want you to suspend the House for an hour.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:25 p.m.
    The House is -
    rose
    Mr Awuah 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, much as I

    Mr Speaker, unless the Chairman is telling us that they are not ready, but the Ranking Member keeps telling me that the Reports are ready.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, under item number 4 (f), we have some reports that are supposed to be laid. I do not know whether they are not ready. If they are, they could be laid. Then while the House is suspended, they are distributed to the Hon Members, so that when we return, we can meaningfully contribute
    to the debate.
    Mr Agbesi 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Chairman of the Committee has just informed me that the Papers are ready to be laid. So, we could continue with item number 4 (f) (ii), (iii), (iv), and (v).
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:25 p.m.
    Item 4(f) (ii), Chairman of the Committee?
    By the Chairman of the Committee ,--
    ii) Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited relating to a 360MW Combined Cycle Dual Fuel Power Plant Facility at Aboadze.
    (iii) Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Energy Conversion Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana, Jel Oil and Gas Ghana Limited and Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited, relating to a 360MW Combined Cycle Dual Fuel Power Plant Facility at Aboadze.
    (iv) Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Amandi Energy Limited, relat ing to a 190-240MW Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze.
    (v) Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Addendum to the Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Amandi Energy Limited relating to a 190- 240MW Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:25 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Deputy Majority Leader, could we
    not go to item number 4(g)?
    Mr Agbesi 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Minister for Employment and Labour Relations has just informed me that item number 26 is ready. That is the Youth Employment Bill at the Consideration Stage. So, with your permission, we may take item number 26.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:25 p.m.
    So, as we are considering item number 26, if any of the reports are ready, we would terminate or suspend our discussion on item 26 and continue with that or...?
    Mr Agbesi 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the reports are not ready. So, let us go on with the Bill.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:25 p.m.
    I agree with you but I am saying that -
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:25 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Member?
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am a bit lost. The Hon Deputy Majority Leader asked for suspension for about an hour before that, for the reports to be laid. Now, he is saying that we should continue with consideration of a Bill. The way we are conducting business is not very good.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    It does not matter.
    Dr A. A. Osei 2:35 p.m.
    It does not help any of us.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    He has changed his mind.
    The Youth Employment Agency Bill at the Consideration Stage.
    Mr Agbesi 2:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, at the time we made the request, the reports were not ready and the Minister in charge of this
    Bill was also not available at that time. Now, he is ready; they wanted us to work and we are working.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    Hon Member for Sekondi?
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 2:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I note that probably, one of the most consistent things about the Hon Deputy Majority Leader is his inconsistency -- [Interruption]
    rose
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 2:35 p.m.
    Having said that, Mr Speaker, the Youth Agency Bill, I believe albeit important to Government.
    I withdraw the statement I made about my classmate and I apologise to him.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    I know you spent five years together in the same class.
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 2:35 p.m.
    Yes. We were very close. I have withdrawn the statement. It was made in jest; I did not intend the statement to be taken serious. His head is shining like mine. But Mr Speaker -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    You said something about shining?
    Papa Owusu-Ankomah 2:35 p.m.
    I said his head is shining like mine.
    Mr Speaker, with regard to the consideration of this Bill, if we could go and restore ourselves to some personal comforts and return, we can attack it with seriousness. It does not seem we have even a sizeable number here, but this is a Bill that during the Second Reading stage - very seriously, serious issues were raised. It is at the tail end.
    I wonder why out of turn, the Hon Deputy Majority Leader, having said that we should suspend for now, has acceded to the request.
    I was helping that if the reports are

    ready, let us lay them -- now - he has not even applied to withdraw his request made to you - he is saying that we should continue.

    But I think that yes, if we have to deal with this Bill just for the two days left for this House, we have to do it, for lack of a better expression, with a lot of seriousness.

    The numbers are few. The Hon Ranking Member on the Minority side is not here - because we were made to understand by Mr Speaker, that estimates were going to take precedence over all other matters.

    Mr Speaker, the Subsidiary Legislation Committee is meeting. So, let us suspend for one hour and then we can come back.

    The Hon pro tempore Leader of Government Business can then arrange to get all Hon Members in committees to come, so that we would consider the Bill.

    That is my humble request.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    Hon Member, I know that this morning, your intention is to take the Report. I have just looked at the Order Paper and I have noticed that there are amendments in the names of individual Hon Members of Parliament.
    For example, there are a number of amendments in the name of the Hon Chairman of the Subsidiary Legislation Committee, whom I know, is currently seriously working on Government Business.
    They are considering fees and other things on the new block. So, I do not think that if we take this out of turn -- at the moment, even when it comes to the amendment proposed by Hon Members -- I see Mr Osei Bonsu; I see Mr K. O. Darko-Mensah -- how are we going to deal with that?
    So, please, if you think we should suspend for a short while - I was against suspension today - we can suspend and
    then of course, the Leadership of both sides of the House would get their Hon Members here. If we come back and there are no reports and we are proceeding with the Bill, if you propose the amendments and they are not here, then nobody is to be blamed.
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    Your first suggestion is rather the more suitable one in the circumstances.
    Yes, Hon K. T. Hammond, do you have a point of order against me?
    Mr Hammond 2:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what I was thinking is that, the item numbered 4 (f) (i), (ii) to the (v) are all ready - [Interuption.]
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    We have passed that stage Hon K. T. Hammond, we have laid them.
    Hon Deputy Majority Leader, Hon Minority Leader, the House is accordingly suspended for one hour. The time is 2.38 p.m. we shall reconvene at 3.38.
    Thank you.
    2.39 p.m. - Sitting suspended.
    4.25 p.m. -- Sitting resumed.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Abgesi 2:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, item number 8 on page 5.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    Hon Minister?
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 2:35 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Joseph Z. Amenowode) 2:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to support the Motion that this Hon House approves the sum of GH¢43,787,365.00 for the services of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations for the year ending 31st December, 2015.
    Mr Speaker in doing so, I present your Committees's Report.
    Introduction
    The Hon Minister for Finance and Economic Planning, Mr. Seth Emmanuel Terkper in accordance with Article 179 of the 1992 Constitution and Standing Order 138 on Wednesday 19th November,

    2014 presented the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2015 fiscal year to the House.

    Pursuant to Standing Orders 140(4) and 184 of the House, Mr Speaker referred the Annual Budget Estimates of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations to the Committee on Employment, Social Welfare and State Enterprises for consideration and report to the House.

    Acknowledgement

    The Committee met with the following to deliberate on the 2015 Annual Estimates of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations:

    1. The Minister for Employment and Labour Relations, Hon Haruna Iddrisu.

    2. The Deputy Minis ter for Employment and Labour Relations, Hon Mohammed Baaba Jamal Ahmed.

    3. Directors and officials from the following departments and agencies:

    a. Ministry headquarters

    b. Labour Department

    c . D e p a r t m e n t o f Factories Inspectorate

    d. Department of Co-operatives

    e . M a n a g e m e n t Development and Productivity Institute

    f . N a t i o n a l Vo c a t i o n a l

    Training Institute

    g. Organisation of African

    Trade Union Unity

    h . O p p o r t u n i t y Industrialisation Centre

    i. Ghana Co-operative Council

    j . In tegra ted Communi ty Centre for Employable Skills

    k . F a i r W a g e s a n d Salaries Commission

    l. National Pensions Authority

    m . G h a n a Y o u t h Entrepreneurial a n d Employment Development Agency

    (GYEEDA)

    n. Ministry of Finance

    The Committee is grateful for the information and support provided by all those who participated in the deliberations on the draft annual estimates of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations for the 2015 fiscal year.

    Reference Documents

    In considering the annual estimates for the Ministry, the underlisted documents were used as reference materials:

    1. The 1992 Constitution of Ghana

    2. T h e S t a n d i n g O r d e r s o f Parliament of Ghana

    3. The 2014 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Govern- ment of Ghana

    4. The 2014 Annual Estimates of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations

    5. The 2015 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the

    Government of Ghana.

    6. The 2015 Annual Estimates of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations.

    Mission Statement

    The Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations exists to co-ordinate employment opportunities and labour- related interventions in all sectors as well as promote decent jobs and ensure harmonious labour relations in Ghana

    Strategic policy objectives

    The strategic policy objectives of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations for 2015 are to:

    improve the policy environment and institutional capacity for the effective human capacity develop- ment and employment policy management;

    create opportunities for accelerated job creation across all sectors;

    enhance labour productivity across all sectors;

    improve work place safety and health;

    enhance labour administration and promote harmonious labour relations;

    protect children against abuse and exploitation;

    provide t imely, rel iable and disaggregated labour market data for effective planning and programming;

    ensure provision of adequate

    training and skills development in line with global trends; and

    encourage the formation of small business enterprises through the co-operative system;

    Core functions of the Ministry

    The Ministry performs the following core functions:

    Initiate, formulate and co-ordinate sector policies and programmes, as well as schemes to ensure sustainable, accelerated employ- ment-generation and human capital development.

    Develop strategies and mechanisms to ensure and promote industrial peace and harmony.

    Develop and periodically review all legal and policy instruments for the sector.

    Ensure the development and review of labour market information management systems, to facilitate the availability of timely, relevant and accurate national employment and labour statistics.

    Coordinate all national employment initiatives with the collaboration of relevant stakeholders of the economy.

    Ensure the moni tor ing and evaluation of sector policies, programmes and projects in relation to gainful employment-generation and the promotion of industrial harmony.

    Promote best management practices, systems and procedures in all sectors of the economy to enhance productivity.
    SPACE FOR TABLE 2:35 p.m.

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    SPACE FOR PROGRAMME - 2:35 p.m.

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    SPACE FOR PAGE 2:35 p.m.

    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    Ranking Member. Who is the Ranking Member for this Committee? - [Interruption] -- Are there any of your Committee members here?
    Yes?
    Mr Frank Annoh-Dompreh (NPP - Nsawam-Adoagyiri) 2:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, thank you for the opportunity --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    Are you a member of the Committee?
    Mr Annoh-Dompreh 2:35 p.m.
    No! I am not.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    Is there any member of the Committee on Employment, Social Welfare and State Enterprises here?SPACE FOR TABLE 5 - PAGE 16 - 4.25P.M.
    Mr Annoh-Dompreh 2:35 p.m.
    Yes.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    Please, speak.
    Mr Annoh-Dompreh 2:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to support the Motion on the floor, and to make a terse statement.
    Page 10 of the Report talks about child labour, and it goes ahead to explain efforts by the Ministry to forestall child labour.
    Mr Speaker, I recall vividly a number of reports that we have had as a country especially from the cocoa growing areas where seemingly, the incidence of child labour appears to be on the rise. I would wish to take this opportunity to appeal to the Minister, that the Ministry should begin to revert their minds to this incidence because, yes, we are signatories of a number of relevant international protocols which bar some of these incidents.
    So, it casts some slur on Ghana among the comity of nations. It is in that aspect that I
    would want to make a passionate appeal to the Hon Minister to revert his mind to.
    On page 5 of the Report, core functions of the Ministry, interestingly, captures among other things, developing strategies and mechanisms to ensure and promote industrial peace and harmony.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    Hon Member, thank you for intervening so eloquently. I can see the Hon Ranking Member is coming. So, you will conclude -- [Laughter] -- Then I will call on the Hon Member.
    Yes, you would conclude.
    Mr Annoh-Dompreh 2:35 p.m.
    On that note, Mr Speaker, with the greatest respect of your high office, I would want that we develop strategies and mechanisms to ensure and promote industrial peace and harmony.
    Mr Speaker, in recent times, we have had consistent and repeated -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 2:35 p.m.
    Thank you. God bless you.
    Mr Annoh-Dompreh 2:35 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Benjamin K. Ayeh (NPP - Upper Denkyira West) 4:35 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the opportunity to contribute to the Motion on the floor.
    Mr Speaker, the Ministry of Employ- ment and Labour Relations is one of the most important Ministries, perhaps, second to Education and Health. Unfortunately, over the years, this Ministry has been under-funded, and even the little that is normally released to it, looking at the figures for 2014 do not also come on time.
    The irony of it, like the other Ministries,
    although we all complain that the Ministries are under-funded and resources are not released on time to enable them do their work when our Hon Colleagues from the other side take any public platform, they try to create the impression that it is rosy out there.
    However, I believe this Ministry has a unique opportunity this time round to raise some funds for itself, that is, if the Bill before us in connection with the Youth Employment Agency should receive the approval of this House.
    Mr Speaker, however, if you look at the mandate of some of the agencies that fall under this Ministry and the resources that is made available to them vis-à-vis their achievements and performance, one wonders why these agencies are not being resourced to do their work.
    Let me take a couple of them. If you take the National Vocational Training Institute (NVTI), Mr Speaker, the mandate of this institute is to develop human resource through skills training and retraining through the creation of employment. Again, they are supposed to co-ordinate at the national level all aspects of vocational training including apprenticeship as per the parent Ministry's mandate, yet if you go to page 6 of their Report, if you leave out compensation, only a paltry sum of GH¢9,960.00 was made available to this institution.
    Mr Speaker, putting all the various students at the various centres under the NVTI together, this institution was able to train not less than six to seven thousand students. The question is, could they have done better if much resources had been made available to them?
    Mr Speaker, if you look at the
    Opportunities Industrialisation Centre Ghana (OICG), its mandate is like the NVTI, they are also supposed to train a lot of our unemployed youth. Then you look at Integrated Community Centres for Employable Skills (ICCES), they equally have this same mandate. Yet, they all suffer the same circumstance like NVTI -- lack of resources.
    That brings me to the Youth Employment
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
    Thank you also for your comprehensive contribution.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved.
    That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢43,787,365 for the services of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations for the year ending 31st December,
    2015.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
    Hon Akoto Osei?
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, before we suspended the session, we were informed that while we were away, the Reports of
    the Ministry of Energy would be given to us. It has been almost two hours now and I have not seen a copy of any of those Reports from f (i) to f (v).
    We do not get the Report and they are going to bring it here and expect us to contribute. I think something has gone -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
    They are working on it.
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, so, we are going to get it and in five minutes, we are supposed to make informed contributions on these estimates, on Agreements that most of us would not have read? I think we are doing ourselves some favour.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
    Thank you very much.
    I have been informed that they are running some photocopies as we speak. So, let us continue with the estimates and when we get to the bridge, we will cross it.
    Thank you very much for your kind intervention.
    Hon Deputy Majority Leader?
    Mr Agbesi 4:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we thank Hon Dr Akoto Osei for drawing our attention. But while we are on it and waiting for those Reports, we can go on with others which are ready.
    It is the turn of Ministry of Roads and Highways as captured in item 12 on page 5 of the Order Paper.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Hon Minister?
    Is that the Deputy Minister? I think you sought permission after -
    Mr Agbesi 4:35 p.m.
    Sorry, Mr Speaker.
    We want to seek your permission and the indulgence of the House for the Deputy Minister to take that.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
    Permission has been granted.
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 4:35 p.m.

    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
    Once you mentioned the figure, I thought you had finished. Or you want to -
    Mr I. A. Mensah 4:35 p.m.
    Just a bit of expatiation.
    The Ministry of Roads and Highways has an oversight responsibility for the roads and transport sector, which comprises road infrastructure, road maintenance, financing and training. The department and agencies that operate under the direct ambit of the Ministry of Roads and Highways are (1):
    The Road Infrastructure Section.
    Ghana Highways Authority.
    the Department of Feeder Roads. The Department of Urban Roads.
    Training and Road Financing, which comprises the Ghana Road Fund Secretariat and the Koforidua Training Centre.
    Mr Speaker, the underlining objectives for the preparation and implementation of the 2015 Fiscal Policy of the Ministry of Roads and Highways and its agencies are to ensure effective linkages with seven relevant thematic areas of the Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda for the greater impact in Government's overall objective of reducing poverty and creating
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
    Deputy Minister, what document are you reading from?
    Mr I. A. Mensah 4:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am reading from a summary of -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
    What document are you reading from?
    Mr I. A. Mensah 4:35 p.m.
    I wish to reiterate that the allocation for the Goods and Services and Assets would greatly affect the overall deliverables and the outcomes set out for the roads and highways the transport sector, especially in the maintenance of road network.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Chairman of the Committee?
    Question Proposed.
    Chairman of the Committee (Mr Michael C. Boampong) 4:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to support the Motion and in doing so, I wish to present your Committee's Report. Introduction

    In fulfilment of article 179 of the 1992 Constitution, the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of Government for 2015 financial year was presented to the House by the Hon Minister for Finance on Wednesday, 19th November, 2014.

    In accordance with the Standing Orders 140 (4) and 189 of the House, the annual budget estimates for 2015 fiscal year for the Ministry of Roads and Highways (MR&H) were referred to the Committee on Roads and Transport for consideration and report.

    The Committee met on the estimates with the Deputy Sector Minister, Hon. Isaac Adjei Mensah, heads of Department and agencies under the sector Ministry and the schedule officer from the Ministry of Finance.

    The estimates considered covered the main Ministry and the underlisted departments and agencies:

    (i) Ghana Highway Authority

    (GHA).

    (ii) Department of Urban Roads

    (DUR).

    (iii) Department of Feeder Roads (DFR).

    (iv) Ghana Road Fund (GRF).

    (v) Koforidua Training Centre

    (KTC).

    Reference Documents

    The following documents were referred to by the Committee:

    i) The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.

    ii) T h e S t a n d i n g O r d e r s o f

    Parliament of Ghana.

    iii) The Budget Statement and E c o n o m i c P o l i c y o f t h e Government of Ghana for the 2015 financial year:

    iv) The Medium-Term-Expenditure Framework (MTEF) for 2015- 2017 Programme Based Budget Estimates.

    v) The Report of the Committee on the 2014 Budget Estimates for the Ministry of Roads and Highways.

    Mission of the Ministry of Roads and Highways (MRH)

    MRH exists to provide an integrated, efficient, cost-effective and sustainable road transport system responsive to the needs of society, supporting growth and poverty reduction and capable of establishing and maintaining Ghana as a transportation hub of West Africa.

    Policy Objectives of the MRH

    The policy objectives relevant to the Road Sector as outlined in the Medium- Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) for MRH for 2015 -- 2017 are:

    Establish Ghana as a Transporta- tion hub.

    Create a sustainable, accessible, affordable, reliable, effective and efficient transport system that meets user needs.

    Integrate land use, transport planning, development planning and service provision. Create a vibrant investment and performance based management environment that maximises benefits for public and private sector investors.

    D e v e l o p a n d i m p l e m e n t comprehen-sive and integrated policy, governance; and institutional frameworks.

    Ensure sustainable development in the transport sector.

    Develop adequate human resources and apply new technology.

    Performance of the road sector as at September, 2014

    Maintenance of Road Asset

    MRH in protecting investments made in road infrastructure, undertook routine maintenance on 13,459 kilometres of trunk road network, 7,269 kilometres of feeder road network and 4,735kilometres of upgrading and pothole patching on Urban road network.

    Re-gravelling/spot improvement and resealing works were carried out on 76 kilometres, 776 kilometre, and 645kilometres stretches of trunk, feeder and urban road networks respectively as part of the periodic maintenance activities.

    Improv ing Road Maintenance Financing

    As at September, 2014, MR&H has been able to mobilised an amount of GH¢215.66 million into the Ghana Road Fund.

    Development of key road corridors

    Rehabilitation, reconstruction, con- struction and upgrading works continued on the major road corridors. Some of the road networks that were worked on in the year under review include the Dodo-Pepesu Nkwanta Road (63%), Agona Junction to Elubo Road (58%), Accra East Corridor Roads - Giffard and Burma Camp Roads, (89%), Tetteh Quarshie - Madina (96%), Buipe - Tamale

    (98%), Tarkwa Bogoso - Ayamfuri (46%), Awoshie - Pokuase Road (97%), Fufulso - Sawla (92%), Kasoa bypass (37%), Kwame Nkrumah Interchange (62%), Polo Grounds bypass (92%) and Ayamfuri - Asawinso (36%).

    In all, a total of 101.2kilmetres of

    development works (representing 52 per cent of approved programme for trunk roads), 286 kilometres (representing 75 per cent of approved programme for feeder roads) and 10 kilometres (representing 10 per cent of approved programme for urban roads) were executed. A total of 12 bridges on feeder roads had also been constructed as at September, 2014.

    Controlling Axle Load and Implemen- tation of Sub-Regional Programmes

    MRH continued with the implemen- tation of the law on the axle load limit as stipulated in the New Road Traffic Regulation, LI 2180. Overloading is now reported as less than 10 per cent for vehicles weighed at the various axle load control stations.

    Workshops were organised for Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) and other stakeholders on improving trade facilitation along Ghana's transit corridors.

    The construction of a Joint Border Post (JBP) at Noepe for Ghana and Togo is almost completed and training of border agencies was undertaken.

    Public Private Partnerships (PPP)

    Under the PPP Scheme for the financing, construction and management of road infrastructure, the pre-feasibility study on the Accra-Takoradi Road was completed. Packaging and documentation by a transaction adviser for the Accra- Kumasi road was ongoing during the year.

    Procurement of a transaction adviser
    SPACE FOR TABLE 4:35 p.m.

    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:35 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Hon Member?
    The spirit of today is speed and I know you are a man of speed.
    Mr Kwabena Owusu-Aduomi (NPP - Ejisu) 4:45 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for the honour done me to support the Motion on the floor.
    The main challenge facing the Ministry of Roads and Highways has been inadequate funding of projects that the Ministry undertakes through its three agencies, namely, the Ghana Highways Authority, the Department of Feeder Roads and the Department of
    -- 4:45 p.m.

    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:45 p.m.
    I know you are concluding. Continue; I know you are winding up.
    Mr Owusu-Aduomi 4:45 p.m.
    All right, Mr Speaker -- [Interruption]
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:45 p.m.
    Hon Minister for Finance, do you have a point of order?
    Mr Terkper 4:45 p.m.
    Yes, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker, the point being made is misleading to the House.
    Mr Speaker, we debated on this floor the strategy for financing capital projects. And we made it clear that we were moving away from the position, which was staunchly defended. I recall, in the debate, that we could put projects on the Budget Statement without the source of financing.
    We had been clearing those projects, which were put on the Budget Statement without a source of financing and moving on to financing of our own new projects.
    Mr Speaker, therefore, it is erroneous to give the impression that we do not have a plan; we do have a plan, which includes a plan for the clearance of arrears for the very projects. This mainly includes road projects that were put on the Budget Statement without the source of financing.
    Mr Owusu-Aduomi 4:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it seems the Minister for Finance just jumped in. I had not finished with my delivery.
    Mr Speaker, in the 2005 Budget Statement, when you go to page 175, it is the Government's intention to clear all road arrears by 2015, so that by 2016 and 2017, there would be no arrears.
    But Mr Speaker, an amount of only GH¢322.3 million has been provided for in the Budget Statement. As we speak now, when I checked from the Ministries, the arrears are over GH¢801 million.
    So, Mr Speaker, yes, there is but is the amount provided in the Budget Statement even adequate for now? Mr Speaker, in my view, the Government ought to get committed to the overall clearance of the road arrears in order to salvage all roads from total collapse.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:45 p.m.
    Hon Member, excuse me for a second. Please, resume your seat -- [Pause.]
    You have not finished. I was hoping -
    Hon Agbesi, please, wait; be patient.
    We have to realise that we must keep quite, so that we finish in time. Somebody says I must tell you to keep quite but I will not respond to that. I will pretend I did not hear.
    Hon Member, continue.
    Mr Owusu-Aduomi 4:55 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker, I said the disbursement of Goods and Services since 2009 has been the least of the disbursed items allocated to this Ministry. Mr Speaker, for 2014, when you go to page numbered 6, table numbered 1 of the Committee's Report, not even one per cent of the amount for Goods and Services has been released.
    Mr Speaker, the untimely disbursement of Goods and Services and the small amount impede project supervision and monitoring by the agencies, which usually leads to projects not executed in accordance with specification require- ment or what you would usually call shoddy jobs.
    Mr Speaker, the Government takes delight in awarding a lot of projects -- big and huge projects. But we do not make provision for supervision of these projects. This is because if they award numerous projects, but the goods and services allocation that would provide the agencies with fuel, maintenance of their vehicles,
    allowances for staff and others, not even one per cent has been released -- So Mr Speaker, how do the agencies supervise their projects?
    Mr Speaker, it is not only supervision but maintenance of office facilities, which they do not have. Road inventory and design become standstill; human resource capacity building is also a problem. So Mr Speaker, the release for Goods and Services does not help the agencies at all in their supervision work.
    M r S p e a k e r , m y l a s t p o i n t . The Ministry's planned budget is GH¢4,133,088,630 as per page 9, table 2 of our Report. Mr Speaker, only 23 per
    cent has been approved; it is not even up to a billion.
    Even cutting grass along our roadsides, Mr Speaker, payment for work done is up to July, 2013.
    Mr Speaker, on trunk roads, the arrears is seventeen months - Cutting grass; simply cutting grass along our roads - arrears are seventeen months - This is incredible Mr Speaker, let alone going to pay for pothole patching and others -
    Mr Speaker, the Government should relook into the Ministry of Roads and Highways challenges and be reminded by the poor roads scattered all over the country and inject more funds into the road sector to preserve the huge investment that the nation has made in road infrastructure and related facilities over the years.
    Mr Speaker, the Ministry should be given additional funds in the 2015 fiscal year in order to salvage our roads from total collapse.
    Mr Speaker, with these few words, I wish to thank you for the opportunity.

    An Hon Member - rose -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Hon Member, I have not recognised you, please.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 4:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, if you can take maybe, maximum of two submissions from either side. That is, if people are there and they are minded to contribute - A maximum of two. Maybe,
    the second person would be given a shorter time.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    I want to hear from the Hon Majority Leader.
    A shorter time like how many minutes? That is a major amendment to the gentleman's agreement. So, I want to hear from the Hon Majority Leader.
    Mr Bagbin 4:55 p.m.
    Well, at the briefing this morning, my Hon Colleague was not there but he used the word “maximum”. So, I do not have a problem with that. This is because we agreed that after the Motion is moved and seconded, if there is no good reason, then we should put the Question but if there is a good reason and Hon Members want to contribute, we could do that.
    So, with his term “maximum of two”, I have no problem.
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    “Maxi-
    mum”?
    Mr Bagbin 4:55 p.m.
    Two persons from each side of the House.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    All right -
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:55 p.m.
    I would want to understand. He said if there is good reason; how are we supposed to know whether there is good reason?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    It is like equity -
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, equity -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    Hon Akoto Osei, equity used to be as long as
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, my worry is that -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    Do not worry.
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is important. We would not get the chance to do this again because some areas need more discussion.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    Do not worry. How do you know -
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:55 p.m.
    Then we would come
    and sit here - if that is it, some of us will just -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    No, Hon Akoto Osei -
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:55 p.m.
    I am worried about some issues -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    Hon Akoto Osei, if you leave, you will be sorely missed and I am sure that “good reason” will be good reason.
    Hon Member?
    Mr Kwaku Agyeman Kwarteng (NPP-Obuasi West) 4:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I will like to point to page 6 of the Report where the Agency Performance analysis as at September -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    Hon Members, let us have some order. I do not know where the noise is coming from, whether from the Press Gallery. Let us have some order.
    We cannot have a total breakdown of law and order; everybody is having some chats. Those who are having chats, I am looking at you. Stop it, please. Do not have the chats; listen.
    Three minutes - the time is 4.57 p.m.
    Mr Kwarteng 4:55 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker. I am looking at page 6 of the Report--
    the performance analysis for the first three quarters of 2014 and in the first column, it says, “Expenditure items”. It goes on to list the expenditure items as compensation, goods and services and assets.
    Under that we have donor and internally generated fund (IGFs), ABFA allocation listed as expenditure.
    Mr Speaker, it cannot be that IGFs are an expenditure. I see that format in many other Reports, but what it does is that, it hides what those items are used for. What IGFs, for instance, are used for - because IGFs will be used for compensation, goods and services or assets. We cannot just put IGFs to indicate those expenditures that were made from IGFs without disclosing, as it is, what exactly those sources were used for. We will see that again when we look at the projection for 2015 on page 9. You have again IGFs a little over GH¢5million indicated there. It is hard to know how that money will be used.

    I go to the Budget Statement and on Appendix 4 (b), we see a similar format except that -
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader, do you have a point of order?
    Mr Bagbin 4:55 p.m.
    That is so, Mr Speaker.
    IGFs, according to the rules, are used for goods and services. They do not use IGFs for compensation; they do not use them for assets. That is the rule. So, it is for goods and services. [Interruption.] IGFs --
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:55 p.m.
    The entire compensation
    - 4:55 p.m.

    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    Do you -
    Mr Kwarteng 4:55 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    I refer -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    Hon Member for Obuasi West, do you want to yield to Hon Akoto Osei? [Interruption.]
    All right.
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:55 p.m.
    Yes, I am sure the Hon Majority Leader is aware that the entire compensation budget of Ghana Investments Promotion Council (GIPC) comes from IGFs. [Interruption.] That budget for GIPC comes from the IGFs. So if the Hon Majority Leader syas IGFs are not used for compensation, he is wrong. The entire compensation of GIPC comes from IGFs. If he is not aware, I have given him that information. [Interruption.] They not used for compensation. I am saying that it cannot be the case. The entire compensation of GIPC is from IGFs. It is a fact - [Interruption.]
    He says the IGFs are not used for compensation and I am saying it is not true. [Interruption.] It is not true.
    Mr Bagbin 4:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he was in the Ministry of Finance and they issued the guidelines for the utilisation of IGFs. In the
    guidelines, there is nowhere that is stated that we should use IGFs for compensation. If there is any misapplication somewhere, he can raise that. But as a rule, they cannot use IGFs for compensation.
    Dr A. A. Osei 4:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he said I was in the Ministry of Finance. I am not there now. [Interruption] Yes, he said I was - but I am saying, as I speak today, the budget we passed for GIPC suggests that they use IGFs for compensation. I do not know what guidelines have been issued. [Interruption.] Yes, when I was there, we issued those guidelines. I will check to see what guidelines have - Ministry of Health - it is the same.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Member?
    Mr Kwarteng 4:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would like to refer the Hon Majority Leader to appendix 4(b), specifically the Office of Government Machinery. For 2015, they are projecting a total IGFs of about GH¢91.2 million.
    Of that amount, they are looking to spend GH¢440,000.00 on wages and salaries. This is from the budget. They are looking to spend about GH¢49 million on goods and services and about GH¢42 million on capital expenditure.
    So, it cannot be that the Office of Government Machinery itself is doing what the Hon Majority Leader said we should not be doing.
    Mr Speaker, the point I am making is that, if they do not do it the way it is done in the main Budget Statement, so that we know that how the IGFs are being spent -- and it is indicated here as though it was an expenditure; it hides how we are spending internally generated funds.
    It is just to make the point that going forward - and I say this because Mr Speaker, we see it in many of the other Reports too. Going forward, whatever IGFs are indicated as an expenditure, we should know specifically how the IGFs were used.
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 4:55 p.m.
    Do you
    have a point of order?
    Mr Mutawakilu Adam 4:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he just indicated that they should indicate how the IGFs are used. This is the Budget Statement. After the Budget Statement, they have the oversight responsibility to call for their annual programme of action. Therefore, they have the opportunity to ask for details of previous years' expenditure.
    So, we should not just look at it like when they provide IGFs, they must bring every detail. All the MMDAs are under committees and next year, we can ask them to come with their programme of activities for the year for a review of the previous year.
    When you are submitting a report on that, you can now pinpoint what they have been used for, what you think was not properly done. This should not be asking for many details. Last year, we had the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) that was not detailed and therefore, you could follow up. But this year, the MTEF was not detailed. But we have an opportunity for the oversight responsibility that we are expected to do to scrutinise this expenditure.
    Thank you.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:05 p.m.
    I will put the Question.
    Mr Kwarteng — rose -
    Mr Kwarteng 5:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, my Hon Colleague has misunderstood what I said. If you expend monies allocated to you as Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDA) and you are accounting to this House how that money was used, you ought to tell us clearly the IGFs that you generated and how they were used. The format is clear in the Budget Statement.
    It is not for anybody, after you have presented it to this House, to come and ask you. So, it is just for the purposes of transparency, Mr Speaker, that I make this point.
    We should take it on board and get going forward; we get that breakdown. It is just good for the House.
    Thank you.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved:
    That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢931,657,410 for the services of the Ministry of Roads and Highways for the year ending 31st December, 2015.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:05 p.m.
    There are five people in this House who are constantly talking. Let me remind them that there is a coffee space just at the back. So, if they want to have a chat, they should go and have their chat outside. [Interruption.] Yes, about five people who are constantly talking, one of them just shouted across - [Laughter.]
    It is 5 o'clock; let us do some work.
    Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 5:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your
    kind permission, we will now take item number 13, which is at page 6 of the Order Paper.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:05 p.m.
    Item number 13, Minister for Education?
    Madam, we have a certain procedure, be very brief. Move your Motion briefly.
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 5:05 p.m.

    Minister for Education (Prof. Naana Jane Opoku-Agyemang) 5:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢6,740,437,383 for the services of the Ministry of Education for the year ending 31st December, 2015.
    The breakdown is as follows:
    i. GoG -- GH¢5,277,919.300
    ii. IGFs -- GH¢1,306,754,981
    iii. Donor Fund -- GH¢155,763,101
    Mr Speaker, the amount is required to be disbursed for the Ministry's activities in respect of Compensation of Employees, Goods and Services and Capital Expenditure (Assets).
    The breakdown is as follows:
    i. Compensation -- GH¢4,914,366,857
    (73%)
    ii. Goods and Services -- GH¢1,434,777,524
    (21%)
    iii. Capital Expenditure
    (Assets) -- GH¢391,293,002 (6%)
    Policy Focus for 2015
    Mr Speaker, in 2015, the Ministry will intensify work towards the achievement of its priority objectives as captured in the Education Strategic Plan and the National Medium Term Development Framework. In this connection, the Ministry will focus on the following key policy areas:
    Improving management efficiency
    Improving equitable access to and participation in education and training.
    Improving the quality of teaching and learning outcomes especially in mathematics and science.
    Promoting life skills and training.
    Operational Focus for 2015
    Mr Speaker, the amount for which approval of this august House is being sought for will facilitate the implementation of the Ministry's operations in 2015. Principal among these are:
    Implementation of progressively free SHS to benefit an estimated number of 367,565 day students across the country in 2015/2016 acadmic year.
    Procurement of 500,000 school uniforms for distribution to needy pupils in basic schools across the country.
    Procurement of 15,000,000 exercise books for distribution to students in 36,685 basic schools across the country, and other social inter- vention programmes.

    Procurement of 6,000,000 textbooks for distribution to public basic schools.

    Reforming the teaching and learning of mathematics and science at basic level, by providing equipment in basic mathematics and science and train mathematics and science teachers, master coaches and teacher educators.

    Implementation of the last phase of Science Resource Centre Project to benefit 100 SHS, to help improve the ratio of science students at the tertiary level.

    Revamping of demand-driven vocational and technical employable skills training programmes to equip artisans with requisite skills needed by industries. Under this, a total of 47,809 persons will be trained in various trades.

    Strengthening and revamping of the Graduate Support Scheme (GEBSS) and providing entrepreneurial/ business development skills to 4,000 unemployed graduates.

    Continuing with work to complete the Schools Under Trees Initiative, building dormitories for Secondary Schools and initiating the con- struction of 10 new colleges of education.

    Initiating the construction of additional fifty (50) community day secondary schools.

    Mr Speaker, under various donor support initiatives, the Ministry will implement activities to benefit more children in 2015. These are:

    The Global Partnership for Education Project under Government, will provide scholarships package of school uniforms, sandals and stationery for 55,000 girls in JHS.

    Under the Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP), 75 existing schools will be supported to improve their quality, in addition to 50 existing schools which will be supported to upgrade their facilities and improve quality. Under the project, 10,400 needy students will be provided with scholarships.

    Under the Department for Inter- national Development (DfID), Girls' Participatory Approach of Student Success (PASS) Programme, 45,000 girls will be supported to complete

    JHS.

    Mr Speaker, I beg to move for the approval of the total amount of six billion, seven hundred and forty million, four hundred and thirty-seven thousand, three hundred and eighty-three Ghana cedis (GH¢6,740,437,383) for the implementation of the programmes and activities of the Ministry of Education for the 2015 fiscal year.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:05 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Yes, Chairman of Committee?
    Question proposed.
    Chairman of Committee (Mr Mathias Asoma Puozaa) 5:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion moved by the Minister for Education, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢6,740,437,383 and in so doing, I would wish to read part of the Report by your Committee -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:05 p.m.
    Hon Chairman, we have developed a new methodology. Since the Official Report captures it, you are not obliged -
    Mr Puozaa 5:05 p.m.
    All right, Mr Speaker.
    Then, Mr Speaker, I may go on with
    the rest of the Report.
    Mr Puozaa 5:05 p.m.
    I mean portions of it.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:05 p.m.
    No! You cannot. I am sorry.
    M r P u o z a a : A l l r i g h t . T h e recommenda-tions then -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:05 p.m.
    No! The recommendations will also be captured by the Official Report. So, just ask that it should be captured by the Official Report and that is it.

    Does the Hansard capture everything as if I read the whole Report or if I read the conclusion, the Hansard will capture the conclusion and recapture the whole Report? How is it captured? Can you help us?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the entirety of the document is captured.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:05 p.m.
    As if I read the whole thing?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:05 p.m.
    As if it has
    been read.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:05 p.m.
    Thank you.
    So, Hon Member, --
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:05 p.m.
    The opening statements will be captured in the Hansard.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:05 p.m.
    Yes.
    Hon Member, generations to come will see that you read the whole Report. So, please, ask for the Hansard to capture it and let us move on.
    Mr Puozaa 5:05 p.m.
    So, do I conclude, Sir?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:05 p.m.
    No conclusion.
    Just ask that you want the Hansard to capture it as if it has been read.
    Mr Puozaa 5:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I present your Committee's Report.
    Introduction
    In accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution, the Hon Minister for Finance, Mr Seth Terkper presented the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of Ghana for the 2015 financial year to the House on Wednesday, 19th November, 2014.
    Pursuant to Orders 140(4) and 186 of the Standing Orders of the House, the Rt Hon Speaker referred the annual budget estimates of the Ministry of Education to the Committee on Education for consideration and report.
    Subsequently, the Committee met with the Hon Minister for Education, Prof Naana Jane Opoku-Agyemang, her two deputies and other officials of the
    Mr Puozaa 5:05 p.m.


    however, include the increasing number of personnel deployed yearly, due to an increase in the number of tertiary institutions, hence lack of accommodation for NSP in the regions and districts, and inadequate staffing and office accom- modation, especially in the newly created districts. The Scheme also lacks adequate means of transport for monitoring and supervision.

    The West African Examinations Council (WAEC)

    A total amount of GH¢42,520,639.00 has been allocated to the Council for its programmes for the year 2015. Out of the allocation, GH¢30,546,159.00 will go to WAEC (National) to cover Compensation, Goods and Services, and Assets.

    The rest of the amount in the sum of GH¢11,974,489.00 will be committed to the payment of Ghana's annual contribution to WAEC (International) as a member of the Council.

    The Council will, in 2015, continue to conduct its usual examinations including the Basic Education Certificate Exami- nation (BECE), West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) and then General and Advanced Business Certificate Examination (May/June).

    In the year 2014, the approved BECE Examination fee was GH¢50.00. Govern- ment subsidised the fee with an amount of GH¢35.00, leaving each candidate with an amount of GH¢15.00 to pay as BECE examination fees.

    The Committee was informed that the approved examination fees for BECE for year 2015 is GH¢58.00 per candidate. Government has undertaken to subsidise the fees with an amount of GH¢40.60 per candidate, and thus, each candidate will be required to pay GH¢17.40.

    The Committee was informed that the late payment of government subsidies for examinations created difficulties in payment for examination materials and services. The Committee hereby urges government to release the BECE subsidies early to enable WAEC procure the relevant materials on time for the conduct of examinations.

    Examination malpractices including community participation in mass cheating; poor commitment on the part of some supervisors and invigilators and the use of mobile phones, remain a challenge to the smooth conduct of examinations.

    Equally disturbing are the threats on the lives of WAEC officers and inspectors deployed to examination centres.

    The Council, as part of measures to address the challenges, will continue to increase public sensitisation to reduce community participation in mass cheating, institute stiffer punishment for mobile phone related irregularities, and employ differential software to detect examination malpractices in multiple choice tests. The Committee urges the Council to be relentless in its drive at stemming examination malpractices.

    Ghana Library Authority (GLA)

    The Authority has been provided a total amount of GH¢6,676,953.00 to execute its programmes for year 2015. This comprises a sum of GH¢5,741,141.00 and GH¢935,812.00 for Compensation and Goods and Services, respectively. No allocation was made for Assets.

    The Authority plans to acquire the relevant books, periodicals, journals and magazines to restock the static and mobile libraries; continue with the Ho, Sunyani

    and Accra library projects and organise promotional activities, such as book clubs, quiz and essay competitions in all the regional libraries.

    The Committee noted that the Authority's collaboration with certain institutions is yielding positive outcomes.

    For instance, as a result of the collaboration between the Volta Regional Library and TECHAIDE, an NGO, that helps children of peasant women farmers in five (5) communities in the Ho Municipality, are being trained in reading, ICT and information retrieval skills to enable them retrieve credible development information on agriculture and share same with their mothers, peers and community members.

    Also, the Western Regional Library, in partnership with MTN, is providing e-library service for its clientele in the Sekondi-Takoradi Metropolis.

    The Committee observed however, that inadequate funding and irregular/ non-release of funds pose a challenge to the work of the Authority. For instance, the Mobile Library Service, which is an important pro-poor outreach programme was seriously affected due to nonrelease of funds.

    Similarly, four regional library projects at various levels of completion have come to a standstill. The Authority also faces a high turnover which is attributed to poor and unattractive conditions of service.

    The Committee considers the role of the Authority as critical to the promotion of literacy in the country and therefore calls

    on the government to give the Authority the needed attention and financial support. Ghana Book Development Council

    (GBDC)

    The Council has been allocated a sum of GH¢475,680.00 to undertake its activities and programmes for year 2015. The allocation will be applied to promote reading clubs in 50 basic schools and creative writing skills in 50 SHS. The Council will also organise regional book fairs, and develop industry standards for publishing and printing.

    The Council is constrained in terms of staffing and logistics, and also lacks the legal framework that will mandate it to undertake certain activities. The Committee was informed that once an Act is passed, the Council could explore the opportunity of generating funds internally to support its operations.

    It is, therefore, important to expedite the process of getting an Act passed to provide legal impetus for the work of the Council.

    Non-Formal Education Division

    (NFED)

    An amount of GH¢35,762,955.00 has been provided the Division for its programmes for year 2015.

    The allocation will be utilised, among others, to organise training for Programme Assistants, develop the capacity of staff, organise community education and awareness creation in selected areas.

    The Committee was informed that the Division is constrained by low funding in the implementation of its activities. It is worth noting that the Division virtually
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:15 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Prof . Dominic Kwaku Fobih (NPP Assin South) 5:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to support the Motion for the approval of GH¢6,740,437,383 for the Ministry of Education, its departments and agencies to enable them to do their work for the year 2015. But in doing so, I would like to make a few comments.
    Mr Speaker, the first comment is about paragraph 7.1 (ii) and with your permis- sion, I beg to quote:
    “Complete the first phase of the community day school project”
    Mr Speaker, my comment is about the calculations and the financial allocation for that policy. I will take that together with paragraph 7.2.1; that is the amount voted for Ghana Education Service (GES) since it is the implementing agency.
    In the Ministry of Education's documents, we find out that they devote GH¢114.00 per day student for an academic year and this, when compared to the number of day students who are likely to benefit from the policy numbered 333,354 - if one divides the GH¢114.00 by 3 per term, we would get GH¢38.00 which means that every single day student is going to pay GH¢38.00 per term, but nowhere in Ghana does a day student pay
    GH¢38.00.
    Mr Speaker, even in response to a Question in Parliament on Thursday, 4th December, 2014, the Hon Minister stated, that day students pay GH¢38.00. But in addition, we have a fixed fee, which covers
    teaching and learning and that is GH¢97.5, which is a constant figure for all day and
    Mr Moses Anim (NPP - Trobu) 5:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I support the Motion, but before then I would also want to make some observations.
    Mr Speaker, I refer to page 132, paragraph 745 of the Budget Statement presented by the Finance Minister. And with your permission, I beg to quote:
    “ F o r 2 0 1 5 , a n a m o u n t o f GH¢7,058.32 million has been allocated for the Education sector.”
    Mr Murtala M. Ibrahim 5:25 p.m.
    On a point
    of order.

    In fact, the inconsistency has been consistent and Mr Speaker, I would urge my Hon Friend to take his time and quote those figures properly because it is confusing, absolutely.
    Mr Anim 5:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I quoted GH¢7,058.32 million, that is at page 132, paragraph 745 of the Budget Statement -- [Interruption]
    Mr Avedzi 5:25 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Member is misleading the House. This is because the Motion moved by the Hon Minister says GH¢6,740,437,383. And if you go to page 171 of the Budget Statement, under Social, you would see Ministry of Education and the amount there is exactly as quoted in the Motion.
    So, there is no difficulty with this Motion at all. The Hon Member should refer to this document and proceed.
    Mr Anim 5:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would just want the Hon Chairman of the Finance Committee to disprove whether page 132, paragraph 475 does not have the figure I quoted.
    Let me continue.
    Mr Speaker, from the Report itself, you would realise that the budgetary allocation for the Ministry of Education is mostly for compensation.
    For this year, compensation alone takes
    72.9 per cent, leaving only 27.1 per cent for Goods and Services and for Assets. It is on record that the asset plan of budget for education has continued to dwindle and as at 2014, it came to 4.1 per cent.
    Mr Simon Osei- Mensah 5:25 p.m.
    On a point of order.
    Mr Speaker, I would want your guidance. The Hon Colleague on his feet quoted page 132, that is paragraph 745 of the Budget Statement.
    Mr Speaker, with your permission, I would want to read the first sentence. “For 2015, an amount of GH¢7,058.32 million has been allocated for the education sector.”
    Mr Speaker, if you go to page 171 as quoted by the Hon Chairman of the Finance Committee, that also reads a different figure. Mr Speaker, which of the two is the correct figure we are working with. This is because we should know the exact amount we are approving for that sector. There are two different things. What we have in the Motion contradicts what we have in paragraph 745 of the Budget Statement. They are not the same thing. So, this inconsistency in the Budget Statement, which one are we picking?
    You come to paragraph 745, you are telling us seven million Ghana cedis, if you go to page 171, you are quoting six point something.
    So, which is the true figure?
    Mr Speaker, we have to get the true figure, so that when we approve it, the whole House would know that this is the figure we are approving. And then they should tell us that what is contained in paragraph 745 is wrong. Then we know that it is wrong. Other than that we have two contradictory figures, which is not right and they are all in the same Budget Statement.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Bagbin 5:25 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker, we have a Motion before us and the Motion is very categorical and specific to an amount. Mr Speaker, the Budget Statement was proposed for our consideration. After debate, we ourselves, in our contribution, drew attention to some areas that needed adjustments, which we have discussed with the Ministry -- areas including that of Parliament.
    Therefore, the figures that would be coming for us now to debate are unlikely to be the same that were in the Budget Statement. So, you would see that difference.
    Even at the Committee level, there were discussions that made the Ministry to come with the specific figure. And so, the Motion, which we are debating, is clearly on the Order Paper and it has stated the amount for which they are requiring parliamentary approval. That is where the focus is and not the initial figure. This is because the initial figures are likely to
    Mr Bagbin 5:25 p.m.


    change, because the process of approval in Parliament involves us to be able to convince the Ministry to change some of the figures, top up some places, and reduce some places. That is why when the figures are coming they are different from what we would propose.

    So, Mr Speaker, we are right and yes, this figure is different from what is in the Budget Statement. But it is different for a good reason, not a bad one.
    Mr Osei-Mensah 5:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I respect my Hon Majority Leader. However, his attempt to remedy the situation is not acceptable. In the same document, without any discussion, if you go to page 171, which the Hon Chairman for the Finance Committee quoted under Social, Ministry of Education, the figure we have there at the end, under total, is GH¢7,640,437,383. When you come to paragraph 745, these figures have not been worked on. So the Hon Majority Leader, maybe, he would have to look at it again and address the situation, because what he said is not the answer.
    Thank you.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
    Hon Member for Trobu, I think you have yielded to the Hon Member. So, he can complete for you.
    Mr Anim 5:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with all due respect, I would want to continue.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
    Then do not give it to anybody again.
    Mr Anim 5:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, thank you very much.
    I was mentioning that a reduction -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
    Deputy
    Minister for Finance?
    Mr Cassiel A. B. Forson 5:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Colleague is grossly misleading this House.
    In referring to paragraph 745 of the Budget Statement, page 132, the Hon Member was trying to reconcile the figures we have in the Motion the Minister moved.
    Clearly, the number we have here which is GH¢7,058.32 million includes the Ghana Education Trust Fund (GETFund). What we are talking about does not include the GETFund. So, Mr Speaker, if he wants to add the GETFund, he should go to other Government obligations.
    Mr Speaker, with your permission, I beg to quote paragraph 745, which reads;
    “ F o r 2 0 1 5 , a n a m o u n t o f GH¢7,058.32 million has been allocated for the education sector.”
    And the emphasis is on the education sector. It goes further to say that;
    “Out of this , an amount of GH¢3,542.47 million, representing 50.2 per cent has been allocated for basic education. These expendi- tures from various sources including the Ghana Education Trust Fund will support the payment of Capitation Grants…”
    Mr Speaker, I repeat, this includes the GETFund and not only that relate to the sector Ministry.
    Thank you.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what the Hon Deputy Minister has said has even worsened the situation. What is the meaning of this construction?
    “ F o r 2 0 1 5 , a n a m o u n t o f GH¢7,058.32 million has been allocated for the education sector. Out of this, an amount…”
    W h i c h a m o u n t ? A m o u n t o f GH¢7,058.32 million.
    “…an amount of GH¢3,542.47 million, representing 50.2 per cent has been allocated for basic education. These expenditures…”
    W h a t a r e t h e e x p e n d i t u r e s ? Expenditures relating to the GH¢7,058.32 million?
    “These expenditures from various sources including the Ghana Education Trust Fund…”
    So all what is meant by that, is that the GETfund feeds into that. That is the meaning of that construction, unless he is importing another meaning into this.
    In any event, when the Budget Statement was delivered, he came to say that there were some inconsistencies in the document. Mr Speaker, if I am out of order, let the Chairman of the Finance Committee come out and I will come back again because I do not see what valuable addition he is going to make.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
    Chairman of the Finance Committee?
    Mr Avedzi 5:35 p.m.
    Thank you very much Mr Speaker.
    The Hon Minority Leader is right by saying that the amount of GH¢7,058.32 includes the amount for GETFund and that is the reason we are approving GH¢6.7 billion for the Ministry of Education.
    The GETFund amount would be approved under Other Government Obligations, which is about GH¢843 million. So, if you add the two, you are close to the GH¢7,058.32 and that is the explanation.
    Mr Kyei -Mensah-Bonsu 5:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is why I said to the Hon Deputy Minister that his own explanation really confused the issue because those
    expenditures include the allocation from the GETFund and his own explanation rather muddied the situation. That is why I was telling him that when they came to withdraw the old one, we thought he was going to rectify this. Now, it is the same thing that has appeared and in his attempt to correct it, he has rather muddied the waters. But I guess we can move on.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Mr Anim 5:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I was saying that a reduction in the asset budget line would also reduce monitoring and supervision. The Report given to us indicated that in 2014, junior high schools (JHS) percentage schools inspected was 65 per cent.
    In 2015, we are expecting to inspect 75 per cent and we all know that inspection is key in terms of determining quality teaching and learning outcomes.
    Let me come to Capitation Grant-- Capitation Grant in 2013 was GH¢25.8 million and that gave us 4.5 per cent per annum per head. In 2015, it is GH¢25.11 million and that is also going to give us 4.5 per cent per annum per head.
    Mr Speaker, we all know that depreciation and inflation have already eroded this amount. What is going to happen is that, we are going to undermine the education of our children of school going age.
    Let me come to the progressive free senior high school (SHS) education. The Ministry of Education estimates, page 17 indicated that -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
    Hon Second Deputy Minority Whip?
    Mr Ignatius Baffour Awuah 5:35 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    The Finance Committee Chairman, in trying to explain the difference between
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
    Hon Member for Trobu?
    Mr Anim 5:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the progressive free SHS education is targeting day students and that is very discriminatory.
    Page 17 -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:35 p.m.
    Hon Member for Trobu, in spite of the interruptions, you should start drawing to a close. Continue but please, be drawing to a close.
    Mr Anim 5:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the free senior high education is targeting or absorbing examination, library, entertainment, Students Representative Council (SRC), science development, sports culture and internet fees. As indicated by the Ministry of Education, it is GH˘114.00 per day student per academic year. We are also told that the 2015/2016 academic year would have an enrolment of 367,565 students.
    M r S p e a k e r , t h a t g i v e s u s GH¢41,902,410.00. Mr Speaker, when you convert it termly, it is GH¢13,967,470.00. Budget allocated GH¢18.1 million to kick start the programme. Mr Speaker, the academic year starts September-December and it is ending this December. So, when we take the GH¢13.9million out of the
    GH¢18.1million, we would be left with GH¢4.2 million.
    My Question is, when is the Finance Minister going to come back for a supplementary budget to top it up? This is because the second term is starting from January to March. So, apart from it being very discriminatory, we should be able to also capture the GH¢114,00 for the boarding students, so that we would bring uniformity. But I think that it is very discriminatory.
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:45 p.m.
    Mohammed Murtala, do you have a point of order?
    Mr M. M. Ibrahim 5:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this is a House of records, you cannot make a blanket statement that ‘UN says'. It is important for us, for the purposes of record, that the Hon Member tells us that, the UN on this or such particular day -- I mean, its source; he cannot make a blanket statement that “UN says.” I can get up and say the UN says this - [Interruption] - So, it is important the Hon Member gives us the accurate and precise information. We would not take this allusion that the “UN- UN.” Give us the source.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:45 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Mr Anim 5:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would just want to make an appeal that our intervention for inclusive education is inadequate. An inclusive education is supposed to create an opportunity for physically challenged children to have school life with students who are not physically challenged. They learn in the same classrooms with them, they fraternise with them and they cooperate with them, so that at the end of the day, stigmatisation would come down.
    Mr Osei-Mensah 5:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in
    fact, this is very serious and we need to look at it. The budget figure that has been allocated to the Ministry of education as contained in the Budget Statement and what they are saying, is that, the Ghana Education Trust Fund (GETFund) allocation is over GH¢800 million. It means, we are going to have an excess of GH¢500 million, which we cannot account for.
    We do not have to approve this now. Please, from their own figures if they add GH¢800 million to their GH¢6.74 million, they are getting over GH¢7.5 million. Where is the GH¢500 million going to?
    Mr Speaker, I beg you, let us clarify these figures. We do not have to just rush and approve it, otherwise, we are going to approve an excess of GH¢500 million, which is not captured in this budget. Seriously, we have to look at it. We have to look at these figures before we approve them, otherwise, we are going to hand out GH¢500 million, which we cannot account for in future.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:45 p.m.
    Hon Member, it is an important point that we will, clarify. Do not worry.
    Hon Member for Trobu, finish and then I will let the Hon Majority Leader - otherwise, constantly -
    Mr Anim 5:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in conclusion, we also have the same problem with out of school children --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:45 p.m.
    Yes, thank you.
    Mr Anim 5:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, let me conclude, I plead with you.
    We have over 500,000 out of school children. The Complemen-tary Basic Education Strategy for 2014, we were able to churn out only 24,107. In 2015, there was no provision to that effect.
    Mr Speaker, in order to reach our target of accessibility and reach the target of educating our children, we need to do more. This is because we all know that there is no country that has developed without education. Based on this, I wish that the Hon Finance Minister, in his supplementary budget, makes more allocation for the Ministry of Education to churn out the quality and the teaching- learning outcomes that we all want.
    Mr Speaker, with these few words, I thank you.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:45 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Hon Majority Leader, do you want to clarify anything?
    Mr Bagbin 5:55 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    I was just trying to emphasise the point that this statement. is a statement of Government proposals -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader, for the records, you said this. What is it?
    Mr Bagbin 5:55 p.m.
    The Budget Statement and
    Mr Bagbin 5:55 p.m.


    the Economic Policy of the Government. It is a Statement.

    Now, the Budget Statement makes proposals anticipating that during the course of the year, we would be able to generate this amount and this is how we are going to distribute that amount.

    Mr Speaker, this House is the custodian of the purse, that is why it is brought here for us to screen and make sure that when we pass the law, the law that is to be implemented, the Appropriation Act, we are able to identify all these things, rectify them and put the actual figures in the Act.

    Mr Speaker, we have the power during this process to get adjustments. Initially, I drew the attention of the Members to some of the areas. And so, at the end of the day, the figures that we capture in the Appropriation Act are the binding figures. They are definitely going to be different from what is in the Budget Statement. So, I say, yes, you can draw our attention to it. But that should not be something that would be used to say that that is why we are approving a wrong figure.

    No! the figure that we would approve is what would be captured in the Appropriation Act and that is what would be binding.

    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
    I will take a comment from the Hon Minority Leader,. If he does not have a comment, I will let someone else -
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe the problem on hand is not that simple. The paragraph that has been read says that, an amount has been allocated to the Ministry of Education and a specific amount out of that, representing a certain percentage has been allocated for basic education.
    Mr Speaker, if that amount is incorrect and it is going to change, the allocation to basic education, commensurably, may have to change. Now, where is it? How do we know the exact amount, for instance,
    that is going to basic education? Mr Speaker, so, it is not that simplistic.

    Mr Speaker, he is asking me whether that is not better - [Interruption.] If he means what he is saying, he said say that into the microphone for record purposes.

    Mr Speaker, now, we find ourselves in

    a very serious situation. The two Deputy Ministers are here. Perhaps, they could cure the mischief that is confronting us - [Interruption.] If he has spoken, it does not mean that he cannot speak again.

    He was nodding profusely to what the Chairman was saying. Now that he sees that he is on a slippery ground, maybe, he can kill the mischief and then we can go on because it is not that simplistic. It affects other allocations to other sectors - [Interruption] -- and he is saying to me, “no”. He should Purge himself if what I am saying is incorrect.
    Mr Avedzi 5:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the path the Hon Minority Leader is choosing is not correct. As explained by the Hon Majority Leader, this is a statement that was made in the budget. What we are going to approve will be captured in the Appropriation Bill and that is going to be the summary of all the estimates that we are approving for all the sectors.
    N o w , w e a r e a p p r o v i n g GH¢6,740,437,383 for the Ministry of Education. We will be approving about GH¢ 843 million for GETFund under other Government Obligations; all these
    will be captured in the Appropriation Bill.
    If you add the GETFund amount to the Ministry of Education's amount, it turns out to be GH¢7.5 billion, which is even better than the GH¢7 billion quoted in the statement.
    So if we have been complaining all the time that the amount allocated for the sectors are not enough and this tends to be more than even what was quoted, what is the beef about that, for us to be complaining?
    In any case, what we are going to approve for the sector will be captured in the Appropriation Bill.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Chairman is asking me, what is the beef about it. The beef, which he does not understand, is that, he has put us in a very tight situation. We do not even know what we are approving now. That is the beef, if he does not understand this simple thing.
    Mr Speaker, he said that it would be done in the Appropriation Bill. Who does not know that? I am suggesting to you now, that you have told us an allocation is going to go to basic education from the GH¢7 billion. Now, by what you are saying to us, what figure is going to basic education?
    Chairman, turn round and listen and respond to that. What figure is going to basic education now? - [Interruption.] You heard me. Do not pretend you did not hear.
    Mr Speaker, that is why I am saying that, it is not that simplistic. Fortunately, the Hon Minister is here and I am asking if it is possible for us to wriggle ourselves out of this. That is the situation.
    This is because, you just cannot say GH¢800 million. That is why I said, he should quote himself because he said to us that if the GH¢800 million is added
    to the allocation - [Interruption] What is that? You are telling us that if we add the figure, it will be GH¢ 7 billion; it turns out to be untrue. What is the farce about that?
    Mr Speaker, he is not adding any value to it. So, I do not think I have to go on.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 5:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, clearly, we are debating Motion number 13. That is what we are being called upon to approve. The amount stated there is very clear. It is
    GH¢6,740,437,383.
    Mr Speaker, we asked a Committee to interrogate what was laid in the House. The Committee has discussed that with the Ministry and the stakeholders and they believe that this is the amount to be properly allocated to the Ministry, and so, we are called to approve this amount. I do not understand why he is saying it not clear.

    I am saying that he should debate it. But the figure he has been called upon to approve is clear. So, when he says the figure is not clear, I do not understand that. This is because, it is stated clearly.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is the reconciliation that we are talking about. And this new position of the Hon Majority Leader - Is he suggesting to this House that any matter that comes from any Committee, should not be debated in the House?
    Some Hon Members 5:55 p.m.
    No!
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 5:55 p.m.
    If that is, no, then why is the Hon Majority Leader saying that the Committee has recommended it and so, nobody should have any question about that? The clarity refers to the reconciliation. That is the matter that I was talking about. The fact that there are attempts to sanitise it, rather introduced greater confusion. That is what I meant by that.
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 5:55 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Member?
    Mr Osei-Mensah 5:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Majority Leader is not getting a better appreciation of the issue we are raising. Mr Speaker, we noted inconsistency in the figures that were quoted in the budget. They are telling us that the difference between what is contained in paragraph 745 and that on page 171 is for GETFund.
    They are also telling us that we are going to approve GH¢840 million for GETFund. But if you add GH¢840 million to the figure quoted in the Motion, it works up to GH¢7,585,437,383, showing a difference of about GH¢500 million.
    If we do approve this figure of GH¢ 6.7 billion, are we going to approve just about GH¢300 million for the GETFund? Because if we approve anything more than GH¢ 317 million, then we are doling out GH¢ 500 million to a place we do not know. I do not think that this House should condone this. We have to clear these figures before we adopt this particular Motion, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker, any approval of this Motion will mean we are giving away over GH¢ 500 million for which we do not know where it is going. That is a very dangerous precedent to be set in this
    particular House. And we have to clear these figures, get the correct ones before we approve this particular Motion.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    Hon Members, the Motion that we are considering is not -
    Can you resume your seat, Hon Member.
    An Hon Member 6:05 p.m.
    Dr Napo!
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    Please, I will not accept that, for you put on your microphone and speak into your microphone. So the person who said “Dr Napo,” I will find you out and I will refer you to the Privileges Committee. It is wrong; do not do that. We are all trying to understand whether -

    Yes, Minority Leader. Then you will refer me to the provision of the Constitution. I am also checking.

    The point is that, the figure that we are approving is less than the figure that is stated in the budget. We are not approving Ghana Education Trust Fund (GETFund) as well. When we come to GETFund, we will cross that bridge, because the figure that is proposed in the budget for Education, as a whole, is seven billion something and the figure that we are approving is six billion something. When the issue was raised, the answer we were given was that, when you add the six

    billion and GETFund, you will come to the figure that is in the budget. When you added those two figures, you said there was an excess of five hundred?
    Some Hon Members 6:05 p.m.
    Yes.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    We are not approving the GETFund figure. The question I asked was that, do we have the power to increase the budget? We are just approving the Education figure. So if you think that the eight hundred for GETFund would increase the total Appropriation made by the President, then we approve this, when we get to the GETFund, then you can raise your various objections. But for so long as this figure is less than the figure, the seven billion, then maybe, we should approve this. When we get the GETFund, we will raise the GETFund's -
    Mr Cassiel A. A. Forson 6:05 p.m.
    Mr
    Speaker, I am trying to first of all, try to clarify what the Hon Member was trying to explain. Mr Speaker, if you look at page 131 of the Budget Statement, the section talks about;
    “Socia l pro tec t ion , pover ty reduction expenditures and progress towards achieving the millennium develop-ment goals”
    Mr Speaker, it followed on to Education and what the Budget Statement seeks to do in paragraph 745 was to report to this House the expenditure that we have projected to spend in the year 2015 towards the education sector.
    Mr Speaker, in doing that, would it project that we are spending an amount of GH¢7,058.32 million?
    Mr Speaker, however, if you add the
    Sector votes, including that of the sector Ministry and that of the Ghana Education Service (GES), the Hon Member is trying
    to say that, yes, we would exceed that by 500 million.
    Mr Speaker, in any case, it is a better position for Government, in the sense that, we are spending more than we said in the budget towards the education sector to ensure that we do more on the Millennium Development Goals.
    Mr Speaker, this does not mean that the Appropriation figure that we have here in the fiscal table would change.
    Mr Speaker, on the fiscal table, the Hon Minister moved the right Motion and on the right Motion, was the amount referring to the sector Ministry.
    Mr Speaker, we would further come as we have done at the Committee to the House, to present the other Government Obligations document to the House of which the GETFund vote would be made available to the House, so that we can reconcile that position.
    In any case, Mr Speaker, I thank you for the opportunity and we have noted the concern as the Hon Member has rightly pointed out to Government.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    On that basis, we can proceed.
    Mr Osei-Mensah 6:05 p.m.
    Sorry, Mr Speaker. The Hon Deputy Minister has admitted that if we approve this figure and approve the figure of over eight hundred million for GETFund, we are going to exceed. - [Interruptions] He said it. The sectorial allocation to Ministry of Education. Do we have the power to exceed as a House? We do not have to reach there; we are reconciling figures.
    Mr Speaker, if it gets to GETFund and it happens that we should approve just a figure a little over three hundred million for GETFund and some of the amount that would be removed are discretionary
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    Thank you very much for your kind direction and thank you also for trying to draw me into the matter “not under me.” But I would not take the bait, Hon Member I am not here to prove anything I am here to just do what I have to do according to the rules.
    I have been looking at the Constitution and the Standing Orders. I can see that the Minority Leader is feverishly looking at it. I can see the Hon Majority Leader to feverishly looking at it. Let me just point us to Order 142 before I say anything;
    “The Estimates of the Expenditure of all public offices and public corporations, other than those set up as commercial ventures,”
    All that area talks about the annual estimates and the Appropriation Act. When you look at the Constitution, article 178 (2) also, it says that;
    “Money shall not be disbursed unless through an Act.”
    So, I get the impression from reading the relevant provisions of the Standing Orders and reading Chapter 13 of the Constitution, the chapter on Finance, that really, at the end of the day, it is the
    Appropriation Act that is the omega of the matter; it is not the Alfa.
    The matter starts with the Hon Minister presenting his financial statement on behalf of the President. When the Hon Minister does that, then we then break up into committees and consider Ministry by Ministry, department by department. After that is done, we come back with our report and report back. The question I asked is that, can we increase it? We cannot increase it; under what article please, Minority Leader? I am not aware that we have increased it before.
    6. 15 p.m.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it has not been done before, to the best of my knowledge. But I think, in the wisdom of Parliament, we could up the levels. Mr Speaker, that is found in article 108.
    “Parliament shall not, unless the bill is introduced or the motion is introduced by, or on behalf of, the President -
    (a) proceed upon a bill including an amendment to a bill, that, in the opinion of the person presiding, makes provision for any of the following -
    (ii)the imposition of a charge on the Consolidated Fund or other public funds of Ghana or the alteration of any such charge otherwise than by reduction; or”
    Mr Speaker, what it means is that, if it is from the President, the alternative could also hold. So, I am saying that, it is possible for Parliament to also do that. If after considering all the sectors, it is deemed appropriate to do that, then Parliament can do that, but we are not there yet.
    Mr Speaker, it should be possible,
    after a consideration of every matter, because the Bill is introduced on behalf of the President to do that. But we are not there yet.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    Hon Members, I do not want to rule on this matter. But based on the principle that the Constitution be read as a whole, when it comes to the Appropriation Bill, I will depart from article 108, and rely on article 179.
    So, I will put the Question -
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, are you giving us a Constitu- tional interpretation or a financial interpretation?
    Mr Avedzi 6:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I think that we have not got to a point where we need to rule on this matter, or even go to the Constitution. Because -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    Let me put the Question.
    I asked a simple question. If you have the answer from the Constitution, then give it to me. And the question I asked is very simple. You, the Chairman of the Finance Committee, said that when we add two figures, we would come to a certain figure. But when they added the two figures, there was an excess of GH¢
    500, 000.
    My view is that, we have not come to the Ghana Education Trust Fund (GETFund) figure yet. So, for long as the Ministry of Education's figure is lower than the 7 billion, I am prepared to put the Question.
    Of course, the Hon Member has raised very interesting issues; he says that we cannot go above the GH¢7 billion. So if we pass this, what it would mean is that, the GETFund figure, we can only pass about GH¢ 300 million, and that is what he is
    saying. We have not got to the GETFund figure yet.
    So, do you want to correct -
    All right. Chairman of the Finance Committee?
    Mr Avedzi 6:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we have all the figures in the budget document, and that is what I would want to show to Hon Members.
    If you go to page 171, the table is very clear, that the amount being proposed for the Ministry of Health, under social, is GH¢6, 740,437,383. That is for the Ministry of Education.
    If you go to page 175, the amount being proposed for the GETFund is also being captured there, which is part of Other Government Obligations.
    Page 175, for GETFund is GH¢ 843,899,218. Mr Speaker, what it means is that, the budget in the Appropriation Bill is going to introduce a figure for GETFund of GH¢ 843 million,and then also introduce a figure for Ministry of Education of GH¢6.7 billion. Put the two together, and it would agree to 7.5 billion, that the Hon Member is referring to. In that case, we are not exceeding or increasing the figure.
    The only thing that the Leader has alluded to early on is that, the write-up mentioned GH¢7.058 billion, but in the actual table, the amount is GH¢7.5billion, which the leader has acknowledged early on.
    So, if we approve it, it does not mean that we are approving the write up. But what is most important for us to approve in this Budget Statement are the tables that are brought in the Appropriation Bill, and that is going to capture the 6.7 for the Ministry of Education, and 643 for the GETFund. So, in that case, we would exceed any figure, and for that matter, the interpretation of the Constitution does not come in here.
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Member?
    Mr Osei Mensah 6:05 p.m.
    Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
    It is quite interesting, very interesting. Mr Speaker, paragraph 745 is clear. You are saying that the amount there is GH¢7.058. And if you -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, let me just ask you a question.
    I will want to help you to address what he said, and also to see whether you understood it. What the Chairman of the Finance Committee is saying is that, there can be a figure in the write-up, and that figure can even be wrong. But it is from the tables that we generate these figures for different committees. So, please, add the one on the tables, and see whether it adds up to the figure. If it adds up to the figure, then maybe, it means the write-up is wrong.
    Mr Osei-Mensah 6:05 p.m.
    Thank you very much Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker, if they do admit in this House that in paragraph 745 of the Budget Statement, the quoted figure of GH¢7,058.32 is wrong, then we can move ahead, and adopt those we have in the tables, which would add up to GH¢ 7.58 plus, which means that we are having excess of GH¢ 500 million over what was previously indicated as allocation for that sector.
    Mr Speaker, assuming we add this GH¢ 500 million, and the figure exceeds the total figure we approve for the appro- priation, what happens?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    Thank you very much, Hon Member.
    What we would do is that, and I will not take any more discussions; all your concerns have been noted; the possibility of trouble in the near future or the distant
    future has also been noted.
    I think that the Minister for Education is here. So, are the two Ministers from the Ministry of Finance -- the Chairman of the Finance Committee is also here. So, is the illustrious Majority Leader. They have all taken note of the various concerns you have raised.
    Thank you very much for your concerns.
    I will not rule, but I will put the Question.
    Hon Atta Akyea, let me just ask you. You remember the Supreme Court case involving one Brown of the Audit Service? Do you remember the case? The Supreme Court made the point that even with some of these independent bodies, Parliament cannot increase the amount. I am not sure about the decision.
    I have not seen anything in the Constitution, which convinces me that a President can bring a budget, and Parliament can increase the figure. So, if the figure is higher - I do not know. But I am not in the position now to rule, I must admit. So, I will take this - [Interruption] - No! I will not stand it down.
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Asiamah?
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 6:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, there seems to be total confusion over this issue. So, let us stand it down, so that we would continue tomorrow. After all, where are we rushing to? Where are we rushing to? - [Interruption.]
    If there is confusion, you need to go and consult. Mr Speaker, there is total confusion. So, we need to take our time, so that we consult -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:05 p.m.
    Hon Asiamah, thank you.
    Hon Atta Akyea?
    Mr Samuel Atta Akyea 6:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with due respect, from what I am hearing from your end, it seems to me that you want to ignore some very important issues because of lack of clarity.
    From my perspective, because it is a very serious exercise and there is some confusion here and there, Mr Speaker, you would not want to give your blessings to all the concerns and the confusions here.
    So, with respect, if this is deferred, and the serious issues are considered by both sides, and then later on, if they come to a convergence, say that we should paper off the confusion, and then you put the Question, it could be a serious matter that the Speaker was in the midst of confusion, but then proceeded to put the Question.
    Questions are put when there is clarity. I have not heard that we had so much confusion and nevertheless, Mr Speaker said he wanted to put the Question.
    So, I crave your indulgence that this is deferred for some time tomorrow; let Leadership and those who have spoken, input the issues properly. And then when we have clarity over the matter, the Question will be put. It will not hurt a fly.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Hon Members, Order!
    I do not know whether anyone is confused because I am not. I am clear in my mind.
    Hon Majority Leader, speak -- But we want to give everybody -
    Mr Bagbin 6:25 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Clearly, there is no confusion on this
    issue. The only request to my Good Friend is that, he wants it to be categorically admitted that the figure in paragraph 745 of the Budget Statement is wrong. Clearly, the Hon Deputy Minister for Finance admitted that.
    In the statement I made, I said that this is only a statement and the errors in the statement will be rectified by us and the figures will be put in the Appropriation Bill - [Hear! Hear!] - and we admitted. So, there is no confusion in the budget.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    Hon Members, before - [Interruption]- I put the Question, I will give an opinion. So, as I listen to you, I am writing my opinion. Also, I may ask a few Hon Members to clarify a few things to me. I will give a ruling.
    Yes, Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, it is good that - I guess we are now getting on the same playing field. But I would like to draw the attention of the Hon Deputy Minister for Finance, now that we are talking about tables, to page 176. The same figure is also quoted in the tables there.
    If you compare with the expenditure in 2014, Mr Speaker, it reflects the expenditure of the allocation to education in 2014. So, that is where the trouble is.
    For 2014 and 2013, the table there captures what is contained in the 2013, 2014 and also the 2015 budgets. So, let us admit that maybe, there is a mistake and then we see how to move forward with that. Otherwise, nobody can see that the GETFund will take care of it, and that it will be more than that and it is better for us. It is totally wrong. So, let us see how to sanitise it and move on.
    Mr Forson 6:25 p.m.
    Thank you Mr Speaker.
    Mr Forson 6:25 p.m.


    I wish to thank the Hon Minority Leader for bringing to our attention the table on page 176, on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    Order! Order!
    Mr Forson 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the Hon Minister for Finance projected total appropriations of GH¢ 41,422 million. I wish to confirm to this House that even though we have made that mistake, we are not exceeding this proposed appropriation of GH¢41,422 million. -- [Pause.]
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I asked him to look at the grand total, which reflects in the Appropriation Bill. He talked about the GH¢ 41,422 million in paragraph 150. But in the table there, they used GH¢44 million. We need to be careful.
    Mr Forson 6:25 p.m.
    Thank you Mr Speaker.
    I am trying to reconcile that. But I believe for the Appropriation Bill, we are not exceeding that as we have done that with the Finance Committee. So, we will work with the Committee and have that resolved.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 6:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that was why I said that we should be clear because our attention was drawn to what obtains on the tables. If we look at it, everything now has been set out, and the total request will come to GH¢44 million and no longer GH¢ 41,422 million. We will leave it to the Finance Ministry to
    do that reconciliation. Otherwise, it is something serious.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:25 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader? [Pause.]
    Hon Majority Leader, we have been told that the figure in the table is different from the one in the write-up. Both were presented to us as a statement by the President. And so, once we are working within the bigger figure, I do not have a problem with that. If we were working outside the figures -- if what we were adding was in excess of the figures, which I have not found, then I have a problem with that.
    We have also been told about the problems that the approval will have on the GETFund approval.
    Hon Majority Leader, in your view, can it have any effect? If we approve this, does it mean that the GETFund figure has to be reduced downwards? That is what is being suggested. Or it does not make any difference?
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I still stand by my earlier statement, that what we have here are proposals from the Executive. And so, we are not bound to follow these proposals. We are not bound.
    Mr Speaker, that was why we referred to the committees to discuss with the sector Ministers and their technical directors.
    During the course of the discussion, the Committee would by all means finally agree with them the figure that we should approve, which would be captured in the Appropriation Act, and that is when it becomes binding.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    I agree with you to some extent, but there is a
    point in which I depart from you. This is because by saying that they are not bound, are you suggesting that when a President brings his proposal of, say, GH¢ 1 million as the total budget, we can go out into committees - every committee has been complaining that the appropriation to the Committee should have been bigger.
    Does it mean that at committee level,
    we can increase the appropriation to every Ministry, and then come back here with GH¢ 5 million? We cannot.
    So, we are bound to the extent that we cannot increase it. That is my view. It may be a consecutive view; unless you are saying that we can increase it. When it goes to the Committee, this document -- the document that you hold is a mere guide -- A reference -- We can go to the Committee and say, for example, that the Attorney-General was given GH¢1 million; they should give the Attorney- General GH ¢5 million. Can we do that?
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this is a Motion coming from the President, and so, there is nothing preventing us from increasing it.
    Mr Speaker, we, in this House, impose taxes. What they do is to collect what we have ordered them to collect. That is why we are the custodians of the purse. We have that power; it is Parliament, and so, Mr Speaker, there is no law saying that we cannot increase it.
    As at today, the provision that they are making for Parliament, we are insisting that it is insufficient, and we are pushing it up. This is because we believe that with the taxation that we have imposed, they could generate more than what they are saying and what they allocated to us.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    But Hon
    Majority Leader, we are not pushing it up suo moto; we are not pushing it up on our own accord. We are administratively - you, as Leadership, you are impressing it upon the Executive that what they have provided is inadequate.
    We did not come and sit down here and increased our allocation to Parliament. We cannot do that, unless - In fact, I would be very glad if you could - I am sure if we accept that position today, all Hon Members in the House would wear white tomorrow. This is because I have heard Hon Members get up and say “ The allocation to this Ministry is too small, it is inadequate”. That has been the story the whole day.
    I am sure that the Hon Ranking Member on Food and Agriculture would be very happy if we increase the budget for Food and Agriculture.
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, you are referring to the process, but I am talking about the decision. So, we can increase it.
    We are equal arms; we try to cooperate, and that is why the process is such that there should be consultation, and so, we are consulting them. But this is what we know, and we have been declaring it here, and sometimes we say GH¢7 million is for this office, and they spent GH¢48 million.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    We describe that as over-expenditure.
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we think that that is a breach, a breach of our decision.
    And that is why clearly, I believe that we have the authority to increase; we have that. It is just that because of consultation, and sometimes they draw our attention to the challenges, then we give in. But that power, we have it.
    - 6:35 p.m.

    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, when we go to the same article 106, clauses (11), (12) and (13), we would see that that final authority is in us.
    The President can disagree with us, and send it back to us, insisting that what he submitted, we should go by it. We can disagree with the President, and when we send it back to him, he is bound to assent to it. It is there.
    So, the power is in us. The President can disagree when we send it back to him for his assent, that “no, I disagree for one or two reasons”, and send it back for us to consider his reasons. We can disagree with the President and say we insist that our position is the right thing. Send it back to the President, and the President, by the Constitution, is compelled to assent to it.
    So, we have the final authority.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader, the position you are advancing - the position that you are arguing -- that the Constitution outlines, in terms of the power of Parliament, is a very interesting position.
    I must say that it is a position that would find favour with me if it is the correct position. I am not in the position just now, because there are a few decisions - there is a decision of the Supreme Court, that -- I think it was a case involving one Brown -- Attorney-General v. Brown , which dealt with the Audit Service, the Auditor-General and the Audit Service, and whether Parliament can increase the budget. I do not have the judgment with me. I have a few Law Reports, but I remember the Supreme Court gave a very interesting ruling.
    So, I think that I do not find my way clear at this juncture. As far as this is concerned, at a certain point, I was ready to put the Question. But the more we delved into the constitutional arguments, the more - No! There was no confusion, but the more questions were raised, questions that demand answers.
    Do we have another Motion to consider?
    Hon Majority Leader, do we have another
    Motion to consider while we -
    Yes, let us continue. We will defer this for the time being. Let us continue. We will come back to it today -- just now. Let us take another Motion while we all look at the Constitution.
    6. 45 p.m.
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, since we would come back to this item today and your pleasure is for us to move to another item, we would take item number 21.
  • [Resumption of debate from Column 4667]
  • Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    Item number 21, Minister for Finance?
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your kind permission, I am seeking permission for the Hon Deputy Minister -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    I recognise him.
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Thank you very much.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    Item number 21, Minister for Finance.
    BILLS - SECOND READING 6:35 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Mr James K. Avedzi) 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to support the Motion and in doing so, I present your Committee's Report.
    Mr Speaker,
    Introduction
    The Customs and Excise (Petroleum Taxes and Petroleum Related Levies) (Amendment) Bill, 2014 was presented to Parliament by the Hon Minister for Finance and read for the First time on Wednesday, 19th November, 2014 and referred to the Finance Committee for consideration and report in accordance with article 174 (1) of the 1992 Constitution and Order 169 of the Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
    The Committee was also to determine whether the Bill is of an urgent nature to be taken through all the stages in one day in accordance with article 106 (13) of the Constitution and Order 119 of the Standing Orders of the House.
    Pursuant to the referral, the Committee met with the Hon Deputy Minister for Finance, Mr Casiel Ato Baah Forson, officials of the Ministry of Finance and the Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA), and considered the referral.
    The Committee is grateful to the Hon Deputy Minister and officials of the Ministry and GRA for attending upon it.
    Reference
    The Committee referred to the following documents at its deliberations:
    1. The 1992 Constitution of Ghana.
    2. The Standing Orders of the Parliament of Ghana.
    3. The Customs and Excise (Petroleum Taxes and Petroleum Related Levies) Act, 2005 (Act
    685)
    Background
    Mr Kwaku Agyeman Kwarteng (Obuasi West) 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to support the Motion and in doing so, I would like to point out that the taxes and the margins we would be setting by approving this have been determined to address specific problems. It is important that not only do we comply with the levy margins we ourselves set, but that we comply with the petroleum pricing formula as a whole.
    Mr Speaker, while supporting this Motion, we would like to take this opportunity once again, to draw the Government and the National Petroleum Authority's attention to the fact that the level of fuel prices in the country now offend the National Petroleum Authority, Act. While we do this, we should be paying attention to that as well.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we would now take the procedural Motion at item number 22.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    Minister for Finance?
    MOTIONS 6:35 p.m.

    Mr Forson 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 128 (1) which require that when a Bill has been read a Second time it shall pass through a Consideration Stage, which shall not be taken until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed, the con-sideration Stage of the Customs and Excise (Petroleum Taxes and Petroleum Related Levies) (Amendment) Bill, 2014 may be taken today.
    Mr Avedzi 6:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    Yes,
    Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 6:35 p.m.
    Item number 23.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:35 p.m.
    Hon Members, item number 23.
    BILLS -- CONSIDERATION 6:55 p.m.

    STAGE 6:55 p.m.

    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    This Bill is just one clause. So, the clause.
    Clause - First Schedule to Act 685 amended.
    Mr Avedzi 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, the clause, item number 7, delete “2.945” and insert “0.2945”
    Mr Speaker, the rate is GH¢ 0.2945 per litre but not GH¢ 2.945 per litre.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    So, you are moving an amendment to the clause?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    This brings us to the end of the Consideration Stage.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the
    procedural Motion, item number 24.
    MOTION 6:55 p.m.

    Mr Forson 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 131(1) which require that when a Bill has passed through the Consideration Stage, the Third Reading thereof shall not be taken until at least, twenty-four hours have elapsed, the Motion for the Third Reading of the Customs and Excise (Petroleum Taxes and Petroleum Related Levies) (Amendment) Bill, 2014 may be moved today.
    Mr Avedzi 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Bagbin 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we can now take item number 25.
    BILLS - THIRD READING 6:55 p.m.

    Mr Bagbin 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we now move to item 29 on page 25 of the Order Paper.
    MOTIONS 6:55 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80(1) which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited relating to a 360MW Combined Cycle Dual Fuel Power Plant Facility at Aboadze may be moved today.
    Mr Robert N. D. Mosore 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Bagbin 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we can now take the substantive Motion numbered item 30 on the Order Paper.
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    Hon Asiamah, is there a problem?
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 6:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I
    would want to raise this very important issue.
    I am happy today we have all approved of the nomination of Hon Dr Kwabena Donkor, our former Hon Chairman.
    Mr Speaker, this House has approved of his nomination as an Hon Minister - [Interruption] - I am talking about best parliamentary practice.
    Mr Speaker, at least, an Hon Member of the Committee should have done this work for us, so that we would have been assured of these checks and balances. But for him to have gone through this process, and for him again to have read as an Hon Chairman of the Committee, is quite unhealthy for our practice here. [Interruption] It is about the practice; that is what I am saying.
    Constitutionally, it is right but it is about the practice. It is unhealthy for our democratic practice, that we have an Hon Member who has been approved by this House as an Hon Minister and will be joining the Executive and he goes ahead to act as Hon Chairman of a committee - that is my concern.
    Par l iament should be seen to be Parliament, having checks on the Executive. So, at least, the Vice Chairman or a member of the Committee on our side should have done this work, so that we can have a healthy practice. It is about practices and this is very unhealthy for our democratic culture. That is the point.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    Thank you, Hon Member, for your observations.
    But I am sure you are also aware of article 80 of the Constitution, which states that:
    “A Minister of State or Deputy Minister shall not enter upon the duties of his office unless he has taken and subscribed the oath of
    allegiance, the oath of Minister of State and the Cabinet oath, as the case may be, set out in the Second Schedule to this Constitution.”
    And you should also know that the antecedent, since the Second Republic, that people have been approved by Parliament and then subsequently, they have never been sworn in.
    There are people who were nominated by the President and approved by Parliament but between the approval and the swearing-in, the Executive changed its mind. So, we can only pray for him and say that in the meantime, he should continue with his parliamentary duties. At least, that one, he is assured of it. A bird in hand is better than two in the bush.
    Hon Chairman, continue.
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 6:55 p.m.
    As a Parliament, we should develop certain conventions and practices. I think my concern should have been taken in good faith, so that we would move along. This is because I do not think it is the best practice. After all, we have the Hon Vice Chairman there; we have Hon Members of the Committee there who can equally do this job.
    Therefore, I do not think this is the best practice for our democracy. We should be able to develop and have conventions and practices, so that even though he has not been sworn in, the intention is clear - he is joining the Executive in no time.
    As we speak now, he can be sworn in because this House has done its job. So, it is based on that I say Parliament, we are growing our democracy. So, when such concerns are raised, we should take them in good faith and move along. That is the concern I have raised.
    Now, as we speak, the President can
    call him and swear him in. So, the Hon Vice Chairman is here, he can easily move
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 6:55 p.m.


    the Motion; the other Hon Members of the Committee are here.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 6:55 p.m.
    Hon Asiamah, I take your point with a lot of good faith. I know you said it with the best of intentions. In fact, you said it in a prophetic way, because even though he has not been sworn in, you know that by all means he would be sworn in. So on that basis, I take your advice.
    Hon Asiamah, you will forgive us if for this one time we do not take your advice.
    Chairman of the Committee?
    MOTIONS 7:05 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited relating to a 360MW Combined Cycle Dual Fuel Power Plant Facility at Aboadze.
    Mr Speaker, in so doing, I present the Report of your Committee.
    Introduction
    On Thursday, 27th November, 2014, the Hon. Minister for Energy and Petroleum, Mr Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah, laid before Parliament for consideration and approval, Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited, relating to a 360MW Combined Cycle
    Dual Fuel Power Plant Facility at Aboadze and the Energy Conversion Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana, JEL Oil and Gas Ghana Limited and Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited, relating to a 360MW Combined Cycle Dual Fuel Power plant facility at Aboadze.
    Following this, the Agreements were referred to the Select Committee on Mines and Energy for consideration and report, pursuant to Order 188 of the Standing Orders of Parliament.
    Deliberations
    The Committee met with the Hon Minister for Energy and Petroleum, Hon Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah and officials of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum to consider the Power Agreements.
    The Commit tee expresses i t s appreciation to the officials for their attendance and for offering clarifications on issues raised at the meeting.
    Reference Documents
    The Committee referred to the under- listed documents during its deliberations:
    i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.
    ii. T h e S t a n d i n g O r d e r s o f Parliament.
    iii. The Public Utilities Regulatory Commission Act, 1997 (Act
    538).
    iv. The Energy Commission Act, 1997 (Act 541).
    v. The Environmental Protection Agency Act, 1994 (Act 490).
    vi. The Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 1999
    (L.I. 1652).
    vii. O t h e r C o n n e c t e d Documents relating to the Power Purchase Agreement including the Government Consent and Support Agreement, the Engineering, Procurement and Construction Contract and the Joint Services Agreement.
    Background Information
    Ghana's electricity consumption has seen sharp increase over the past decade. In 2013, Ghana's total peak demand was about 1,943MW. According to Ghana's Generation Master Plan, forecast peak demand for 2014 is around 2,200MW.
    The implication is that by 2015, electricity demand will outstrip the available power from the current installed generation capacity of about 2,850MW.
    To improve the country's generation capacity to meet the increasing demand for electricity, the Government continues to adopt various measures to address the power deficit.
    Currently, the Government has set a target to achieve a generation capacity of 5,000MW by 2016 to meet the projected energy demand and a reserve margin of about 20 per cent. The Government intends to achieve this principally through partnership with the Independent Power Producers (IPPs).
    In line with this policy, the Electricity Company of Ghana executed a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) with Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited (Jacobsen) in December, 2012, under which Jacobsen has agreed to supply ECG with 360MW of electrical power and energy over a period of twenty-five (25) years.
    In addition to the PPA, the ECG executed the fuel supply component of the PPA under a Conversion Agreement
    with a sister company of Jacobsen, Jelco Oil and Gas Ghana Limited.
    Under the Agreement, Jelco will manage, administer and supply fuel to the plant on behalf of Jacobsen.
    For the purpose of securing legal backing to these Agreements, the approval of Parliament, the Power Agreements were laid in Parliament by the Hon. Minister for Energy and Petroleum on Thursday, 27th November, 2014 for their consideration.
    Parties to the power purchase Agreement
    The parties to the power purchase Agreement are the Electricity Company of Ghana Limited (ECG) and Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited. The Electricity Company of Ghana Limited
    The ECG is a wholly owned electricity distribution company incorporated under the Companies Act, 1963 (Act 179).
    The ECG is permitted under applicable laws and Regulations in Ghana to purchase electrical energy.
    Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited
    Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited (Jacobsen) is a Special Project Company incorporated in Ghana on November 23, 2011, to develop the 360MW Combined Cycle Dual Fuel Power Plant Facility at Aboadze. The Company was awarded a Power Generation License in 2012 by the Energy Commission, after it had completed the requisite activities. Jacobsen is a fully owned subsidiary of Jacobsen Electro AS, a company duly incorporated under the laws of Norway.
    Jacobsen is permitted under applicable laws and Regulations in Ghana to sell independently produced electrical energy.
    Description of the project
    The project involves the development, ownership, operation and management
    Mr Robert N. D. Mosore 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion for the PPA. But in doing so, I would like to say that, I sympathise with the good people of Ghana for their patience and absorption of the dumsor dumsor, to wit “load shedding” effect. We hope that this kind of Agreement may within the shortest possible time send us out of the dumsor dumsor. This is something I hope for.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Question proposed.
    Minister for Energy and Petroleum (Mr Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah) 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, as has been noted, I would want to thank the Committee for the diligent work.
    The structure of this Agreement was that, there is a mixture of equity and shareholder loan of 15 per cent and a debt of 85 per cent. This structure was possible with the separation of fuel supply component for the signed PPA, and the arrangement of the Convention Agreement. This has made it possible to really bring the tariffs reasonably down, compared with other Agreements that we have just negotiated.
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    Do you have a point of order?
    Mr Annoh-Dompreh 7:05 p.m.
    Yes.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    What is your point of order?
    Mr Annoh-Dompreh 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I am respectfully seeking your clearance, because you gave the chance to the Hon Member to contribute to the Motion and the Hon Minister also got up. I do not know if he is rising on a point of order or a point of information.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Mr Buah 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, this project is very good; it is going to give us 360 MW of power and I would urge Hon Members to approve the Motion, so that we can quickly start the project and be able to increase our generation capacity.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    Hon Minority Leader?
    Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu (NPP - Suame) 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to also add my voice to supporting the approval of this Agreement.
    Mr Speaker, I believe that, going forward, it should be at the discretion of the Hon Minister in respect of the approval of PPA. To the extent that they are international business or economic transaction to which the Government, by some arrangement, is a party; it should come to Parliament and be approved by Parliament. It is true that we have not been doing that but going forward, that should be the practice.
    From now on, Mr Speaker, this should provide us with a very useful beginning to engage the Ministers whose sectors would
    Mr Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu (NPP - Suame) 7:05 p.m.


    be undertaking such enterprise and every time when such Agreements are entered into by departments or agencies under the various sectors, they should come to Parliament for approval. To the extent that ultimately, the exposure should be on Government and the State; it should come to Parliament for approval.

    Mr Speaker, I thank you very much.

    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Mr Bagbin 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we may now take the Resolution numbered 31.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:05 p.m.
    Minister for Finance, Resolution, item number 31 on page 25?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, while the Hon Minister is struggling to find the Resolution in situate, I would want to remind him because he is a member of this House - that before moving for the adoption of the Resolution, he should know the accompaniments -- the relevant numbers that should support the Resolution. I believe he knows that.
    RESOLUTIONS 7:15 p.m.

    Minister for Finance) 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move,
    WHEREAS by the provisions of article 181(5) of the Constitution
    the terms and conditions of any international business or economic transaction to which the Govern- ment of Ghana is a party shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by Parliament by a Resolution supported by the votes of a majority of all Members of Parliament;
    PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181(5) of the Constitution, and at the request of the Government of Ghana acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions of a Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited relating to a 360MW Combined Cycle Dual Fuel Power Plant Facility at Aboadze.
    THIS HONOURABLE HOUSE 7:15 p.m.

    H E R E B Y R E S O LV E A S 7:15 p.m.

    Dr Kwabena Donkor 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I
    beg to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your permission, we would now take Motion number 32.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Chairman of Committee?
    MOTIONS 7:15 p.m.

    Chairman of Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80(1) which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Energy Conversion Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana, Jel Oil and Gas Ghana Limited and Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited relating to a 360MW Combined Cycle Dual Fuel Power Plant Facility at Aboadze may be moved today.
    Mr Joseph Cudjoe 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg
    to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    This morning, I heard the Speaker saying that we are going to sit till 12 midnight and
    Hon Members agreed.
    Some Hon Members 7:15 p.m.
    Where is the Speaker?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    The Speaker is sitting in the Chair. [Laughter.]
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we would now take, with your kind permission, item 33.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Yes, Chairman of Committee?
    Energy Conversion Agreement among Electricity Company of Ghana,
    Jel Oil and Gas Ghana Limited and Jacobsen Jelco GhanaLimited
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Energy Conversion Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana, Jel Oil and Gas Ghana Limited and Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited relating to a 360MW Combined Cycle Dual Fuel Power Plant Facility at Aboadze --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    The
    Committee does not have a Report?
    Present the Report in extenso. Put on your microphone and read it out; we want you to spend some time.
    Dr Donkor 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in so doing, I would want to present your Committee's Report.
    The Committee combined the two Reports since they were essentially one and that is why you have the same conclusion as in the earlier one.
    Introduction
    On Thursday, 27th November, 2014, the Hon Minister for Energy and Petroleum, Mr Emmanuel Kofi Armah-Buah laid
    SPACE FOR TABLE 7:15 p.m.

    Mr Robert N. D. Mosore 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    You can speak to it.
    Mr Mosore 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I just want
    to second.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Hon Minister?
    Question proposed.
    Minister for Energy (Mr Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah) 7:15 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker.
    I rise to support the Motion and to thank the Committee.
    This project is expected to give us about 190 megawatts to 240 megawatts of power.
    In supporting the Motion, I would want to note again that, we are now discussing the
    PPA and it is important to stress that we have thought a lot about the need to fasten some of these negotiations to make sure that the generations that we need can come in quickly. This Agreement has been negotiated between Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG) and Amandi, Transmission Agreement between GRIDCo and Amandi, Environmental Agreement with Environ-mental Protection Agency (EPA).
    Mr Speaker, if bringing the PPA to the House will bring transparency, it is alright but
    I believe that it is important that we do things to make sure we can fasten some of these projects.
    Having said this, I would urge Hon
    Members to support the Motion.
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Do you have a point of order?
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 7:15 p.m.
    A little clarification. He used the word “fasten”. I do not understand the word “fasten”. Is it “fasten” a seat belt or what because he kept mentioning it. So, I wanted a clarification on the meaning of “fasten”.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    I will
    put the Question.
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we want him to clarify that word. We do not understand.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Thank you.
    Hon Asiamah, can I put the Question? I am asking your permission to put the Question.
    I can put the Question? So, now, you understand “fasten”?
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker. We proceed to item number 34, which is Resolution.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Item 34. Hon Minister for Finance?
    RESOLUTIONS 7:15 p.m.

    Minister for Finance) 7:15 p.m.
    Thank you Mr Speaker.
    I beg to move, that,
    WHEREAS by the provisions of Article 181(5) of the Constitution the terms and conditions of any international business or economic transaction to which the Govern- ment of Ghana is a party shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by Parliament by a Resolution supported by the votes of a majority of all Members of Parliament;
    PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181(5) of the Constitution, and at the request of the Government of Ghana acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions of an Energy Con-version Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana, Jel Oil and Gas
    Ghana Limited and Jacobsen Jelco Ghana Limited relating to a 360MW Combined Cycle Dual Fuel Power Plant Facility at Aboadze.
    THIS HONOURABLE HOUSE 7:15 p.m.

    H E R E B Y R E S O LV E A S 7:15 p.m.

    Dr Kwabena Donkor 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 7:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we stood down the decision on the Motion on the estimates of the Ministry of Education. The Hon Minister has since been with us and she is due to travel today and we just wanted to know whether we could take the decision now and proceed to the other items.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.
    Thank you.
    If the Hon Minister is due to travel, she can travel. This is because the practice has developed that we allow the Hon Deputy Ministers to move these matters.
    I just want to draw your attention to the
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:15 p.m.


    fact that I have found the judgment. It is Brown and Attorney General (the Audit Service case) - 2010 Supreme Court of Ghana Report. That is what I have been trying to read to arrive at a decision. So, the Hon Minister can travel. I will not take the “Education” now.

    We wish the Hon Minister a safe flight.

    Hon Asiamah, I see the Hon Minister

    here all the time. I see her here all the time.

    In fact, sometimes I see her more than you. [Laughter].

    Hon Minister for Finance, I hope you are not leaving us?

    Can I ask you a question, please?

    When you present the budget on behalf of the President, can Parliament increase the budget, in your view?

    The total figure, I mean.
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 7:25 p.m.

  • [Resumption of debate from column 4619]
  • Minister for Finance (Mr Seth E. Terkper) 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I believe -- and I am being very cautious here, just as it may not be - for the same reason that Private Member's Bill, for example, cannot increase the allocation or decrease it, I believe that -
    I recall last year when we had to make an adjustment with respect to Judicial
    Service, there was consultation between the Executive and Parliament in the process before the adjustment was made.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    I hope
    the protagonists of the issue are listening. We have the benefit of the Minister for Finance.
    Mr Terkper 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, at paragraph 578 of the Budget Statement, where we reported on the sectors and with your permission, I beg to quote:
    “For the implementation of the above programmes and activities, an amount of GH¢ 6,740,437,383.00 has been allocated...”
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    Go on; I am listening.
    Mr Terkper 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, so, we have reported on the departmental ones and it is consistent with the table on Appendix 4B at page 170 of the Budget Statement, which section is consisting details of the expenditures on the various Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) and Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies (MMDAs) covered under the -
    When you move or fast forward to the issue under consideration, which is paragraph 132, under that we report for social intervention programmes, which in some cases, are from sectors that may not be under the Ministry of Education.
    Mr Speaker, a good example would be the School Feeding Programme, which is a social intervention programme, which though, not listed here, would definitely be in respect of education. This is because it comes under the District Assemblies Common Fund (DACF), which would definitely be an intervention.
    Mr Speaker, similarly, there are activities of various non-governmental organisations (NGOs), which also fall under social interventions with respect to education. Therefore, it is conceivable that in reporting under social interventions, you would have a figure that is higher than what has been allocated to the sector Ministry.
    What we report here is section 6. Section 5 deals with the MDAs and their allocations; section 6 is on the consolidation of social intervention programmes, which are not necessarily under the budget for the sector Ministry. This is because we are talking about social protection, poverty reduction, expenditure and progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).
    Mr Speaker, from last year, we have been putting together the social intervention programmes. This is because we strongly believe our social intervention programmes have gone beyond, in particular the subsidy that we pay for petroleum and utilities, and we have been endeavouring to show this.
    So, Mr Speaker, what is seen as the inconsistency, is as a result of a consolidation which is not necessarily covered under the Ministry of Education. Strictly speaking, in appropriation terms, we must not go to section 6 but to section 5 of the Budget Statement because it is section 5 which gives details of the
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Member?
    Mr Osei-Mensah 7:25 p.m.
    Thank you very
    much Mr Speaker.
    Mr Speaker, I would like to refer the
    Hon Minister for Finance to the same page 171, appendix 5A or 4B of the Budget Statement; they are all the same the figure he quoted. He should refer to Appendix 7 of the Budget Statement under the Ministry of Education, the figure for 2015; Gh¢ 7,058,320,457. Mr Speaker, how does he reconcile these two figures in the two appendices?
    Could he give us the breakdown of
    the sources of funding for the Ghana Education Trust Fund (GETFund), so that we reconcile?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    The Hon Minister for Finance?
    Mr Terkper 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the two appendices buttress the point I am making. One is about poverty reduction, which is programme specific and not department specific. Programme specific does not mean all the programmes would fall under the department if we were to consolidate them.
    Mr Speaker, however, in appropriation terms-- and let me emphasise that - in terms of appropriation, it is in respect to the MDA which could be lower. I cited the case of the School Feeding Programme, which is a social intervention; a very critical one at that, which is not under the Ministry of Education because it is paid out of DACF and other allocations.
    Mr Terkper 7:25 p.m.


    Mr Speaker, similarly, if you should take a programme, which is targeted at poverty reduction, it does not have to be consistent with the allocation for the expenditures that are under the Ministry of Education. You would always have some differences.

    Mr Speaker, in our endeavour to further enhance this, we are doing what is called aid on budget, whereby we would be reporting other expenditures incurred by NGOs in sectors to give a broader picture expenditures that are going to specific programmes which may not always pass through -- District Assemblies are a very good example.
    rose
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    Yes, Hon Member?
    Mr Osei-Mensah 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker. I do not think we are dealing with hypothetical situations here. [Interruptions.]
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    I cannot here you.
    Mr Osei-Mensah 7:25 p.m.
    We are not dealing
    with hypothetical situations here. We are dealing with actuals; figures that have been presented before us. These are the figures we are analysing and reconciling. So, what figure did they add to the figure they have in Appendix 5A, which resulted in the other figure we had in Appendix 7? If he could give us the source of the addition, maybe, we could appreciate what he is saying. But to say that the School Feeding Programme is under this, these are hypothetical situations. But we are dealing with specific situations of education and he should be able to explain to this House the additions to the GH¢ 6,740,437,383 before he arrived at the other figure.
    Mr Speaker, I asked if he could give us the composition of the sources of funding of GETFund. And this can clarify the situation.
    Thank you very much, Mr Speaker.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    Hon Member, it is not Question time. So, state your position, then I can advise the Hon Minister to respond. It is becoming clear to me that I will be putting the Question soon. So state your position.
    Mr Osei-Mensah 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, my position is -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:25 p.m.
    State your position, not the question.
    Mr Osei-Mensah 7:25 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what
    I am saying is that, his explanation, in my view, is not acceptable to me because we are dealing with a specific issue, which is the annual estimates for the Ministry of Education. So, where is the source of increase over the GH¢ 6,740,437,383 that lead to the GH¢7,058,320,457?
    And then, with GETFund, what are the sources of funding, so that we can reconcile the figures?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:35 p.m.
    Minister for Finance?
    Mr Terkper 7:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, let me emphasise again; Appendix 5(B), together with Government's obligations, is what informs the Appropriation, which is before the House. In fact, from appendices - in the economic classification, from Appendix 3 and then as you go to Appendix 4, which is the functional classification by departments -- So, what we are showing here are departments and their budgets as compiled from their estimates which are under the control of sector Ministers and the agencies under them.
    Mr Speaker, I am saying the difference is that, when you move from the Ministry of Education - and you talk about social intervention programmes as captured under the Millennium Development Authority (MiDA), you may have expenditures which are incurred as out of social intervention programmes, which do not necessarily fall under the Ministry of Education. I gave a good example. I am being specific and not hypothetical. I said the School Feeding Programme even though it benefits school children, the source is not from the Ghana Education Trust Fund (GETFund). Neither is it from the allocation made to the Ministry of Education from the budget; it is from the District Assemblies Common Fund
    (DACF).
    But you would agree with me that when I talk about social intervention in terms of education, you would not get the total picture if I restricted myself to the social intervention programmes in addition to others which come under goods and services under the Ministry of Education alone. Therefore, it is possible to envisage that when we talk about social inter-vention, we would have an allocation
    which is higher than what we have for the departmental allocation. That is the difference between sections 4 and 5 of the Budget Statement.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:35 p.m.
    I will take the Hon Minority Leader, then I will put the Question.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the issue being raised by the Hon Minister for Finance would have settled the matter if he dealt with specifics as the Hon Member related to.

    Mr Speaker, 2014 -- I am asking the Hon Minister; what was the total allocation for education?
    Mr Terkper 7:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, to answer that question, I may have to go - Again, if you go to section 6, paragraph 744, under Social Intervention, it starts by saying: “In the Education Sector, planned total expenditure for 2014 was GH¢6,147.5 million.” And it gives the details. That is for social intervention.
    If you want to know the allocation for the Ministry of Education, it is not under section 6, which talks about social intervention programmes as part of the total allocation for education. If you want to know what was allocated to the Ministry of Education, then you have to go to section 5 which talks about the departments.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:35 p.m.
    Hon Minister for Finance, the figure stated in section 5 and the figure stated in the Order Paper -- are they the same? [Interruption] He said if he wanted to talk about the Ministry, he would have to go to section 5.
    Mr Terkper 7:35 p.m.
    Yes, if you -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:35 p.m.
    The Motion is numbered 12?
    Motion on page 6; it is Motion number
    13
    Mr Terkper 7:35 p.m.
    Yes, the Motion - the figure there is consistent with section 5, not section 6 because that is the allocation to the Ministry and it is consistent with Appendix 4, not 5. This is because Appendix 5 is talking about poverty reduction programmes, whereas the appendices in 4 talk about allocations to the sector Ministries, which is what goes into the appropriation and which is what is before the House for approval.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:35 p.m.
    I will put the Question -
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 7:35 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, the reason I asked the question is the figure that appears in paragraph 744, which is -- [Interruption] -- For Education for 2014, it is GH¢6,147.5 million and it is the same figure for the Ministry of Education for 2014. If you go to Appendix 7, it is the same figure that has been quoted there -- GH¢ 6,147,543,907. It is the same figure. Which is why we are talking about some discrepancy between the figure for 2015, which now is GH¢7,058,320,457 as obtained here and what is on the Order Paper before us. What the Hon Minister mentioned -- the same figure for 2014, which appears in the appendix is the same figure for the Ministry of Education.
    But Mr Speaker, I will go with the Hon Majority Leader; we have gone through such developments before. We are not at the Appropriations yet and I would think that if there are challenges, we could do
    some reconciliations before we come to the passage of the Appropriation Bill. We are not there yet.
    So, I think that should be the recourse. Certainly, we have problems and if I may, the Minister himself, in the request as expressed in - is it paragraph 150? He came with a request for GH¢41billion but if you go to the total calculation, it comes up to GH¢44billion. Clearly, there are challenges and that is why I have said we are not at the Appropriations yet. I would think the better recourse will be to allow us to do what we have to do for education at least, for now until we get to the appropriations and between now and then perhaps, the reconciliation would be done.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:35 p.m.
    I will not invite any more comments. I will take the advice of the Hon Minority Leader and put the Question.
    Question put and Motion agreed to. Resolved:
    That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢6,740,437,383 for the services of the Ministry of Education for the year ending 31st December, 2015.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:35 p.m.
    Let me thank all Hon Members for your very interesting comments.
    Let me refer you -- those who - I am sure all of you would be interested. We have found the case of Attorney-General v Brown - (2010 SCGLR, 183) Attorney- General and Brown; 2010 Supreme Court of Ghana Law Report, page 183; Brown and the Attorney-General (the Audit Case)
    And basically, it deals with the proper construction of article 179; also, it deals with articles 178(1) (a), 187, 189, 3 (a) and (b) and so on. The question was whether the expenses of the Audit Service
    established by the Constitution, is a charge to the Consolidated Fund. So, the question was whether, the role of Parliament in that process. I recommend it to you. I was called upon to make a ruling. So, I have not made a ruling.
    Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 7:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, i t is appropriate now for us to move to item numbered 15, the referral. I will take time to go and read through it.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:45 p.m.
    Pardon me?
    Mr Bagbin 7:45 p.m.
    I said I am most grateful for drawing my attention to that decision. I will take my time to go and read it.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:45 p.m.
    I am sure you will do that.
    Mr Bagbin 7:45 p.m.
    Thank you, Sir.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:45 p.m.
    So, Item number 15, Hon Minister for Energy and Petroleum?
    ANNUAL ESTIMATES 7:45 p.m.

    Minister for Energy and Petroleum (Mr Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah) 7:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢799,615,234 for the services of the Ministries of Energy and Petroleum and Power for the year ending 31st December,
    2015.
    Mr Speaker, as it has already been severally noted, the power sector has experienced a lot of challenges, especially prolonged load shedding in 2014. Mr Speaker, notwithstanding that a lot has been achieved in 2014; we continue to approve just as it has been done today, a lot of power projects that will increase
    power generation. The Sunyani main 161 kilovolts bulk supply point to strengthen transmission was done this year. We have approved over 1000 communities to have rural electrification. We have brought the gas project and now, it is on inauguration.
    Mr Speaker, the oil production from the Jubilee Fields was stepped up in 2014 to the total production of over 31 million barrels. We increased average production to 105,000.
    Mr Speaker, 13,000 pieces of kilovolt (kv) cylinders were also distributed.
    Mr Speaker, in 2015, it is projected that additional 770 megawatts for power coming from Cal Power and other power plants should be added to the power generation.
    Over 1,500 communities are planned to be connected to the national grid and the Gas Infrastructure Project is expected to go into full commercial operations.
    Mr Speaker, a lot more projects have been captured in this Report. Mr Speaker, for all these programmes and projects, I move, that this Honourable House approves the sum of GHc 799,615,234 for the Ministry of Power and the Ministry of Petroleum for the 2015 financial year.
    Thank you.
    Question proposed.
    Dr Kwabena Donkor — rose -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:45 p.m.
    Yes?
    Question proposed.
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 7:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I rise to the support Motion and in doing so -
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:45 p.m.
    Hon Members, point of interest. Where is the Vice Chairman of the Committee? Give it to somebody; you have been elevated to higher Heaven. Or today, it is for the last? [Laughter.]
    Dr Kwabena Donkor 7:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to support the Motion and in doing so, I would want to present the Report of the Committee.
    Introduction
    The Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government of the Republic of Ghana for the 2015 fiscal year was presented to Parliament by the Minister for Finance, Hon Seth E. Terkper under the authority of His Excellency the President on Wednesday, 19th November, 2014 in accordance with article 179 of the Constitution.
    Consequent to this, the 2015 Annual Budget Estimates relating to the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum were referred to the Committee on Mines and Energy for consideration and report pursuant to Order 188 of the Standing Orders of the House.
    Deliberations
    The Committee met with the Minister for Energy and Petroleum, Hon Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah and his deputy, Hon Benjamin Dagadu, to discuss the estimates. Officials of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum and heads of agencies under the Ministry also attended the meeting to clarify issues relating to their respective agencies. In attendance were officials from the Ministry of Finance to assist in the deliberations.
    The Committee is grateful to the officials for their attendance and for providing clarifications on issues raised during the deliberations.
    Reference Documents
    The Committee referred to the following documents during its deliberations:
    i. The 1992 Constitution of the
    Republic of Ghana.
    ii. T h e S t a n d i n g O r d e r s o f Parliament.
    iii. The Petroleum Commission Act, 2011 (Act 821).
    iv. The Energy Commission Act, 1997 (Act 541).
    v. T h e P e t r o l e u m R e v e n u e Management Act, 2011 (Act
    815).
    vi. The Budget Statement and E c o n o m i c P o l i c y o f t h e Government of the Republic of Ghana for the 2015 fiscal year.
    Vision and Mission of the Ministry
    The vision of the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum is to ensure secure and sustainable supply of energy for Ghana and beyond.
    The mission of the Ministry is to formulate, monitor and evaluate policies for the provision of secure, safe and reliable supply of energy to meet Ghana's developmental needs in an efficient, competitive and environmentally friendly manner.
    S t r a t e g i c o b j e c t i v e s o f t h e Ministry
    The policy objectives for the Ministry under the 2015-2017 Medium Term Development Plan Framework (MTDPF) are grouped under two thematic areas comprising infrastructure and human resource development, and oil and gas development as follows:
    Infrastructure and Human Resource Development:
    i. Provide adequate, reliable
    and affordable energy to meet national needs and for exports.
    ii. Increase the proportion of renewable energy (solar biomass, wind, mini hydro and waste to energy) in the national energy supply mix.
    iii. Promote the conversion of waste to energy.
    iv. Explore the options for nuclear, geo-thermal and tidal wave energy.
    v. Ensure regular availability of petroleum products on the Ghanaian market.
    vi. Ensure efficient utilisation of energy.
    vii. Ensure that energy is produced and utilised in an environmen-tally sound manner.
    Oil and Gas Development
    i. Ensure accelerated and integrated development of the oil and gas industry.
    ii. Promote value addition in oil and gas.
    iii. S t rengthen technica l and regulatory capacity for the oil and gas industry.
    iv. Provide security for oil and gas installations and operations in the upstream, midstream and downstream.
    v. Ensure local content and local participation across the oil and
    gas value chain.
    vi. Leverage opportunities offered by the oil and gas industry to create decent jobs.
    vii. Ensure that the practices in the oil and gas industry are consistent with Ghanaian and international standards of environmental sustainability.
    viii.Ensure effective and transparent management of oil and gas revenue.
    Agencies under the Ministry
    The Ministry has oversight respon- sibilities over the underlisted Agencies:
    i. The Energy Commission;
    ii. The Volta River Authority (VRA) iii. The Bui Power Authority (BPA)
    iv. The Ghana Grid Company Limited (GRIDCo)
    v. The Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG)
    vi. The Nor thern Elec t r ic i ty Distribution Company (NEDCo);
    vii. The Volta Aluminum Company (VALCO)
    viii. The Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC)
    ix. T h e N a t i o n a l P e t r o l e u m Authority (NPA)
    x. The Petroleum Commission
    xi. The Tema Oil Refinery (TOR)
    xii. The Ghana National
    SPACE FOR TABLE 7:45 p.m.

    SPACE FOR TABLE 7:45 p.m.

    Mr Isaac K. Asiamah 7:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I will like to contribute to the Motion on the floor.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:45 p.m.
    The Motion has been moved, will you not second it?
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 7:45 p.m.
    It was seconded by the Chairman, so, I am not going to second it.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:45 p.m.
    Yes, sorry.
    Mr Isaac K. Asiamah (NPP - Atwima-Mponua) 7:45 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker for the opportunity to contribute to the Motion on the floor.
    Mr Speaker, the Committee met and observed some of these observations; inadequate provision for investment activities.
    Mr Isaac K. Asiamah (NPP - Atwima-Mponua) 7:45 p.m.


    Mr Speaker, the challenges confronting the Ministry are enormous and some of us believe that we have not been able to invest enough in the energy sector and that is why we have some of the difficulties we are going through, especially the issue of power generation.

    Mr Speaker, we believe that energy is critical for the growth of the economy. It is the pillar of any industrial growth. So, if this country will make any progress in our industrial development, we need to take it a little serious. So, investment is key that we observed.

    Mr Speaker, we also looked at the various investments in the oil sector and some of us believe strongly that the Ghana National Petroleum Company (GNPC) needs to be well positioned to ensure that we reap enough from the oil sector. We were unable to bring here the work programme for GNPC. Mr Speaker, as you know, the law allows us to deal with the GNPC separately with the work programme.

    As the year goes by, we are going to meet the GNPC to have our work programme and work on it and come to Parliament for full discussion of GNPC's activities for next year. So, we have to do that as per the Clearing Act, so that we will do that in the course of the year.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:45 p.m.
    If you want to power what?
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 7:45 p.m.
    No! Mr Speaker, as we speak now, today, we have dealt with Executive Instrument (E.I.) --
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:45 p.m.
    Hon Member, if you want to power what? I did not hear you.
    Mr I. K. Asiamah 7:45 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, what the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum [Interruptions]. Why the heckling?
    Mr Speaker, what we noticed was that and as we have dealt with it today, there has been a separation of the Ministry. We now have the Ministry of Power and Ministry of Petroleum. The initial E.I. brought was Ministry of Energy and Ministry of Power but I think today, it has been rectified here by the Attorney- General and Minister for Justice.
    Mr Speaker, all that we are asking or saying is that, in terms of the Ministry of Power, the new focus should be most importantly on generation which is critical. Quite often, we seem to touch on the latter part of it, which is distribution. Mr Speaker, that is not the real problem. The real problem confronting this country is about power generation. And we have asked that we need to diversify our generating sources, so that the generation sources will be more.
    We have been talking of the many hydros and we ask that the Ministry should invest more in the many hydros. So, the amount allocated to the Ministry, Mr Speaker, we are saying that it is not enough to indeed, provide the kind of resources and the kind of logistics we need for the Ministry.
    Mr Speaker, we also looked at one very critical aspect of the Ministry in terms of how their agencies acquired property. As we speak now, the GNPC have not been able to convince the Committee of how it is going to fund its office complex Last year, there was a major issue about the GNPC's office complex. When we met them, they have still not been able to convince us on how they are going to fund the office complex. So, we are urging the GNPC to ensure that there is, of course, an office complex that is well budgeted for.
    Mr Speaker, another issue is about the non-utilisation of GNPC's approved funds. When you go to their office, they have a whooping sum of money sitting out there without being used and we would want GNPC to ensure that whenever they are reporting, they indicate why such a huge amount of money is sitting out there and not being used. But they would still want us to approve of extra amount for them.
    Mr Speaker, with these few words, I support the Motion.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:55 p.m.
    Majority Leader, there are two more Hon Members on their feet. Should I take them there is Hon Mutawakilu Adam and there is Hon Dr Matthew Opoku Prempeh
    Hon Adam, you have three minutes and Hon Dr Prempeh, three minutes.
    Mr Mutawakilu Adam (NDC - Damongo) 7:55 p.m.
    Thank you, Mr Speaker, for giving me the opportunity to contribute to the Motion moved by the Chairman of the Mines and Energy Committee for the approval of the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy budget estimates.
    Mr Speaker, during the discussions, we realised that some of the agencies under the Ministry like Petroleum Commission, which is regulatory and therefore, ensuring that there is value for money for the Government in respect of development partners had not been adequately resourced to do its work. We urge that subsequently, Government should look at it to see how they could resource them to do their work.
    In the course of discussion, we also realised that with their vigilance, they were able to save over one billion Ghana cedis for this country. We also realised that in terms of the budget, about 80 per cent of that amount was coming from development partners and only about GH¢12 million was allocated from the
    Government of Ghana.
    Mr Speaker, withdrawing from these development partners, in a form of loans, last year, was just about 10 per cent. We want to urge, if the Government could see how they could resource the Ministry, so that it would be able to deliver what it is intended adequately.
    Mr Speaker, on this note, I support that the House should approve the amount indicated.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:55 p.m.
    Hon Prempeh?
    Dr Matthew Opoku Prempeh (NPP - Manhyia South) 7:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, in rising to support the annual budget estimates for the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy by the President's Executive Instrument (E.I.), the Ministry is now Ministry of Energy and the Ministry of Power
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:55 p.m.
    It has been corrected It is Ministry of Petroleum and the Ministry of Power.
  • [DR DON-
  • Dr Prempeh 7:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker I have not seen that E.I. Ministry of Petroleum and Ministry of Power.
    In reading the recommendations, I realised that the Committee rightly so, wants the House's approval to bring the programme of work of GNPC to this House early next year.
    Mr Speaker, the issue which this House must confront itself with, is about the Ghana Gas Company. Time and again, when Parliament requested for legal documentation legal status of our Ghana Gas Company, this House has not been furnished with it. The Committee of Mines and Energy has been requesting, Parliament has been requesting and that Agreement never came to this House.
    Mr Speaker, what do we find? We find in this Committee's Report, a whooping sum of US$235 million GNPC is purporting to want to give to Ghana Gas Company to operate next year. If Parliament wants to be taken serious in oversight of its responsibility over our petroleum sector then we must be serious. If one thinks that Ghana Gas Company cannot come to Parliament, so that we know what they do and it costs about a billion dollars from the gas processing plant that Parliament is not legally aware of now, Parliament should find a way of approving US$235 million to serve as capital cost. It does not sit well.
    Mr Speaker, in approval, I would recommend, that the Minister for Petroleum should do well to brief this House adequately on the rumpus on our airwaves, between a purported Chairman of the Ghana Gas Company Board and the Ministry of Petroleum itself, so that we would know and have proper oversight of Ghana Gas Company before it is fully absorbed or transferred to GNPC.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 7:55 p.m.
    Thank you Minister?
    Mr Buah 7:55 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to thank Hon Members for the contributions.
    I have noted all the recommendations, especially the need to make sure that GNPC and the Ghana Gas Company are very transparent to this House. My commitment is to make sure that we can bring all the information to make sure that it is properly scrutinised. The people of Ghana deserve that information and I can assure Hon Members that we would do that.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved:
    That this Honourable House approves the sum of GH¢799,615,234 for the services of the Ministries of Petroleum and Power for the year ending 31st December, 2015.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:05 p.m.
    Minority Leader?
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 8:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I would want to be clear. The Motion is for the approval of a stated sum for the services of the Ministries of Energy and Petroleum and Power, but in the budget, it is the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:05 p.m.
    But things have happened subsequent in the budget
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 8:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, we are dealing with what is contained in the budget the allocation is to the Ministry. If subsequently, they would do some decoupling, I believe we should not really saddle ourselves with that, because it came after the fact that - So, we should
    consign and confine ourselves to the request that was made by the Hon Minister for Finance to the House as contained in this piece along the lines for the two Ministries here.
    The Majority Leader is shaking his head. I do not know why he is shaking his head. If he could translate that shaking of head into some words of expression, I may want to respond to that.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:05 p.m.
    Hon Members, we will proceed because what
    is described in the Statement no longer legally exists. It has been overtaken by the turn of events. The Executive Instrument (E.I.) has created two new entities -- two new Ministries - one, the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum and two, Ministry of Power. What is in the Budget Statement has been overtaken by the EI. The same President who presented his Budget Statement has used his Executive powers to create an E.I. “E.I. 134 Civil Service (Ministries) (Amendment) Instrument,
    2014.
    In the exercise of the powers conferred on the President under section 11 of the Civil Service Act, 1993 (P. N. D. C. L.
    327), this Instrument is made this 21st day of November, 2014.
    E. I. 1 of 2013 amended
    This Civil Service (Ministries) Instrument, 2013 (E.I. 1) is amended as follows:
    (a) in item 4 by the substitution for “Ministry of Energy and Petroleum” of “Ministry of Petroleum”; and
    (b) by the addition to the list of Ministries of the Civil Service of the following: “Ministry of Power.”
    The Budget Statement was presented to us on Wednesday, 19th November, 2014. At that time, this E.I. had not been passed and therefore, the Ministry was the old one of Energy and Power. Now, there is a new testament and the Hon Minister-designate has been approved. He is being threatened that he should vacate his position as Hon Chairman of the Committee for his Vice Chairman. So, things have changed.
    Hon Minority Leader, things have changed.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 8:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, that is why I wanted us to tread cautiously because even the EI 134 that you are talking about, I am sorry you were not even in the
    House.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:05 p.m.
    I heard the entire debate. The debate was that there were two E.I.s and so on.
    Mr Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu 8:05 p.m.
    So, which one?
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:05 p.m.
    But
    that was resolved in the morning. If I am followed - Hon Minority Leader, because of things like this “you were not here.” I am sitting in my office and following with rapt attention every word, especially for certain Hon Members, including your goodself. Not because I do not trust you but because I learn so much from people like you. So, I followed the debate this
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:05 p.m.


    morning on E.I. 134 -- two EIs. What the Speaker - I saw you even asked the Speaker a question and the Speaker said you could not ask him a question. So, I was watching everything.

    I thank you for your intervention but I am trending cautiously but in accordance with law.

    Thank you, very much.

    Yes, Hon Majority Leader?
    Mr Bagbin 8:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your permission, we may now take a procedural Motion numbered item 35.
    MOTIONS 8:05 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 8:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80 (1) which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Amandi Energy Limited relating to a 190-240 MW Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze may be moved today.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:05 p.m.
    Hon Asiamah, second the Motion.
    You are one of the leading Hon Members of the Committee. Your reasoned intervention was very much appreciated.
    Hon Asiamah, second, please. I am inviting you to second the Motion numbered 35.
    Mr Isaac Asiamah 8:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Bagbin 8:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your kind permission, we may now take item number 36.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:05 p.m.
    Item number 36 - Hon Chairman of the Committee?
    Power Purchase Agreement between ECG and Amandi Energy Limited relating to a 190-240 MW Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant
    Facility at Aboadze.
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 8:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House adopts the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Amandi Energy Limited relating to a 190-240 MW Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze.
    Mr Speaker, in doing so, I present the Committee's Report.
    Mr Speaker, I would like to add a comment, that Government consent --
    Introduction
    The Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Amandi Energy Limited relating to a 190-240 MW Combined cycle Gas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze and Addendum to the Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and the Amandi Energy Limited relating to a 190-240 MW Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze were laid in Parliament by the Hon. Minister Energy and Petroleum on Thursday, 27th
    November, 2014.
    Subsequent to this, the documents were referred to the Select Committee on Mines and Energy for consideration and report pursuant to Order 188 of the Standing Orders of the House.
    Deliberations
    To consider the Referral, the Select Committee met with the Minister for Energy and Petroleum, Hon. Emmanuel Armah-Kofi Buah and officials of the Ministry to discuss the provisions of the Agreements. Officials of the Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG) also attended the meeting at the instance of the Committee to assist in the deliberations.
    The Committee is grateful to the Officials for attending upon the Committee and for clarifying issues raised during its deliberations.
    Reference Documents
    In course of deliberations on the Agreements, the Committee made reference to following documents:
    i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana
    ii. T h e S t a n d i n g O r d e r s o f Parliament
    iii. The Public Utility Regulatory Commission Act, 1997 (Act,
    538)
    iv. The Energy Commission Act, 1997 (Act, 541)
    v. The Environmental Protection Agency Act, 1994 (Act 490)
    vi. The Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 1999
    (L.I. 1652)
    vii. Other Agreements Connec ted to the Power Purchase Agreement including the Government Consent and Support Agreement, the Engineering, Procurement and Construction Contract and the Joint Services Agreement and.
    Background Information
    The Government of Ghana continues to adopt strategies aimed at achieving sufficiency in power generation to meet the growing electricity demand of the country. Currently, the Government has developed strategies towards achieving the target of 5,000 MW of installed generation capacity by 2016. Amongthe key strategies is the strategy to secure the participation of the private in power generation.
    In 2013, Ghana's total peak demand was about 1,943 M W. According to Ghana's Generation Master Plan, forecast peak demand for 2014 is around 2,200 M W. The implication is that by 2015, electricity demand will outstrip the available power from the current installed generation capacity of about 2,850 M W. It is in respect of this that the Government has set a target to achieve generation capacity of 5,000 MW by 2016 in order to meet the projected demand, maintain surplus electricity for export.
    In furtherance of this strategy, the Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG) entered into a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) with the Amandi Energy Limited on 31st July, 2013 for the purchase of offered capacity and electrical energy to be produced from 190-240 MW Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant Facility over a period of twenty-five (25) years.
    SPACE FOR TABLE 8:05 p.m.

    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:05 p.m.
    Hon Member, you are too active after being approved by this House to join the Executive. If it was one Motion - you are practically, - do you not have a Vice Chairman?
    It is true, the Constitution is clear, he has not been sworn in. But what practice should we develop? So, if a man is not sworn in between 5 and 6 days, then he is here actively - Chairman, I think he has been sworn in. He is still the Chairman. It is like the Hon Majority Leader is still the Chairman of the Constitutional, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee. I am a member of that Committee and he is my Chairman. It is alright. I will not say anything.
    Mr Robert Nachinab Doameng Mosore (NPP - Talensi) 8:05 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I second the Motion.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:05 p.m.
    Hon Members, please, I am going to take one contribution each. So, if you want to contribute, speak to the Hon Ranking Member and take that opportunity to comment. There would be more.
    Mr Bagbin 8:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your permission, we now take Resolution numbered item 37 on the Order Paper.
    RESOLUTIONS 8:15 p.m.

    Minister for Finance) 8:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that
    WHEREAS by the provisions of Article 181(5) of the Constitution the terms and conditions of any international business or economic transaction to which the Govern- ment of Ghana is a party shall not come into operation unless the said terms and conditions have been laid before Parliament and approved by Parliament by a Resolution supported by the votes of a majority of all Members of Parliament;
    PURSUANT to the provisions of the said article 181(5) of the Constitution, and at the request of the Government of Ghana acting through the Minister responsible for Finance, there has been laid before Parliament the terms and conditions of a Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Amandi Energy Limited relating to a 190-240 MW
    Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze.
    THIS HONOURABLE HOUSE 8:15 p.m.

    H E R E B Y R E S O LV E A S 8:15 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 8:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Resolution.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:15 p.m.
    Majority Leader, any consultation.
    Mr Bagbin 8:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your kind permission, we take item number 38. It is a procedural Motion.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:15 p.m.
    Item 38, Chairman of the Committee?
    MOTIONS 8:15 p.m.

    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 8:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that notwithstanding the provisions of Standing Order 80(1) which require that no Motion shall be debated until at least, forty-eight hours have elapsed
    between the date on which notice of the Motion is given and the date on which the Motion is moved, the Motion for the adoption of the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Addendum to the Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Amandi Energy Limited relating to a 190-240 MW Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze may be moved today.
    rose
    Mr Isaac K. Asiamah 8:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, he is not a member of the Committee, so that is why.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to second the Motion.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:15 p.m.
    Hon member? It is procedural. So, the Motion is moved and seconded for the consideration of the House.
    Question put and Motion agreed to.
    Resolved accordingly.
    Mr Bagbin 8:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, with your kind permission, we take item number 39.
    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:15 p.m.
    Item 39, Chairman of the Committee or Vice Chairman?
    Power Purchase Agreement between ECG and Amandi Energy
    Limited
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 8:15 p.m.
    Mr Speaker, I beg to move, that this Honourable House
    adopts the Report of the Committee on Mines and Energy on the Addendum to the Power Purchase Agreement between the Electricity Company of Ghana and Amandi Energy Limited relating to a 190-240MW Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze.
    Mr Speaker, I present your Committee's Report.
    Introduction
    The Power Purchase Agreement be- tween the Electricity Company of Ghana and Amandi Energy Limited relating to a 190-240 MW Combined cycle Gas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze and Addendum to the Power Purchase Agreement be- tween the Electricity Company of Ghana and the Amandi Energy Limited relating to a 190-240MW Combined Cycle Gas Power Plant Facility at Aboadze were laid in Parliament by the Hon Minister for Energy and Petroleum on Thursday, 27th November, 2014.
    Subsequent to this, the documents were referred to the Select Committee on Mines and Energy for consideration and report pursuant to Order 188 of the Standing Orders of the House.
    Deliberations
    To consider the referral, the Select Committee met with the Minister for Energy and Petroleum, Hon Emmanuel Kofi-Armah Buah and officials of the Ministry to discuss the provisions of the Agreements. Officials of the Electricity Company of Ghana (ECG) also attended the meeting at the instance of the Commit- tee to assist in the deliberations.
    The Committee is grateful to the of- ficials for attending upon the Committee and for clarifying issues raised during its deliberations.
    Chairman of the Committee (Dr Kwabena Donkor) 8:15 p.m.


    Reference Documents

    In course of deliberations on the Agreements, the Committee made reference to the following documents:

    i. The 1992 Constitution of the Republic of Ghana.

    ii. The Standing Orders of Par-liament.

    iii. The Public Utility Regulatory Commission Act, 1997 (Act, 538).

    iv. The Energy Commission Act, 1997 (Act, 541).

    v. The Environmental Protection Agency Act, 1994 (Act 490).

    vi. The Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations, 1999 (L.I. 1652).

    vii. Other Agreements Connected to the Power Purchase Agreement in- cluding the Government Consent and Support Agree- ment, the Engineering, Pro- curement and Construction Contract and the Joint Services Agreement and.
    SPACE FOR TABLE 8:15 p.m.

    Mr Second Deputy Speaker 8:15 p.m.
    Thank
    you. Who seconds the motion?
    Hon Asiamah?